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Author Yap, Foong Ha
Title Nominalization in Asian Languages : Diachronic and typological perspectives
Imprint Philadelphia : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2011
©2011
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (814 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Nominalization in Asian Languages -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Michael Noonan -- Table of contents -- Preface -- References -- Acknowledgment to reviewers -- List of contributors -- Introduction -- Nominalization strategies in Asian languages -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Nominalization types -- 2.1 Participant vs. event nominalization -- 2.2 Lexical vs. clausal nominalization -- 2.3 Embedded vs. non-embedded nominalization -- 3. Nominalization strategies -- 3.1 Morphological nominalization -- 3.2 Zero nominalization -- 3.3 Substantivization strategies -- 3.3.1 Case markers -- 3.3.2 Demonstratives and other definiteness markers -- 3.3.3 Possessive pronouns -- 3.3.4 Plural markers -- 3.3.5 Classifiers -- 3.3.6 Interim summary -- 3.4 Focusing strategies using marked argument structure -- 3.5 A closer look at the Austronesian strategy -- 4. Referential and non-referential uses of nominalization constructions -- 4.1 Nominalization and relativization -- 4.2 Nominalization and tense-aspect-mood marking -- 4.3 Nominalization and stance marking -- 4.4 Nominalization and clausal subordination -- 5. Conclusion and future directions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Part I Sinitic languages -- From light noun to nominalizer and more: -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The development of agent nominalizer zhe -- 2.1 Zhe as a light noun -- 2.2 Zhe as a derivational nominalizer -- 2.3 From light noun to clausal nominalizer -- 2.4 Rise and fall of adnominal uses of zhe -- 2.5 Rise and fall of possessee pronominal zhe -- 2.6 Subordinating functions of zhe -- 2.7 Sentence final mood particle uses of zhe -- 2.8 Summary on the development of zhe -- 3. The development of patient nominalizer suo -- 3.1 Suo as locative noun -- 3.2 From light noun to patient nominalizer -- 3.3 Subordinating functions of suo -- 3.3.1 Temporal and conditional subordinator suo
3.3.2 Manner, means and reason marker suo yi -- 3.3.3 Purposive complementizer suo yi -- 3.4 Possessee pronominal and genitive suo -- 3.5 Suo in passive constructions -- 3.5.1 From copula wei to case-marker and passive marker wei -- 3.5.3 Passive-wei constructions with suo -- 3.6 Summary -- 4. Some general observations -- Acknowledgments -- References -- On the polyfunctionality and grammaticalization of the morpheme kai in the Chaozhou dialect -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Typological features of the language -- 3. Functions of the morpheme kai -- 3.1 kai as a classifier -- 3.2 kai in adnominal functions -- 3.3 kai as a pronominal -- 3.4 kai in nominalization -- 3.4.1 Nominalizing derivatives -- 3.4.2 Nominalization with kai -- 3.5 kai as a stance marker -- 4. Grammaticalization of kai -- 5. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- The Cantonese ge3 -- 1. Introduction -- 2. An overview of the various usages of ge3 -- 2.1 Adnominal-ge3 -- 2.1.1 modifier-ge3] -noun -- 2.1.2 modifier-ge3]- Ø (nominal) -- 2.1.3 Conditionals and contrastive topic clauses -- 2.2 Sentence-final ge3 -- 2.2.1 Assertive-ge3 -- 2.2.2 predicative-ge3 -- 2.2.3 Interaction between assertive-ge3 and predicative-ge3 -- 3. Similarities between conditionals, contrastive topic clauses and assertive sentences -- 4. Ge3, gam2 and demonstratives -- 4.1 Ge3 and gam2 -- 4.2 Gam2 and demonstratives -- 4.3 Ge3 as a defective indexical -- 4.4 Ge3 and demonstratives -- 5. Conclusions -- Abbreviations -- Reference -- On gerundive nominalization in Mandarin and Cantonese -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Genitive agent nominals -- 3. Possessive objects -- 4. Relativation of idiomatic expressions -- 5. Verbless de expressions -- 6. Internal de expressions -- 7. Concluding remarks -- References -- Part II Tibeto-Burman languages -- Nominalization in Tibeto-Burman languages of the Himalayan area
1. Introduction -- 2. Typological Overview -- 3. Clausal nominalization -- 3.1 Complementation -- 3.2 Adverbial and medial clauses -- 3.3 Relative clauses and nominal complement clauses -- 3.4 Non-embedded nominalizations -- 3.5 Summary of clausal nominalization structures -- 4. Derivational nominalization -- 4.1 The derivation of lexical adjectives -- 4.2 Derivation of nouns -- 5. Summary and conclusions -- Abbreviations -- References -- Aspects of the historical development of nominalizers in the Tamangic languages -- 1. Tamangic languages -- 2. Tamangic verbal systems and nominalization -- 2.1 Interclausal relations in proto-Tamangic -- 2.2 Constructions with nominalizers -- 2.2.1 Adnominal clauses -- 2.2.2 Non-relative attributive nominals -- 2.2.3 Agent and patient nominals -- 2.2.4 Main clause verb with a mirative sense -- 3. Historical developments -- 3.1 The genitive with adnominals -- 3.1.1 The use of the genitive in the modern languages -- 3.1.2 Evaluation and discussion -- 3.2 The development of tense distinctions in nominalizations -- 3.2.1 The development of the anterior nominalization of Chantyal -- 3.2.2 Adnominal tense contrast in Nar-Phu -- 3.2.3 Adnominal tense contrast in Dhankute Tamang -- 3.2.4 Summary -- 3.3 New nominalizers -- 3.3.1 Nar-Phu -te -- 3.3.2 Nar-Phu -ne -- 3.4 Periphrastic constructions with nominalizers -- 4. Summary -- Abbreviations -- References -- Innovation in nominalization in Magar -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Magar typological sketch -- 3. Elaboration of nominalizers -- 3.1 Nominalizer -ke -- 3.2 Nominalizer -m% -- 3.3 Nominalizer -o -- 3.4 Nominalizer -cyo -- 3.5 Nominalizer me- -- 4. Extension of nominalizers -- 4.1 Extension of the nominalizer -ke -- 4.2 Extension of the nominalizer -m% -- 4.3 Extension of the erstwhile nominalizer -o -- 4.4 Extension of the nominalizer -cyo
