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Author Petrangeli, Gianni
Title Nuclear Safety
Imprint Jordan Hill : Elsevier Science & Technology, 2006
©2006
book jacket
Edition 1st ed
Descript 1 online resource (447 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Front cover -- Title page -- Copyright -- Table of contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Chapter 1 Introduction -- 1-1. Objectives -- 1-2. A short history of nuclear safety technology -- 1-2-1. The early years -- 1-2-2. From the late 1950s to the Three Mile Island accident -- 1-2-3. From the Three Mile Island accident to the Chernobyl accident -- 1-2-4. The Chernobyl accident and after -- References -- Chapter notes -- Chapter 2 Inventory and localization of radioactive products in the plant -- References -- Chapter 3 Safety systems and their functions -- 3-1. Plant systems -- 3-2. Safety systems and accidents -- 3-3. Future safety systems and plant concepts -- 3-3-1. General remarks -- 3-3-2. Some passive safety systems for nuclear plants -- 3-3-3. Inherently safe systems in the process industries -- References -- Chapter notes -- Chapter 4 The classification of accidents and a discussion of some examples -- 4-1. Classification -- 4-2. Design basis accidents -- 4-2-1. Some important data for accident analysis -- 4-2-2. Example of a category 2 accident: spurious opening of a pressurizer safety valve -- 4-2-3. Example of a category 3 accident: instantaneous power loss to all the primary pumps -- 4-2-4. Example of a category 4 accident: main steam line break -- 4-2-5. Example of a category 4 accident: sudden expulsion of a control rod from the core -- 4-2-6. Example of a category 4 accident: break of the largest pipe of the primary system (large LOCA) -- 4-2-7. Example of a category 4 accident: fuel handling accident -- 4-2-8. Area accidents -- 4-3. Beyond design basis accidents -- 4-3-1. Plant originated accidents -- 4-3-2. Accidents due to human voluntary actions -- 4-4. External accidents of natural origin -- References -- Chapter notes -- Chapter 5 Severe accidents -- 5-1. Existing plants
5-2. Future plants: extreme and practicable solutions -- 5-3. Severe accident management: the present state of studies and implementations -- 5-4. Data on severe accidents -- 5-5. Descriptions of some typical accident sequences -- 5-5-1. Loss of station electric power supply (TE = transient + loss of electrical supply) -- 5-5-2. Loss of electric power with LOCA from the pump seals (SE = small LOCA + loss of electric power) -- 5-5-3. Interfacing systems LOCA (V) -- 5-5-4. Large LOCA with failure of the recirculation (ALFC) -- 5-5-5. Small LOCA with failure of the recirculation (SLFC) -- 5-6. 'Source terms' for severe accidents -- References -- Chapter 6 The dispersion of radioactivity releases -- 6-1. The most interesting releases for safety evaluations -- 6-2. Dispersion of releases: phenomena -- 6-3. Release dispersion: simple evaluation techniques -- 6-4. Formulae and diagrams for the evaluation of atmospheric dispersion -- Reference -- Chapter notes -- Chapter 7 Health consequences of releases -- 7-1. The principles of health protection and safety -- 7-2. Some quantities, terms and units of measure of health physics -- 7-3. Types of effects of radiation doses and limits -- 7-4. Evaluation of the health consequences of releases -- 7-4-1. Evaluation of inhalation doses from radioactive iodine -- 7-4-2. Evaluation of doses due to submersion in a radioactive cloud -- 7-4-3. Evaluation of the doses of radiation from caesium-137 deposited on the ground ('ground-shine' dose) -- 7-4-4. Evaluation of the dose due to deposition of plutonium on the ground -- 7-4-5. Indicative evaluation of long distance doses for very serious accidents to nuclear reactors -- 7-4-6. Direct radiation doses -- Reference -- Chapter notes -- Chapter 8 The general approach to the safety of the plant-site complex -- 8-1. Introduction
8-2. The definition of the safety objectives of a plant on a site -- 8-2-1. The objectives and limits of release/dose -- 8-3. Some plant characteristics for the prevention and mitigation of accidents -- 8-4. Radiation protection characteristics -- 8-5. Site characteristics -- Chapter 9 Defence in depth -- 9-1. Definition, objectives, levels and barriers -- 9-2. Additional considerations on the levels of Defence in Depth -- Chapter 10 Quality assurance -- 10-1. General remarks and requirements -- 10-2. Aspects to be underlined -- Reference -- Chapter 11 Safety analysis -- 11-1. Introduction -- 11-2. Deterministic safety analysis -- 11-3. Probabilistic safety analysis -- 11-3-1. Event trees -- 11-3-2. Fault trees -- 11-3-3. Failure rates -- References -- Chapter notes -- Chapter 12 Safety analysis review -- 12-1. Introduction -- 12-2. The reference points -- 12-3. Foreseeing possible issues for discussion -- 12-4. Control is not disrespectful -- 