Record:   Prev Next
Author Redbooks, IBM
Title Designing and Optimizing an IBM Storage Area Network
Imprint Durham : I B M, 2002
©2002
Descript 1 online resource (536 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Front cover -- Contents -- Notices -- Trademarks -- Preface -- The team that wrote this redbook -- Notice -- Comments welcome -- Part 1 Back to basics -- Chapter 1. Identifying your business and technology goals -- 1.1 Not another SAN versus NAS discussion -- 1.1.1 SAN and NAS differentiating factors -- 1.1.2 Exploding some of the myths -- 1.2 Business and technological goals -- 1.2.1 Realizing the true potential of consolidated storage -- 1.2.2 Investment protection -- 1.3 Service levels -- 1.4 Disaster recovery and data protection -- 1.5 Performance -- 1.5.1 Logical scalability -- 1.5.2 Physical scalability -- 1.6 Resource sharing -- 1.7 Personnel -- 1.7.1 Areas of responsibility and ownership -- 1.7.2 Training -- 1.7.3 Setting the standard -- 1.8 Solution confidence -- 1.8.1 Supported and certified solutions -- 1.8.2 Best-of-breed -- 1.9 Rapid deployment, ability to accommodate change -- 1.10 Is it all worth it? -- 1.10.1 Gather all your input, and then gather some more -- 1.10.2 Focus on the identified business goals -- 1.10.3 Cost avoidance -- 1.10.4 Calculating ROI -- Chapter 2. Constituent parts of a SAN -- 2.1 Hardware -- 2.1.1 Host Bus Adapters -- 2.1.2 Bridges and SAN Data Gateways -- 2.1.3 Arbitrated Loop hubs -- 2.1.4 Switched hubs -- 2.1.5 Switches -- 2.1.6 Core switches -- 2.1.7 Directors -- 2.1.8 Storage considered as legacy -- 2.1.9 Cabling -- 2.1.10 Dark Fiber -- 2.1.11 Connectors -- 2.1.12 GBICs, GLMs, and transceivers -- 2.1.13 ASICs -- 2.1.14 SerDes -- 2.1.15 Backplane and blades -- 2.1.16 Test gear -- 2.2 Concepts -- 2.2.1 Classes of service -- 2.2.2 Topologies -- 2.2.3 Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) -- 2.3 Standards -- 2.3.1 SAN industry associations and organizations -- 2.3.2 Storage Networking Industry Association -- 2.3.3 Fibre Channel Industry Association -- 2.3.4 The SCSI Trade Association
2.3.5 InfiniBand (SM) Trade Association -- 2.3.6 National Storage Industry Consortium -- 2.3.7 Internet Engineering Task Force -- 2.3.8 American National Standards Institute -- 2.4 Addressing -- 2.4.1 World Wide Name -- 2.4.2 Port address -- 2.4.3 24-bit port addresses -- 2.4.4 Loop address -- 2.5 Fabric services -- 2.5.1 Management service -- 2.5.2 Time service -- 2.5.3 Name services -- 2.5.4 Login service -- 2.5.5 Registered State Change Notification -- 2.6 Logins -- 2.6.1 Fabric login -- 2.6.2 Port login -- 2.6.3 Process login -- 2.7 Fabric Shortest Path First -- 2.7.1 What is FSPF? -- 2.7.2 How does FSPF work? -- 2.7.3 How does FSPF help? -- 2.7.4 What happens when there is more than one shortest path? -- 2.7.5 Can FSPF cause any problems? -- 2.7.6 100 MB/s -- 2.7.7 1 Gb/s, 2 Gb/s and beyond -- 2.7.8 FC-PH, FC-PH-2, and FC-PH-3 -- 2.7.9 Virtualization -- 2.7.10 Layers -- 2.8 Zoning -- 2.8.1 Hardware zoning -- 2.8.2 Software zoning -- 2.9 Trunking -- 2.10 Logical unit number -- 2.11 Multipathing -- 2.11.1 IBM Subsystem Device Driver -- 2.11.2 Frame filtering -- 2.11.3 Oversubscription -- 2.11.4 Congestion -- 2.11.5 Information units -- 2.11.6 The movement of data -- 2.11.7 