4.5 Extension of the nominalizer me- -- 5. Elimination of nominalizers -- 6. Cross-linguistic context -- Abbreviations -- References -- Nominalization and nominalization-based constructions in Galo -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Theoretical-typological preliminary -- 3. Grammatical sketch -- 4. Types of local nominalization -- 4.1 Zero-nominalization -- 4.2 Marked nominalization -- 5. Nominalization-based constructions -- 5.1 Nominalized clauses -- 5.1.1 "Full" nominalized clauses -- 5.1.1.1 Event (action) nominalizations -- 5.1.1.2 Noun complement clauses -- 5.1.2 "Gapped" nominalized clauses -- 5.1.3 Secondary nominalized clauses -- 5.2 Clausal nominalization -- 5.2.1 "Framing" and "backgrounding" clausal nominalization -- 5.2.2 "Final" clausal nominalization -- 5.2.3 Cleft/focus constructions -- 6. Looking further -- 6.1 Diachronic origins of Galo nominalizers -- 6.2 Diachronic extensions of Galo nominalizations -- 6.3 Relevant non-nominalization-based constructions in Galo -- 7. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- Nominalization in Numhpuk Singpho -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Numhpuk Singpho -- 3. Overview of nominalization in Numhpuk Singpho -- 4. Nominalizer: Hpa -- 5. Clausal nominalization -- 6. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- Nominalization in Nuosu Yi -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Derivational Nominalization -- 2.1 Argument nominalization -- 2.1.1 Nominalization of theme/patient -- 2.1.2 Abstract-noun nominalization -- 2.1.3 Manner and locative nominalization -- 2.2 Nominalization of predicates -- 3. Nominalization by the definiteness marker -- 3.1 Gerundives -- 3.2 Relative clauses -- 3.3 Stand-alone nominalization/focus clause -- 4. Nominalization by the complementizer ko33 -- 4.1 Verb complementation clauses with ko33 -- 4.2 Nominalization of clauses with ko33 -- 5. Conclusion -- References
Finite structures from clausal nominalization in Tibeto-Burman -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Phenomenon -- 3. Three case studies -- 3.1 Sunwar: Nominalization in action -- 3.1.1 A recently-innovated finite construction -- 3.1.2 New perfects -- 3.2 Kuki-Chin: Reconstructing a nominalized clause construction -- 4. The evidence of final particles -- 4.1 Classical Tibetan -- 4.2 Lolo-Burmese -- 5. Summary -- Abbreviations -- References -- Part III Iranian languages -- Linker, relativizer, nominalizer, tense-particle -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Ezafe in Northern Kurdish -- 2.1 The Ezafe in adnominal linking constructions -- 2.2 The demonstrative/anaphoric function of the Ezafe -- 2.3 The Tense Ezafe -- 2.4 Summary of Northern Kurdish -- 3. The Ezafe in Modern Persian -- 4. The forerunners to the Ezafe in Old Iranian: The relative pronoun hypothesis -- 5. Summary and conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- Part IV Korean and Japanese languages -- Nominalization and stance marking in Korean -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Nominalizers in Korean -- 2.1 Nominalizers in history -- 2.2 Nominalizers in Modern Korean -- 3. Functions of nominalizers -- 3.1 Referring functions -- 3.2 Expressive functions -- 3.2.1 Regular sentential endings -- 3.2.2 Bullet-point' sentential endings -- 4. Speaker-stance marking -- 4.1 Speaker-stance -- 4.2 Stance-marking by sentential endings -- 4.2.1 ci-endings: -ci, -ciyo, and -cyo -- 4.2.2 kes-endings -- 4.3 Mechanisms -- 4.3.1 ci: Emphasis and friendliness -- 4.3.2 kes: Emphasis, Conviction, Intention and Commitment -- 5. Conclusion -- Abbreviations -- References -- A case of non-derived stand-alone nominalization -- 1. Introduction -- 2. sa derivatives in modern Japanese -- 3. The history of -sa derivatives -- 3.1 Old Japanese (8th century) -- 3.2 Early Middle Japanese (9th-12th century)
3.3 Late Middle Japanese (13th-17th century)
In a number of East and South-East Asian languages, certain grammatical elements such as pronouns, generic nouns, or demonstratives (e.g. one, thing, this) have acquired additional pragmatic functions. Well-documented examples of this grammaticalization process are the Mandarin de, the Malay punya/nya/mia and the Japanese no (cf. Yap, Matthews et al. 2004); the grammaticalized element occurs in the sentence-final position encoding speaker's certainty about the proposition. A similar development has taken place in Abui (a Papuan language of Eastern Indonesia); markers describing speaker's attitude towards a proposition (evidentiality and assertion) are recruited from two sources: (i) demonstratives and (ii) the utterance verb ba 'say'
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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Yap, Foong Ha Nominalization in Asian Languages : Diachronic and typological perspectives Philadelphia : John Benjamins Publishing Company,c2011 9789027206770
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Alt Author Grunow-Hårsta, Karen
Wrona, Janick
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