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Author Rashid, Muhammad H
Title Power Electronics Handbook
Imprint Saint Louis : Elsevier Science & Technology, 2011
©2011
book jacket
Edition 3rd ed
Descript 1 online resource (1409 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Front Cover -- Power Electronics Handbook -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Table of Contents -- Preface for Third Edition -- Chapter 1. Introduction -- 1.1. Power Electronics Defined -- 1.2. Key Characteristics -- 1.3. Trends in Power Supplies -- 1.4. Conversion Examples -- 1.5. Tools for Analysis and Design -- 1.6. Sample Applications -- 1.7. Summary -- References -- Section I: Power Electronics Devices -- Chapter 2. The Power Diode -- 2.1. Diode as a Switch -- 2.2. Properties of PN Junction -- 2.3. Common Diode Types -- 2.4. Typical Diode Ratings -- 2.5. Snubber Circuits for Diode -- 2.6. Series and Parallel Connection of Power Diodes -- 2.7. Typical Applications of Diodes -- 2.8. Standard Datasheet for Diode Selection -- References -- Chapter 3. Power Bipolar Transistors -- 3.1. Introduction -- 3.2. Basic Structure and Operation -- 3.3. Static Characteristics -- 3.4. Dynamic Switching Characteristics -- 3.5. Transistor Base Drive Applications -- 3.6. SPICE Simulation of Bipolar Junction Transistors -- 3.7. BJT Applications -- Further Reading -- Chapter 4. The Power MOSFET -- 4.1. Introduction -- 4.2. Switching in Power Electronic Circuits -- 4.3. General Switching Characteristics -- 4.4. The Power MOSFET -- 4.5. Future Trends in Power Devices -- References -- Chapter 5. Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor -- 5.1. Introduction -- 5.2. Basic Structure and Operation -- 5.3. Static Characteristics -- 5.4. Dynamic Switching Characteristics -- 5.5. IGBT Performance Parameters -- 5.6. Gate Drive Requirements -- 5.7. Circuit Models -- 5.8. Applications -- Further Reading -- Chapter 6. Thyristors -- 6.1. Introduction -- 6.2. Basic Structure and Operation -- 6.3. Static Characteristics -- 6.4. Dynamic Switching Characteristics -- 6.5. Thyristor Parameters -- 6.6. Types of Thyristors -- 6.7. Gate Drive Requirements -- 6.8. PSpice Model -- 6.9. Applications
Further Reading -- Chapter 7. Gate Turn-off Thyristors -- 7.1. Introduction -- 7.2. Basic Structure and Operation -- 7.3. GTO Thyristor Models -- 7.4. Static Characteristics -- 7.5. Switching Phases -- 7.6. SPICE GTO Model -- 7.7. Applications -- References -- Chapter 8. MOS Controlled Thyristors (MCTs) -- 8.1. Introduction -- 8.2. Equivalent Circuit and Switching Characteristics -- 8.3. Comparison of MCT and Other Power Devices -- 8.4. Gate Drive for MCTs -- 8.5. Protection of MCTs -- 8.6. Simulation Model of an MCT -- 8.7. Generation-1 and Generation-2 MCTs -- 8.8. N-channel MCT -- 8.9. Base Resistance-controlled Thyristor -- 8.10. MOS Turn-off Thyristor -- 8.11. Applications of PMCT -- 8.12. Conclusions -- 8.13. Appendix -- References -- Chapter 9. Static Induction Devices -- 9.1. Introduction -- 9.2. Theory of Static Induction Devices -- 9.3. Characteristics of Static Induction Transistor -- 9.4. Bipolar Mode Operation of SI devices (BSIT) -- 9.5. CMT Conductivity Modulation Transistor -- 9.6. Static Induction Diode -- 9.7. Lateral Punch-Through Transistor -- 9.8. Static Induction Transistor Logic -- 9.9. BJT Saturation Protected by SIT -- 9.10. Static Induction MOS Transistor -- 9.11. Space Charge Limiting Load (SCLL) -- 9.12. Power MOS Transistors -- 9.13. Static Induction Thyristor -- 9.14. Gate Turn-Off Thyristor -- 9.15. Summary -- References -- Section II: Power Conversion -- Chapter 10. Diode Rectifiers -- 10.1. Introduction -- 10.2. Single-phase Diode Rectifiers -- 10.3. Three-phase Diode Rectifiers -- 10.4. Poly-phase Diode Rectifiers -- 10.5. Filtering Systems in Rectifier Circuits -- 10.6. High-frequency Diode Rectifier Circuits -- Further Reading -- Chapter 11. Single-phase Controlled Rectifiers -- 11.1. Introduction -- 11.2. Line-commutated Single-phase Controlled Rectifiers -- 11.3. Unity Power Factor Single-phase Rectifiers
