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Author Ingham, Richard
Title Transmission of Anglo-Norman : Language History and Language Acquisition
Imprint Philadelphia : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2012
©2012
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (191 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series Language Faculty and Beyond ; v.9
Language Faculty and Beyond
Note The Transmission of Anglo-Norman -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Table of contents -- Preface -- 1. Introduction to key issues -- 1.1 The research problem -- 1.2 Anglo-Norman and second language transmission -- 1.3 Language transmission -- 1.4 The critical period hypothesis and second language acquisition -- 1.5 Early child bilingualism -- Notes -- 2. Anglo Norman and L2 varieties of medieval French -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 An outline sketch of early C13 A-N grammar -- 2.3 Old French as an L2 in southern Italy -- 2.4 Law French as an L2 -- 2.5 Prospects -- Notes -- 3. The context of transmission -- 3.1 Previous interpretations -- 3.2 The historical evidence for the status of A-N -- 3.3 The elementary school as a context of first exposure to Anglo-Norman -- 3.4 Implications -- Notes -- 4. Rationale and design of the study -- 4.1 Initial considerations -- 4.2 Target areas of medieval French -- 4.3 Data sources -- 4.4 Design of the syntax study corpus -- 4.5 Additional data sources -- 4.6 Overall approach -- 5. Anglo-Norman phonology -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Acquisition target properties -- 5.3 Variation and change in OFr phonology -- 5.4 Influence of English: vowels -- 5.5 Influence of English: consonants -- 5.6 Loss of sound contrasts in A-N or underspecification in rhymes? -- 5.7 Investigating neutralisation -- 5.8 Results -- 5.9 Summary of findings and implications -- Notes -- 6. The syntax of quantifiers in Anglo-Norman -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Acquisition target properties: Old French quantifiers -- 6.3 Diachronic developments in the Old French quantifier system -- 6.4 A comparison with Middle English -- 6.5 An investigation of quantifier syntax in Anglo-Norman -- 6.6 Implications -- Notes -- 7. Noun gender marking in Anglo-Norman -- 7.1 L2 gender acquisition background -- 7.2 Acquisition target properties
7.3 Gender in AN: previous research -- 7.4 Gender marking in the AN Hub textbase: findings from possessive determiner contexts -- 7.5 Implications -- Notes -- 8. Verb second and null subjects in Anglo-Norman -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Acquisition target properties in OFr.: V2 and null subjects -- 8.3 A comparison with Middle English -- 8.4 Investigating the maintenance and loss of V2 in Anglo-Norman -- 8.5 V2 after selected initial adverbs in main clauses -- 8.6 V2 with initial Objects versus initial Adjuncts -- 8.7 Null subjects in subordinate clauses -- 8.8 Implications -- Notes -- 9. The order of Attributive Adjective and Noun in Anglo-Norman -- 9.1 Overview -- 9.2 Attributive Adjective - Noun order in medieval English and French -- 9.3 Acquisition target properties -- 9.4 Anglo-Norman attributive adjective position -- 9.5 Adjective syntax in north-eastern French dialects -- 9.6 Interpretation -- Notes -- 10. The syntax and pragmatics of discourse particles in Anglo-Norman -- 10.1 Discourse particles as a target of acquisition -- 10.2 Target properties of the Old French particle si -- 10.3 Data sources and analysis of particle si -- 10.4 Target properties of the discourse connectives ainz and mes in Old French -- 10.5 A comparison with Middle English -- 10.6 The connectives ainz and mes in Anglo-Norman -- 10.7 Implications -- Notes -- 11. Conclusions -- 11.1 Overview of results -- 11.2 Two discontinuities in transmission -- 11.3 Envoi -- Note -- Bibliography -- Name index -- Subject index
This investigation contributes to issues in the study of second language transmission by considering the well-documented historical case of Anglo-Norman. Within a few generations of the establishment of this variety, its phonology diverged sharply from that of continental French, yet core syntactic distinctions continued to be reliably transmitted. The dissociation of phonology from syntax transmission is related to the age of exposure to the language in the experience of ordinary users of the language. The input provided to children acquiring language in a naturalistic communicative setting, even though one of a school institution, enabled them to acquire target-like syntactic properties of the inherited variety. In addition, it allowed change to take place along the lines of transmission by incrementation. A linguistic environment combining the 'here-and-now' aspects of ordinary first language acquisition with the growing cognitive complexity of an educational meta-language appears to have been adequate for this variety to be transmitted as a viable entity that encoded the public life of England for centuries
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Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Ingham, Richard Transmission of Anglo-Norman : Language History and Language Acquisition Philadelphia : John Benjamins Publishing Company,c2012 9789027208262
Subject Transition metal catalysts.;Carbenes (Methylene compounds) -- Reactivity
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