Data encoding -- 2.12 Ordered Set, Frames, Sequences, and Exchanges -- 2.12.1 Ordered set -- 2.12.2 Frames -- 2.12.3 Sequences -- 2.12.4 Exchanges -- 2.12.5 Frames -- 2.12.6 "In order" and "out of order" -- 2.12.7 Latency -- 2.12.8 Time-outs -- 2.12.9 Buffers and credits -- 2.12.10 Ports -- 2.12.11 Heterogeneousness -- 2.12.12 Open Fiber Control: OFC or Non-OFC -- 2.13 Fibre Channel Arbitrated Loop (FC-AL) -- 2.13.1 Loop protocols -- 2.13.2 Fairness algorithm -- 2.13.3 Loop addressing -- 2.13.4 Private devices on NL_Ports -- 2.14 Factors and considerations -- 2.14.1 Limits -- 2.14.2 Security -- 2.14.3 Interoperability -- 2.14.4 Management -- 2.14.5 Fabric management methods
2.14.6 Long distance links -- 2.14.7 Backup windows -- 2.14.8 Restore/disaster recovery time -- Chapter 3. SAN fabric products -- 3.1 IBM SAN Data Gateway SCSI Tape Router -- 3.2 IBM SAN Data Gateway -- 3.3 IBM TotalStorage SAN Controller 160 -- 3.4 IBM Fibre Channel Storage Hub -- 3.4.1 Hub configuration -- 3.5 IBM TotalStorage SAN Managed Hub -- 3.6 IBM TotalStorage SAN Switch F08 -- 3.7 IBM TotalStorage SAN Switches, S08, and S16 -- 3.7.1 Product overview -- 3.7.2 IBM TotalStorage SAN Switch hardware components -- 3.7.3 IBM TotalStorage SAN Switch software features -- 3.8 IBM TotalStorage SAN Switch F16 -- 3.8.1 Product overview -- 3.8.2 Hardware components -- 3.8.3 Software specifications -- 3.8.4 Interoperability -- 3.9 IBM TotalStorage SAN Switch M12 -- 3.9.1 M12 description -- 3.9.2 M12 connectivity -- 3.9.3 Intelligence within the M12 -- 3.9.4 Open SAN management -- 3.9.5 Seamless upgrades and investment protection -- 3.10 INRANGE FC/9000 Fibre Channel Director -- 3.10.1 INRANGE Director product description -- 3.10.2 Supported attachments -- 3.10.3 Supported port types -- 3.10.4 Availability -- 3.10.5 Scalable capacity -- 3.11 McDATA ES-1000 Loop Switch -- 3.11.1 Product description -- 3.11.2 High availability features -- 3.11.3 Concurrent firmware upgrades -- 3.11.4 Serviceability features -- 3.11.5 ES-1000 zoning -- 3.12 McDATA ES-3016 and ES-3032 Fabric Switches -- 3.12.1 Product description -- 3.12.2 High availability features -- 3.12.3 Setup configuration -- 3.12.4 Management software -- 3.12.5 Serviceability features -- 3.13 McDATA ED-6064 Director -- 3.13.1 Product description -- 3.13.2 Attachment -- 3.13.3 Planning for 2 Gb/s -- 3.13.4 Port types -- 3.13.5 Scalable configuration options -- Chapter 4. SAN design considerations -- 4.1 What do you want to achieve with a SAN? -- 4.2 Existing resources needs and planned growth
4.2.1 Collecting the data about existing resources -- 4.2.2 Planning for future needs -- 4.2.3 Platforms and storage -- 4.3 Select the core design for your environment -- 4.3.1 Selecting the topology -- 4.3.2 Scalability -- 4.3.3 Performance -- 4.3.4 Redundancy and resiliency -- 4.4 Host connectivity and Host Bus Adapters -- 4.4.1 Selection criterion -- 4.4.2 Emulex -- 4.4.3 JNI -- 4.4.4 QLogic -- 4.4.5 Multipathing software -- 4.4.6 Storage sizing -- 4.4.7 Management software -- 4.5 Director class or switch technology -- 4.6 General considerations -- 4.6.1 Ports and ASICs -- 4.6.2 Class F -- 4.6.3 Domain IDs -- 4.6.4 Zoning -- 4.6.5 Physical infrastructure and distance -- 4.7 Interoperability issues in the design -- 4.7.1 