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Author Lynn, Peter
Title Methodology of Longitudinal Surveys
Imprint New York : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2009
©2009
book jacket
Edition 1st ed
Descript 1 online resource (418 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series Wiley Series in Survey Methodology Ser
Wiley Series in Survey Methodology Ser
Note Intro -- Methodology of Longitudinal Surveys -- Contents -- Preface -- 1 Methods for Longitudinal Surveys -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Types of Longitudinal Surveys -- 1.3 Strengths of Longitudinal Surveys -- 1.3.1 Analysis Advantages -- 1.3.2 Data Collection Advantages -- 1.4 Weaknesses of Longitudinal Surveys -- 1.4.1 Analysis Disadvantages -- 1.4.2 Data Collection Disadvantages -- 1.5 Design Features Specific to Longitudinal Surveys -- 1.5.1 Population, Sampling and Weighting -- 1.5.2 Other Design Issues -- 1.6 Quality in Longitudinal Surveys -- 1.6.1 Coverage Error -- 1.6.2 Sampling Error -- 1.6.3 Nonresponse Error -- 1.6.4 Measurement Error -- 1.7 Conclusions -- References -- 2 Sample Design for Longitudinal Surveys -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Types of Longitudinal Sample Design -- 2.3 Fundamental Aspects of Sample Design -- 2.3.1 Defining the Longitudinal Population -- 2.3.2 Target Variables -- 2.3.3 Sample Size -- 2.3.4 Clustering -- 2.3.5 Treatment of Movers -- 2.3.6 Stratification -- 2.3.7 Variances and Design Effects -- 2.3.8 Selection Probabilities -- 2.4 Other Aspects of Design and Implementation -- 2.4.1 Choice of Rotation Period and Pattern -- 2.4.2 Dealing with Births (and Deaths) -- 2.4.3 Sample Overlap -- 2.4.4 Stability of Units and Hierarchies -- 2.5 Conclusion -- References -- 3 Ethical Issues in Longitudinal Surveys -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 History of Research Ethics -- 3.3 Informed Consent -- 3.3.1 Initial Consent -- 3.3.2 Continuing Consent -- 3.3.3 Consent to Trace Respondents -- 3.3.4 Consent for Unanticipated Activities or Analyses -- 3.3.5 Implications for Consent of Changing Circumstances of Sample Members -- 3.3.6 Consent for Linkage to Administrative Data -- 3.3.7 Using Administrative Data without Full Consent -- 3.3.8 Can Fully Informed Consent be Realised? -- 3.4 Free Choice Regarding Participation
3.5 Avoiding Harm -- 3.6 Participant Confidentiality and Data Protection -- 3.6.1 Dependent Interviewing -- 3.6.2 The Treatment of Research Data -- 3.7 Independent Ethical Overview and Participant Involvement -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 4 Enhancing Longitudinal Surveys by Linking to Administrative Data -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Administrative Data as a Research Resource -- 4.3 Record Linkage Methodology -- 4.4 Linking Survey Data with Administrative Data at Individual Level -- 4.4.1 Sampling, Sample Maintenance and Sample Evaluation -- 4.4.2 Evaluation Methodology -- 4.4.3 Supplementing and Validating Survey Data -- 4.5 Ethical and Legal Issues -- 4.5.1 Ethical Issues -- 4.5.2 Legal Issues -- 4.5.3 Disclosure Control -- 4.6 Conclusion -- References -- 5 Tackling Seam Bias Through Questionnaire Design -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Previous Research on Seam Bias -- 5.3 SIPP and its Dependent Interviewing Procedures -- 5.3.1 SIPP's Pre-2004 Use of DI -- 5.3.2 Development of New DI Procedures -- 5.3.3 Testing and Refining the New Procedures -- 5.4 Seam Bias Comparison - SIPP 2001 and SIPP 2004 -- 5.4.1 Seam Bias Analysis for Programme Participation and Other 'Spell' Characteristics -- 5.4.2 Seam Bias Evaluation for Income Amount Transitions -- 5.5 Conclusions and Discussion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 6 Dependent Interviewing: A Framework and Application to Current Research -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Dependent Interviewing - What and Why? -- 6.2.1 Data Quality -- 6.2.2 Survey Processes -- 6.3 Design Options and their Effects -- 6.3.1 Reactive Dependent Interviewing -- 6.3.2 Proactive Dependent Interviewing -- 6.4 Empirical Evidence -- 6.4.1 Income Sources -- 6.4.2 Current Earnings -- 6.4.3 Current Employment -- 6.4.4 Labour Market Activity Histories -- 6.4.5 School-Based Qualifications
