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Author Kolasinski, Kurt W
Title Surface Science : Foundations of Catalysis and Nanoscience
Imprint Somerset : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2012
©2012
book jacket
Edition 3rd ed
Descript 1 online resource (576 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Intro -- Surface Science -- Contents -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- I.1 Heterogeneous catalysis -- I.2 Why surfaces? -- I.3 Where are heterogeneous reactions important? -- I.3.1 Haber-Bosch process -- I.3.2 Fischer-Tropsch chemistry -- I.3.3 Three-way catalyst -- I.4 Semiconductor processing and nanotechnology -- I.5 Other areas of relevance -- I.6 Structure of the book -- References -- 1 Surface and Adsorbate Structure -- 1.1 Clean surface structure -- 1.1.1 Ideal flat surfaces -- 1.1.2 High index and vicinal planes -- 1.1.3 Faceted surfaces -- 1.1.4 Bimetallic surfaces -- 1.1.5 Oxide and compound semiconductor surfaces -- 1.1.6 The carbon family: Diamond, graphite, graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes -- 1.1.7 Porous solids -- 1.2 Reconstruction and adsorbate structure -- 1.2.1 Implications of surface heterogeneity for adsorbates -- 1.2.2 Clean surface reconstructions -- 1.2.3 Adsorbate induced reconstructions -- 1.2.4 Islands -- 1.2.5 Chiral surfaces -- 1.3 Band structure of solids -- 1.3.1 Bulk electronic states -- 1.3.2 Metals, semiconductors and insulators -- 1.3.3 Energy levels at metal interfaces -- 1.3.4 Energy levels at metal-semiconductor interfaces -- 1.3.5 Surface electronic states -- 1.3.6 Size effects in nanoscale systems -- 1.4 The vibrations of solids -- 1.4.1 Bulk systems -- 1.4.2 Nanoscale systems -- 1.5 Summary of important concepts -- 1.6 Frontiers and challenges -- 1.7 Further reading -- 1.8 Exercises -- References -- 2 Experimental Probes and Techniques -- 2.1 Ultrahigh vacuum -- 2.1.1 The need for UHV -- 2.1.2 Attaining UHV -- 2.2 Light and electron sources -- 2.2.1 Types of lasers -- 2.2.2 Atomic lamps -- 2.2.3 Synchrotrons -- 2.2.4 Free electron laser (FEL) -- 2.2.5 Electron guns -- 2.3 Molecular beams -- 2.3.1 Knudsen molecular beams -- 2.3.2 Free Jets -- 2.3.3 Comparison of Knudsen and supersonic beams
2.4 Scanning probe techniques -- 2.4.1 Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) -- 2.4.2 Scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS) -- 2.4.3 Atomic force microscopy (AFM) -- 2.4.4 Near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) -- 2.5 Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) -- Advanced Topic: LEED structure determination -- 2.6 Electron spectroscopy -- 2.6.1 X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) -- 2.6.2 Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) -- Advanced Topic: Multiphoton photoemission (MPPE) -- 2.6.3 Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) -- 2.6.4 Photoelectron microscopy -- 2.7 Vibrational spectroscopy -- 2.7.1 IR spectroscopy -- 2.7.2 Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) -- 2.8 Second harmonic and sum frequency generation -- 2.9 Other surface analytical techniques -- 2.10 Summary of important concepts -- 2.11 Frontiers and challenges -- 2.12 Further reading -- 2.13 Exercises -- References -- 3 Chemisorption, Physisorption and Dynamics -- 3.1 Types of interactions -- 3.2 Binding sites and diffusion -- 3.3 Physisorption -- Advanced Topic: Theoretical Description of Physisorption -- 3.4 Non-dissociative chemisorption -- 3.4.1 Theoretical treatment of chemisorption -- 3.4.2 The Blyholder model of CO chemisorption on a metal -- 3.4.3 Molecular oxygen chemisorption -- 3.4.4 The binding of ethene -- 3.5 Dissociative chemisorption: H2 on a simple metal -- 3.6 What determines the reactivity of metals? -- 3.7 Atoms and molecules incident on a surface -- 3.7.1 Scattering channels -- 3.7.2 Non-activated adsorption -- 3.7.3 Hard cube model -- 3.7.4 Activated adsorption -- 3.7.5 Direct versus precursor mediated adsorption -- 3.8 Microscopic reversibility in Ad/Desorption phenomena -- 3.9 The influence of individual degrees of freedom on adsorption and desorption -- 3.9.1 Energy exchange -- 3.9.2 PES topography and the relative efficacy of energetic components
