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Author Laury, Ritva
Title Subordination in Conversation : A cross-linguistic perspective
Imprint Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2011
©2011
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (252 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Subordination in Conversation -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- List of contributors -- Introduction -- Functional explanations for language phenomena -- The focus of this book - 'Subordination' -- Contents of the volume -- Contribution to subordination research and future directions -- References -- N be that-constructions in everyday German conversation -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Uses of N be that-constructions in German -- 2.1 'die Sache ist/das Ding ist'-utterances followed by a subordinate clause introduced with the subjunctor 'dass' -- 2.2 'die Sache ist/das Ding ist'-utterances followed by a main clause -- 2.3. 'die Sache ist/das Ding ist'-utterances followed by a complex stretch of discourse -- 3. Conclusions -- References -- Appendix: Transcription conventions (based on GAT) -- Interrogative "complements" and question design in Estonian -- Introduction -- The data -- Projecting actions 1: The imperative of 'say' -- Projecting actions 2: The imperative of 'tell, talk' -- Marking intersubjective uncertainty: The negation of 'know' -- Marking topical continuity across sequences: The adjective 'interesting' -- Conclusion -- References -- Transcription and glossing conventions -- Syntactic and actional characteristics of Finnish että-clauses -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Data -- 3. The use of että with complement-taking predicates -- 4. Että as an utterance-initial particle -- 5. The turn-final että -- 6. Discussion -- 7. Conclusions -- References -- Appendix 1 -- Appendix 2 -- Clause-combining and the sequencing of actions -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Data, procedure and the grammatical patterns under discussion -- 3. Clause-combining, projection and the sequencing of actions -- 3.1 Projection -- 3.2 'Je veux dire' -- 3.3 'Il y a+NP' ('there is+NP') -- 3.4 Pseudocleft-like constructions
3.5 Summary and initial discussion of the findings -- 4. Projector constructions and the construction of complex turns -- 4.1. 'Je veux dire' projector constructions in complex turns -- 4.2 'Il y a NP' projector constructions in complex turns -- 4.3 'ce qui/ce que x' (wh-clause) projector constructions in complex turns -- 5. Discussion: Projector constructions and the temporal unfolding of talk-in-interaction -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Symbols used in transcripts -- Symbols used in the gloss -- A note on the emergence of quotative constructions in Japanese conversation -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Background and hypothesis -- 3. Data -- 4. Observation of the early occurrences of tte in the 1800s -- 4.1 Tte clause as dependent clause: Quotative complement with tte, followed by a main clause -- 4.2 Tte clause as independent clause: Quotative tte in utterance-final positions -- 5. Final remarks -- Acknowledgements -- Abbreviations -- Text references -- References -- Clines of subordination - constructions with the German 'complement-taking predicate' glauben -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The data -- 3. From matrix clause to discourse marker -- 4. From matrix clause to increment -- 5. From matrix clause to modal particle -- 6. Clines of subordination: A discussion of the results -- 7. Phrases with glauben as instances of fragmentary language -- Literature -- Are kara 'because'-clauses causal subordinate clauses in present-day Japanese? -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Data -- 3. Background -- 3.1 Cline of clause-combining constructions in grammaticalization -- 3.2 Previous studies on the history of kara-clauses -- 3.3 Previous studies on kara-clauses in present-day Japanese -- 4. The diachronic process in kara-clauses -- 4.1. Clause combination -- 4.2 Interpretations of kara-clauses -- 4.3 Summary of the diachronic process of kara-clauses -- 5. Discussion
6. Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Abbreviations -- References -- Teyuuka and I mean as pragmatic parentheticals in Japanese and English -- 1. Introduction. -- 2. Data -- 3. The structure and function of I mean -- 3.1 The syntactic environments of I mean -- 3.2 The pragmatic function of I mean -- 4. Structure and Function of teyuuka -- 4. 1 The syntactic environments of teyuuka -- 4.2 Pragmatic functions of teyuuka -- 5. Discussion and conclusion -- References -- Name index -- Subject index
The English I mean and the Japanese teyuuka differ syntactically and semantically, but they have similar pragmatized uses. Both verbs, mean and yuu, function as regular verbs in main clauses and also as part of formulaic expressions which indicate a modal meaning with respect to an utterance, or project back to an earlier utterance and index it as inadequate or in need of modification. Both constructions can also frame another expression as a modification of the earlier utterance. They also function metacommunicatively to manage the interaction on a strategic level. The article compares the structure and functions of these two constructions in conversation and shows how structurally different expressions used in certain kinds of discourse and interactional contexts have come to serve similar but not identical pragmatic needs
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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Laury, Ritva Subordination in Conversation : A cross-linguistic perspective Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company,c2011 9789027226341
Subject Success -- Psychological aspects.;Thought and thinking
Electronic books
Alt Author Suzuki, Ryoko
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