6.5 Effects of Dependent Interviewing on Data Quality Across Surveys -- 6.6 Open Issues -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 7 Attitudes Over Time: The Psychology of Panel Conditioning -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Panel Conditioning -- 7.3 The Cognitive Stimulus Hypothesis -- 7.4 Data and Measures -- 7.5 Analysis -- 7.6 Discussion -- References -- 8 Some Consequences of Survey Mode Changes in Longitudinal Surveys -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Why Change Survey Modes in Longitudinal Surveys? -- 8.3 Why Changing Survey Mode Presents a Problem -- 8.3.1 Changes in Question Structure -- 8.3.2 Effects of Visual vs. Aural Communication Channels -- 8.3.3 Interviewer Presence -- 8.3.4 How Answers to Scalar Questions are Affected by Visual vs. Aural Communication -- 8.4 Conclusions -- References -- 9 Using Auxiliary Data for Adjustment in Longitudinal Research -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Missing Data -- 9.3 Calibration -- 9.4 Calibrating Multiple Waves -- 9.5 Differences Between Waves -- 9.6 Single Imputation -- 9.7 Multiple Imputation -- 9.8 Conclusion and Discussion -- References -- 10 Identifying Factors Affecting Longitudinal Survey Response -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Factors Affecting Response and Attrition -- 10.2.1 Locating the Sample Member -- 10.2.2 Contacting the Sample Member -- 10.2.3 Obtaining the Cooperation of the Sample Member -- 10.2.4 The Role of Respondent Characteristics -- 10.3 Predicting Response in the HILDA Survey -- 10.3.1 The HILDA Survey Data -- 10.3.2 Estimation Approach -- 10.3.3 Explanatory Variables -- 10.3.4 Results -- 10.4 Conclusion -- References -- 11 Keeping in Contact with Mobile Sample Members -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 The Location Problem in Panel Surveys -- 11.2.1 The Likelihood of Moving -- 11.2.2 The Likelihood of Being Located, Given a Move -- 11.3 Case Study 1: Panel Study of Income Dynamics
11.4 Case Study 2: Health and Retirement Study -- 11.5 Discussion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 12 The Use of Respondent Incentives on Longitudinal Surveys -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Respondent Incentives on Cross-Sectional Surveys -- 12.2.1 Effects of Incentives on Response Rates on Mail Surveys -- 12.2.2 Effects of Incentives on Response Rates on Interviewer-Administered Surveys -- 12.2.3 Effects of Incentives on Sample Composition and Bias -- 12.2.4 Effects of Incentives on Data Quality -- 12.2.5 Summary: Effects of Incentives -- 12.3 Respondent Incentives on Longitudinal Surveys -- 12.4 Current Practice on Longitudinal Surveys -- 12.5 Experimental Evidence on Longitudinal Surveys -- 12.5.1 Previous Experiments on UK Longitudinal Surveys -- 12.5.2 British Household Panel Survey Incentive Experiment -- 12.6 Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 13 Attrition in Consumer Panels -- 13.1 Introduction -- 13.2 The Gallup Poll Panel -- 13.3 Attrition on the Gallup Poll Panel -- 13.3.1 Descriptive Analysis -- 13.3.2 Experiments -- 13.3.3 Logistic Regression -- 13.3.4 A Serendipitous Finding: The Relationship Between Type of Survey and Attrition -- 13.4 Summary -- References -- 14 Joint Treatment of Nonignorable Dropout and Informative Sampling for Longitudinal Survey Data -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Population Model -- 14.3 Sampling Design and Sample Distribution -- 14.3.1 Theorem 1 -- 14.3.2 Theorem 2 -- 14.4 Sample Distribution Under Informative Sampling and Informative Dropout -- 14.5 Sample Likelihood and Estimation -- 14.5.1 Two-Step Estimation -- 14.5.2 Pseudo Likelihood Approach -- 14.6 Empirical Example: British Labour Force Survey -- 14.7 Conclusions -- References -- 15 Weighting and Calibration for Household Panels -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 Follow-up Rules -- 15.2.1 Population Definitions -- 15.2.2 Samples and Follow-up