References -- Chapter 12. Three-phase Controlled Rectifiers -- 12.1. Introduction -- 12.2. Line-commutated Controlled Rectifiers -- 12.3. Force-commutated Three-phase Controlled Rectifiers -- Further Reading -- Chapter 13. DC-DC Converters -- 13.1. Introduction -- 13.2. DC Choppers -- 13.3. Step-down (Buck) Converter -- 13.4. Step-up (Boost) Converter -- 13.5. Buck-Boost Converter -- 13.6. Cuk Converter -- 13.7. Effects of Parasitics -- 13.8. Synchronous and Bidirectional Converters -- 13.9. Control Principles -- 13.10. Applications of DC-DC Converters -- Further Reading -- Chapter 14. DC/DC Conversion Technique and Twelve Series Luo-converters -- 14.1. Introduction -- 14.2. Fundamental, Developed, Transformer-type, and Self-lift Converters -- 14.3. Voltage-lift Luo-converters -- 14.4. Double Output Luo-converters -- 14.5. Super-lift Luo-converters -- 14.6. Ultra-lift Luo-converters -- 14.7. Multiple-quadrant Operating Luo-converters -- 14.8. Switched-capacitor Multi-quadrant Luo-converters -- 14.9. Multiple-lift Push-Pull Switched-capacitor Luo-converters -- 14.10. Switched-inductor Multi-quadrant Operation Luo-converters -- 14.11. Multi-quadrant ZCS Quasi-resonant Luo-converters -- 14.12. Multi-quadrant ZVS Quasi-resonant Luo-converters -- 14.13. Synchronous-rectifier DC/DC Luo-converters -- 14.14. Multiple-element Resonant Power Converters -- 14.15. Gate Control Luo-resonator -- 14.16. Applications -- 14.17. Energy Factor and Mathematical Modeling for Power DC/DC Converters -- Further Reading -- Chapter 15. Inverters -- 15.1. Introduction -- 15.2. Single-phase Voltage Source Inverters -- 15.3. Three-phase Voltage Source Inverters -- 15.4. Current Source Inverters -- 15.5. Closed-loop Operation of Inverters -- 15.6. Regeneration in Inverters -- 15.7. Multistage Inverters -- Further Reading -- Chapter 16. Resonant and Soft-switching Converters
16.1. Introduction -- 16.2. Classification -- 16.3. Resonant Switch -- 16.4. Quasi-resonant Converters -- 16.5. ZVS in High Frequency Applications -- 16.6. Multi-resonant Converters (MRC) -- 16.7. Zero-voltage-transition (ZVT) Converters -- 16.8. Non-dissipative Active Clamp Network -- 16.9. Load Resonant Converters -- 16.10. Control Circuits for Resonant Converters -- 16.11. Extended-period Quasi-resonant (EP-QR) Converters -- 16.12. Soft-switching and EMI Suppression -- 16.13. Snubbers and Soft-switching for High Power Devices -- 16.14. Soft-switching DC-AC Power Inverters -- References -- Chapter 17. Multilevel Power Converters -- 17.1. Introduction -- 17.2. Multilevel Power Converter Structures -- 17.3. Multilevel Converter PWM Modulation Strategies -- 17.4. Multilevel Converter Design Example -- 17.5. Fault Diagnosis in Multilevel Converters -- 17.6. Renewable Energy Interface -- 17.7. Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 18. AC-AC Converters -- 18.1. Introduction -- 18.2. Single-Phase AC-AC Voltage Controller -- 18.3. Three-Phase AC-AC Voltage Controllers -- 18.4. Cycloconverters -- 18.5. Matrix Converter -- 18.6. High Frequency Linked Single-Phase to Three-Phase Matrix Converters -- 18.7. Applications of AC-AC Converters -- References -- Chapter 19. Power Factor Correction Circuits -- 19.1. Introduction -- 19.2. Definition of PF and THD -- 19.3. Power Factor Correction -- 19.4. CCM Shaping Technique -- 19.5. DCM Input Technique -- 19.6. Summary -- Further Reading -- Chapter 20. Gate Drive Circuitry for Power Converters -- 20.1. Introduction to Gate Drive Circuitry -- 20.2. Semiconductor Drive Requirements -- 20.3. Gate Drivers for Power Converters -- 20.4. Gate Driver Circuit Implementation -- 20.5. Current Technologies -- 20.6. Current and Future Trends -- 20.7. Summary -- References -- Section III: General Applications