3.10 Translations, corrugation, surface atom motions -- 3.10.1 Effects on adsorption -- 3.10.2 Connecting adsorption and desorption with microscopic reversibility -- 3.10.3 Normal energy scaling -- 3.11 Rotations and adsorption -- 3.11.1 Non-activated adsorption -- 3.11.2 Activated adsorption -- 3.12 Vibrations and adsorption -- 3.13 Competitive adsorption and collision induced processes -- Advanced Topic: High Energy Collisions -- 3.14 Classification of reaction mechanisms -- 3.14.1 Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism -- 3.14.2 Eley-Rideal mechanism -- 3.14.3 Hot atom mechanism -- 3.15 Measurement of sticking coefficients -- 3.16 Summary of important concepts -- 3.17 Frontiers and challenges -- 3.18 Further reading -- 3.19 Exercises -- References -- 4 Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Adsorption and Desorption -- 4.1 Thermodynamics of Ad/Desorption -- 4.1.1 Binding energies and activation barriers -- 4.1.2 Thermodynamic quantities -- 4.1.3 Some definitions -- 4.1.4 The heat of adsorption -- 4.2 Adsorption isotherms from thermodynamics -- 4.3 Lateral interactions -- 4.4 Rate of desorption -- 4.4.1 First-order desorption -- 4.4.2 Transition state theory treatment of first-order desorption -- 4.4.3 Thermodynamic treatment of first-order desorption -- 4.4.4 Non-first-order desorption -- 4.5 Kinetics of adsorption -- 4.5.1 CTST approach to adsorption kinetics -- 4.5.2 Langmuirian adsorption: Non-dissociative adsorption -- 4.5.3 Langmuirian adsorption: Dissociative adsorption -- 4.5.4 Dissociative Langmuirian adsorption with lateral interactions -- 4.5.5 Precursor mediated adsorption -- 4.6 Adsorption isotherms from kinetics -- 4.6.1 Langmuir isotherm -- 4.6.2 Classification of adsorption isotherms -- 4.6.3 Thermodynamic measurements via isotherms -- 4.7 Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) -- 4.7.1 The basis of TPD -- 4.7.2 Qualitative analysis of TPD spectra
4.7.3 Quantitative analysis of TPD spectra -- 4.8 Summary of important concepts -- 4.9 Frontiers and challenges -- 4.10 Further reading -- 4.11 Exercises -- References -- 5 Liquid Interfaces -- 5.1 Structure of the liquid/solid interface -- 5.1.1 The structure of the water/solid interface -- 5.2 Surface energy and surface tension -- 5.2.1 Liquid surfaces -- 5.2.2 Curved interfaces -- 5.2.3 Capillary waves -- 5.3 Liquid films -- 5.3.1 Liquid-on-solid films -- 5.4 Langmuir films -- 5.5 Langmuir-Blodgett films -- 5.5.1 Capillary condensation and meniscus formation -- 5.5.2 Vertical deposition -- 5.5.3 Horizontal lifting (Shaefer's method) -- 5.6 Self assembled monolayers (SAMs) -- 5.6.1 Thermodynamics of self-assembly -- 5.6.2 Amphiphiles and bonding interactions -- 5.6.3 Mechanism of SAM formation -- Advanced Topic: Chemistry with Self Assembled Monolayers -- 5.7 Thermodynamics of liquid interfaces -- 5.7.1 The Gibbs model -- 5.7.2 Surface excess -- 5.7.3 Interfacial enthalpy and internal, Helmholtz and Gibbs surface energies -- 5.7.4 Gibbs adsorption isotherm -- 5.8 Electrified and charged interfaces -- 5.8.1 Surface charge and potential -- 5.8.2 Relating work functions to the electrochemical series -- 5.9 Summary of important concepts -- 5.10 Frontiers and challenges -- 5.11 Further reading -- 5.12 Exercises -- References -- 6 Heterogeneous Catalysis -- 6.1 The prominence of heterogeneous reactions -- 6.2 Measurement of surface kinetics and reaction mechanisms -- 6.3 Haber-Bosch process -- 6.4 From microscopic kinetics to catalysis -- 6.4.1 Reaction kinetics -- 6.4.2 Kinetic analysis using De Donder relations -- 6.4.3 Definition of the rate determining step (RDS) -- 6.4.4 Microkinetic analysis of ammonia synthesis -- 6.5 Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and related chemistry -- 6.6 The three-way automotive catalyst -- 6.7 Promoters -- 6.8 Poisons