15.3 Design-Based Estimation -- 15.3.1 The Horvitz-Thompson Estimator -- 15.3.2 Link Functions -- 15.3.3 Convexity and Variance of the Weighted Estimator -- 15.4 Calibration -- 15.4.1 Types of Calibration within Panels -- 15.4.2 Bias and Variance -- 15.5 Nonresponse and Attrition -- 15.5.1 Empirical Evidence Regarding Nonresponse and Attrition -- 15.5.2 Treatment via Model-Based Prediction -- 15.5.3 Treatment via Estimation of Response Probabilities -- 15.6 Summary -- References -- 16 Statistical Modelling for Structured Longitudinal Designs -- 16.1 Introduction -- 16.2 Methodological Framework -- 16.3 The Data -- 16.4 Modelling One Response from One Cohort -- 16.5 Modelling One Response from More Than One Cohort -- 16.6 Modelling More Than One Response from One Cohort -- 16.7 Modelling Variation Between Generations -- 16.8 Conclusion -- References -- 17 Using Longitudinal Surveys to Evaluate Interventions -- 17.1 Introduction -- 17.2 Interventions, Outcomes and Longitudinal Data -- 17.2.1 Form of the Intervention -- 17.2.2 Types of Effects -- 17.2.3 Conditions for the Evaluation -- 17.2.4 Controlling for Confounders in the Analysis -- 17.2.5 Value of Longitudinal Surveys -- 17.3 Youth Media Campaign Longitudinal Survey -- 17.4 National Survey of Parents and Youth -- 17.5 Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) -- 17.6 Concluding Remarks -- References -- 18 Robust Likelihood-Based Analysis of Longitudinal Survey Data with Missing Values -- 18.1 Introduction -- 18.2 Multiple Imputation for Repeated-Measures Data -- 18.3 Robust MAR Inference with a Single Missing Outcome -- 18.4 Extensions of PSPP to Monotone and General Patterns -- 18.5 Extensions to Inferences Other than Means -- 18.6 Example -- 18.7 Discussion -- Acknowledgements -- References
19 Assessing the Temporal Association of Events Using Longitudinal Complex Survey Data
Longitudinal surveys are surveys that involve collecting data from multiple subjects on multiple occasions. They are typically used for collecting data relating to social, economic, educational and health-related issues and they serve as an important tool for economists, sociologists, and other researchers. Focusing on the design, implementation and analysis of longitudinal surveys, Methodology of Longitudinal Surveys discusses the current state of the art in carrying out these surveys. The book also covers issues that arise in surveys that collect longitudinal data via retrospective methods. Aimed at researchers and practitioners analyzing data from statistical surveys the book will also be suitable as supplementary reading for graduate students of survey statistics. This book: Covers all the main stages in the design, implementation and analysis of longitudinal surveys. Reviews recent developments in the field, including the use of dependent interviewing and mixed mode data collection. Discusses the state of the art in sampling, weighting and non response adjustment. Features worked examples throughout using real data. Addresses issues arising from the collection of data via retrospective methods, as well as ethical issues, confidentiality and non-response bias. Is written by an international team of contributors consisting of some of the most respected Survey Methodology experts in the field
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Lynn, Peter Methodology of Longitudinal Surveys New York : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2009 9780470018712
Subject Social sciences -- Longitudinal studies.;Surveys -- Methodology
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