Chapter 21. Power Electronics in Capacitor Charging Applications -- 21.1. Introduction -- 21.2. High-Voltage DC Power Supply with Charging Resistor -- 21.3. Resonance Charging -- 21.4. Switching Converters -- References -- Chapter 22. Electronic Ballasts -- 22.1. Introduction -- 22.2. High Frequency Supply of Discharge Lamps -- 22.3. Discharge Lamp Modeling -- 22.4. Resonant Inverters for Electronic Ballasts -- 22.5. High-Power Factor Electronic Ballasts -- 22.6. Applications -- References -- Chapter 23. Power Supplies -- 23.1. Introduction -- 23.2. Linear Series Voltage Regulator -- 23.3. Linear Shunt Voltage Regulator -- 23.4. Integrated Circuit Voltage Regulators -- 23.5. Switching Regulators -- Further Reading -- Chapter 24. Uninterruptible Power Supplies -- 24.1. Introduction -- 24.2. Classifications -- 24.3. Performance Evaluation -- 24.4. Applications -- 24.5. Control Techniques -- 24.6. Energy Storage Devices -- Further Reading -- Chapter 25. Automotive Applications of Power Electronics -- 25.1. Introduction -- 25.2. The Present Automotive Electrical Power System -- 25.3. System Environment -- 25.4. Functions Enabled by Power Electronics -- 25.5. Multiplexed Load Control -- 25.6. Electromechanical Power Conversion -- 25.7. Dual/High Voltage Automotive Electrical Systems -- 25.8. Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicles -- 25.9. Summary -- References -- Chapter 26. Solid State Pulsed Power Electronics -- 26.1. Introduction -- 26.2. Power Semiconductors for Pulsed Power -- 26.3. Load Types and Requirements -- 26.4. Solid-State Pulsed Power Topologies -- 26.5. Conclusions and Future Trends -- References -- Section IV: Power Generation and Distribution -- Chapter 27. Photovoltaic System Conversion -- 27.1. Introduction -- 27.2. Solar Cell Characteristics -- 27.3. Photovoltaic Technology Operation -- 27.4. Maximum Power Point Tracking Components
27.5. MPPT Controlling Algorithms
Power electronics, which is a rapidly growing area in terms of research and applications, uses modern electronics technology to convert electric power from one form to another, such as ac-dc, dc-dc, dc-ac, and ac-ac with a variable output magnitude and frequency. It has many applications in our every day life such as air-conditioners, electric cars, sub-way trains, motor drives, renewable energy sources and power supplies for computers. This book covers all aspects of switching devices, converter circuit topologies, control techniques, analytical methods and some examples of their applications. Designed to appeal to a new generation of engineering professionals, Power Electronics Handbook, 3rd Edition features four new chapters covering renewable energy, energy transmission, energy storage, as well as an introduction to Distributed and Cogeneration (DCG) technology, including gas turbines, gensets, microturbines, wind turbines, variable speed generators, photovoltaics and fuel cells, has been gaining momentum for quite some time now.smart grid technology. With this book readers should be able to provide technical design leadership on assigned power electronics design projects and lead the design from the concept to production involving significant scope and complexity. Contains 45 chapters covering all aspects of power electronics and its applications Three new chapters now including coverage Energy Sources, Energy Storage and Electric Power Transmission Contributions from more than fifty leading experts spanning twelve different countries
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Rashid, Muhammad H. Power Electronics Handbook Saint Louis : Elsevier Science & Technology,c2011 9780123820365
Subject Power electronics -- Encyclopedias.;Electronics
Electronic books
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