12-5. Clarification is not disrespectful -- 12-6. Designer report -- 12-6-1. Introduction -- 12-6-2. Conclusions -- 12-6-3. Hydrodynamic aspects -- 12-6-4. Effective mass of oscillating system -- 12-6-5. Evaluation of fluid damping -- 12-6-6. Vibration analysis -- 12-7. Discussion -- References -- Chapter notes -- Chapter 13 Classification of plant components -- Reference -- Chapter 14 Notes on some plant components -- 14-1. Reactor pressure vessel -- 14-1-1. Problems highlighted by operating experience -- 14-1-2. Rupture probability of non-nuclear vessels -- 14-1-3. Failure probability of nuclear vessels -- 14-1-4. Vessel material embrittlement due to neutron irradiation -- 14-1-5. Pressurized thermal shock -- 14-1-6. The reactor pressure vessel of Three Mile Island 2 -- 14-1-7. General perspective on the effect of severe accidents on the pressure vessel
14-1-8. Recommendations for the prevention of hypothetical accidents generated by the pressure vessel -- 14-2. Piping -- 14-2-1. Evolution of the regulatory positions -- 14-2-2. Problems indicated by experience -- 14-2-3. Leak detection in water reactors -- 14-2-4. Research programmes on piping -- 14-3. Valves -- 14-3-1. General remarks -- 14-3-2. Some data from operating experience -- 14-3-3. The most commonly used types of valve -- 14-3-4. Types of valve: critical areas, design and operation -- 14-3-5. Valve standards -- 14-4. Containment systems -- References -- Chapter 15 Earthquake resistance -- 15-1. General aspects, criteria and starting data -- 15-2. Reference ground motion -- 15-3. Structural verifications -- 15-3-1. Foundation soil resistance -- 15-3-2. Resistance of structures -- References -- Chapter 16 Tornado resistance -- 16-1. The physical phenomenon -- 16-2. Scale of severity of the phenomenon -- 16-3. Design input data -- Reference -- Chapter 17 Resistance to external impact -- 17-1. Introduction -- 17-2. Aircraft crash impact -- 17-2-1. Effects of an aircraft impact -- 17-2-2. Overall load on a structure -- 17-2-3. Vibration of structures and components -- 17-2-4. Local perforation of structures -- 17-2-5. The effect of a fire -- 17-2-6. Temporary incapacity of the operating personnel -- 17-3. Pressure wave -- 17-5. Other impacts -- References -- Chapter 18 Nuclear safety criteria -- 18-1. General characteristics -- 18-2. The US general design criteria -- 18-3. IAEA criteria -- 18-4. EUR criteria -- 18-5. Other general criteria compilations -- References -- Chapter notes -- Chapter 19 Nuclear safety research -- Reference -- Chapter 20 Operating experience -- 20-1. Introduction -- 20-2. Principal sources -- 20-3. Some significant events -- 20-3-1. Mechanical events -- 20-3-2. Electrical events -- 20-3-3. System events
20-3-4. Area events -- 20-3-5. Reactivity accidents -- 20-3-6. Possible future accidents -- 20-4. The International Nuclear Event Scale -- References -- Chapter 21 Underground location of nuclear power plants -- References -- Chapter 22 The effects of nuclear explosions -- 22-1. Introduction -- 22-2. Types of nuclear bomb -- 22-3. The consequences of a nuclear explosion -- 22-4. Initial nuclear radiation -- 22-5. Shock wave -- 22-6. Initial thermal radiation -- 22-7. Initial radioactive contamination ('fallout') -- 22-8. Underground nuclear tests -- 22-8-1. Historical data on nuclear weapons tests -- 22-8-2. The possible effects of an underground nuclear explosion -- 22-8-3. The possible radiological effects of the underground tests -- References -- Chapter 23 Radioactive waste -- 23-1. Types and indicative amounts of radioactive waste -- 23-2. Principles -- Reference -- Chapter 24 Fusion safety -- References -- Chapter 25 Safety of specific plants and of other activities -- 25-1. Boiling water reactors -- 25-2. Pressure tube reactors -- 25-3. Gas reactors -- 25-4. Research reactors -- 25-5. Sodium-cooled fast reactors -- 25-6. Fuel plants -- 25-7. Nuclear seawater desalination plants -- 25-8. VVER plants -- 25-9. Ship propulsion reactors -- 25-10. Safe transport of radioactive substances -- 25-11. Safety of radioactive sources and of radiation generating machines -- References -- Chapter 26 Nuclear facilities on satellites -- 26-1. Types of plant -- 26-2. Possible accidents and their consequences -- Reference -- Chapter 27 Erroneous beliefs about nuclear safety -- References -- Chapter 28 When can we say that a particular plant is safe? -- Chapter 29 The limits of nuclear safety: the residual risk -- 29-1. Risk in general -- 29-2. Risk concepts and evaluations in nuclear installation safety -- 29-2-1. Tolerable risk
29-2-2. Risk-informed decisions
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Petrangeli, Gianni Nuclear Safety Jordan Hill : Elsevier Science & Technology,c2006 9780750667234
Subject Nuclear power plants -- Safety measures.;Nuclear facilities -- Safety measures
Electronic books
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