6.9 Bimetallic and bifunctional catalysts -- 6.10 Rate oscillations and spatiotemporal pattern formation -- Advanced Topic: Cluster assembled catalysts -- 6.11 Sabatier analysis and optimal catalyst selection -- 6.12 Summary of important concepts -- 6.13 Frontiers and challenges -- 6.14 Further reading -- 6.15 Exercises -- References -- 7 Growth and Epitaxy -- 7.1 Stress and strain -- 7.2 Types of interfaces -- 7.2.1 Strain relief -- 7.3 Surface energy, surface tension and strain energy -- 7.4 Growth modes -- 7.4.1 Solid-on-solid growth -- 7.4.2 Strain in solid-on-solid growth -- 7.4.3 Ostwald ripening -- 7.4.4 Equilibrium overlayer structure and growth mode -- 7.5 Nucleation theory -- 7.6 Growth away from equilibrium -- 7.6.1 Thermodynamics versus dynamics -- 7.6.2 Non-equilibrium growth modes -- 7.7 Techniques for growing layers -- 7.7.1 Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) -- 7.7.2 Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) -- 7.7.3 Ablation techniques -- 7.8 Catalytic growth of nanotubes and nanowires -- 7.9 Etching -- 7.9.1 Classification of etching -- 7.9.2 Etch morphologies -- 7.9.3 Porous solid formation -- 7.9.4 Silicon etching in aqueous fluoride solutions -- 7.9.5 Coal gasification and graphite etching -- 7.9.6 Selective area growth and etching -- Advanced Topic: Si Pillar Formation -- 7.10 Summary of important concepts -- 7.11 Frontiers and challenges -- 7.12 Further reading -- 7.13 Exercises -- References -- 8 Laser and Non-Thermal Chemistry: Photon and Electron Stimulated Chemistry and Atom Manipulation -- 8.1 Photon excitation of surfaces -- 8.1.1 Light absorption by condensed matter -- 8.1.2 Lattice heating -- Advanced Topic: Temporal evolution of electronic excitations -- 8.1.3 Summary of laser excitations -- 8.2 Mechanisms of electron and photon stimulated processes -- 8.2.1 Direct versus substrate mediated processes -- 8.2.2 Gas phase photochemistry
8.2.3 Gas phase electron stimulated chemistry
Surface science has evolved from being a sub-field of chemistry or physics, and has now established itself as an interdisciplinary topic. Knowledge has developed sufficiently that we can now understand catalysis from a surface science perspective. No-where is the underpinning nature of surface science better illustrated than with nanoscience. Now in its third edition, this successful textbook aims to provide students with an understanding of chemical transformations and the formation of structures at surfaces. The chapters build from simple to more advanced principles with each featuring exercises, which act not only to demonstrate concepts arising in the text but also to form an integral part of the book, with the last eight chapters featuring worked solutions. This completely revised and expanded edition features: More than 100 new pages of extensive worked solutions New topics, including: Second harmonic generation (SHG), Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) at interfaces and capillary waves An expanded treatment of charge transfer and carbon-based materials including graphene Extended 'Frontiers and Challenges' sections at the end of each chapter. This text is suitable for all students taking courses in surface science in Departments of Chemistry, Physics, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, as well as for researchers and professionals requiring an up-to-date review of the subject
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Kolasinski, Kurt W. Surface Science : Foundations of Catalysis and Nanoscience Somerset : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2012 9781119990352
Subject Surface chemistry.;Surfaces (Physics);Catalysis.;Nanoscience
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