Certification and support -- 4.7.2 OEM/IBM mixes -- 4.8 Pilot and test the design -- 4.9 Management -- 4.9.1 SAN software management standards -- 4.9.2 Application management -- 4.9.3 Data management -- 4.9.4 Resource management -- 4.9.5 Network management -- 4.9.6 Element management -- 4.9.7 Fabric management methods -- Part 2 Case studies and solutions -- Chapter 5. Case studies -- 5.1 Case Study 1: Company One -- 5.1.1 Company profile -- 5.1.2 High-level business requirement(s) -- 5.1.3 Current infrastructure -- 5.1.4 Detailed requirements -- 5.1.5 Analysis (ports and throughput) -- 5.2 Case Study 2: Company Two -- 5.2.1 Company profile -- 5.2.2 High-level business requirement(s) -- 5.2.3 Current infrastructure -- 5.2.4 Detailed requirements -- 5.2.5 Analysis (ports and throughput) -- 5.3 Case Study 3: Company Three -- 5.3.1 Company profile -- 5.3.2 High-level business requirement(s) -- 5.3.3 Current infrastructure -- 5.3.4 Detailed requirements -- 5.3.5 Analysis (ports and throughput) -- 5.4 Case Study 4: Company Four -- 5.4.1 Company profile -- 5.4.2 High-level business requirement(s) -- 5.4.3 Current infrastructure
5.4.4 Detailed requirements -- 5.4.5 Analysis (ports and throughput) -- 5.5 Case Study 5: Company Five -- 5.5.1 Company profile -- 5.5.2 High-level business requirement(s) -- 5.5.3 Current infrastructure -- 5.5.4 Detailed requirements -- 5.5.5 Analysis (ports and throughput) -- 5.6 Case Study 6: Company Six -- 5.6.1 Company profile -- 5.6.2 High-level business requirement(s) -- 5.6.3 Current infrastructure -- 5.6.4 Detailed requirements -- 5.6.5 Analysis (ports and throughput) -- Chapter 6. IBM TotalStorage SAN Switch Solutions -- 6.1 Case Study 1: Company One -- 6.1.1 Switch design -- 6.1.2 Performance -- 6.1.3 Availability -- 6.1.4 Security -- 6.1.5 Distance -- 6.1.6 Scalability -- 6.1.7 "What if" failure scenarios -- 6.1.8 Manageability and management software -- 6.1.9 Core switch design -- 6.2 Case Study 2: Company Two -- 6.2.1 Design -- 6.2.2 Performance -- 6.2.3 Availability -- 6.2.4 Security -- 6.2.5 Distance -- 6.2.6 Scalability -- 6.2.7 "What if" failure scenarios -- 6.2.8 Manageability and management software -- 6.3 Case Study 3: Company Three -- 6.3.1 Design -- 6.3.2 Performance -- 6.3.3 Availability -- 6.3.4 Security -- 6.3.5 Distance -- 6.3.6 Scalability -- 6.3.7 "What if" failure scenarios -- 6.3.8 Manageability and management software -- 6.4 Case Study 4: Company Four -- 6.4.1 Design -- 6.4.2 Performance -- 6.4.3 Availability -- 6.4.4 Security -- 6.4.5 Distance -- 6.4.6 Scalability -- 6.4.7 "What if" failure scenarios -- 6.4.8 Manageability and management software -- 6.5 Case Study 5: Company Five -- 6.5.1 Design -- 6.5.2 Performance -- 6.5.3 Availability -- 6.5.4 Security -- 6.5.5 Distance -- 6.5.6 Scalability -- 6.5.7 "What if" failure scenarios -- 6.5.8 Manageability and management software -- 6.6 Case Study 6: Company Six -- 6.6.1 Design -- 6.6.2 Performance -- 6.6.3 Availability -- 6.6.4 Security -- 6.6.5 Distance
6.6.6 Scalability
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Redbooks, IBM Designing and Optimizing an IBM Storage Area Network Durham : I B M,c2002 9780738425313
Subject Storage area networks (Computer networks) -- Design and construction
Electronic books
Record:   Prev Next