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Author Dabby, Ramsey
Title Structure for Architects : A Primer
Imprint Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2012
©2011
book jacket
Edition 1st ed
Descript 1 online resource (275 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Cover -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Contents -- Preface -- Chapter 1 Architects, Engineers, and Design -- Chapter 2 Stability and Strength -- Chapter 3 Loads -- 3.1 Gravity Loads -- 3.2 Lateral Loads -- 3.3 Dynamic Loads -- 3.4 Impact Loads -- 3.5 Load Paths -- Chapter 4 States of Stress -- 4.1 Tension -- 4.2 Compression -- 4.3 Shear -- 4.4 Torsion -- 4.5 Bending -- Chapter 5 Forces, Movement, Levers, and Moment -- 5.1 Applied and Reactive Forces -- 5.2 Translational Movement -- 5.3 Rotational Movement -- 5.4 Levers -- 5.5 Moment -- Chapter 6 Stability and Equilibrium -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Translational Equilibrium -- 6.3 Rotational Equilibrium -- 6.4 Sign Conventions -- 6.5 The Equilibrium Equations -- 6.6 Free-Body Diagrams and Familiar Examples of Equilibrium -- 6.7 Introduction to Bending in Beams -- Chapter 7 Working with Forces -- 7.1 Forces, Vectors, and Lines of Action -- Principle of Transmissibility -- Collinear Forces -- Parallel Forces -- Concurrent Forces -- 7.2 Combining and Resolving Concurrent Forces -- Resultant, Component, and Equilibrant Forces -- The Parallelogram Method of Combining and Resolving Forces -- The Polygon Method of Combining Forces -- 7.3 Familiar Examples of Concurrent Forces -- Chapter 8 Supports, Reactions, and Restraint of Movement -- 8.1 Roller and Frictionless-Surface Supports -- Reaction on a Member -- Restraint of Movement -- 8.2 Pinned Supports -- Graphic Representation -- Reactions on a Member -- Restraint of Movement -- 8.3 Fixed Supports -- Graphic Representation -- Reaction on a Member -- Restraint of Movement -- 8.4 Hanger Supports -- Reaction on a Member -- Restraint of Movement -- 8.5 Familiar Examples of Support Conditions -- 8.6 Stable or Unstable? -- Chapter 9 Load Distribution -- 9.1 Point Loads -- 9.2 Distributed Loads -- 9.3 Equivalent Point Loads -- 9.4 Uniformly Distributed Loads
9.5 Non-Uniformly Distributed Loads -- Chapter 10 Introduction to Beams -- 10.1 Beam Types -- 10.2 Predicting Deformation, Deflection, and Beam Behavior -- 10.3 Statically Determinate and Statically Indeterminate Beams -- 10.4 Other Considerations for Beams -- Approximate Span-to-Depth Ratios -- Lateral Buckling -- Lateral Bracing -- Web Stiffening -- Chapter 11 Framing Systems and Load Tributary Areas -- 11.1 One-Way Systems -- 11.2 Two-Way Slab and Beam Systems -- 11.3 Two-Way Slab/Two-Way Joist Systems -- Chapter 12 Shear and Moment Diagrams for Beams -- 12.1 Sign Conventions -- For Shear -- For Moment -- 12.2 Typical Shear and Moment Diagrams -- For a Simply Supported Beam -- For a Fixed-end Beam -- For a Simply Supported Beam with a Single Overhang -- 12.3 Creating Shear and Moment Diagrams -- 12.4 Comparing V and M for Uniformly Distributed Versus Concentrated Loading -- Free-body Diagram Comparison -- Deformation Curve Comparison -- Shear Diagram Comparison -- Moment Diagram Comparison -- 12.5 Summary of Deformation, Shear, and Moment Relationships -- Deformation Curves -- Shear Diagrams -- Moment Diagrams -- Chapter 13 Stress, Strain, and Properties of Materials -- 13.1 Stress -- 13.2 Strain -- 13.3 Stress versus Strain -- 13.4 Properties of Materials -- 13.5 Stress Distribution Diagrams -- Chapter 14 Introduction to Columns -- 14.1 Columns, Compression, and Bending -- 14.2 Column Loading -- 14.3 Column Compression -- 14.4 Column Bending -- Effective Length -- Radius of Gyration -- Slenderness Ratio -- 14.5 Leonhard Euler and Column Buckling -- Chapter 15 Frames, Rigidity, and Lateral Resistance Systems -- 15.1 Triangular Frames -- 15.2 Rectangular Frames -- 15.3 Making Rectangular Frames Rigid -- Triangulation -- Tensile Member Cross Bracing -- Moment Connections -- Shear Walls -- 15.4 Lateral Resistance Systems -- Lateral Resistance Methods
Understanding Braced Frames -- Diaphragms -- Chapter 16 Introduction to Trusses -- 16.1 Introduction -- 16.2 Trusses as Beams -- 16.3 Types of Trusses -- 16.4 Design Considerations -- Pitched, Arched, and Parallel Chord Trusses -- Span-to-Depth Ratios -- 16.5 Truss Joints -- 16.6 Truss Loading -- 16.7 Truss Analysis -- Truss Determinancy -- Assumptions and Conventions -- Chapter 17 Structural Walls -- 17.1 Loads and Deformational Stresses -- Vertical Gravity Loads -- Horizontal Lateral Loads -- 17.2 Stresses and Wall Construction -- Concrete and Masonry Walls -- Wood Stud Walls -- 17.3 Retaining Walls -- Site Slopes and Grades -- Angle of Repose of a Soil -- Soil Pressure -- Design Principles for Retaining Walls -- Gravity Retaining Walls -- Cantilever Retaining Walls -- Chapter 18 Soils and Rock -- 18.1 The Earth's Interior -- 18.2 The Earth's Crust -- Igneous Rock -- Sedimentary Rock -- Metamorphic Rock -- Rock Formations -- 18.3 Natural Soils -- 18.4 Groundwater -- 18.5 Engineered Fill -- 18.6 Foundation Settlement -- 18.7 Soil-Bearing Capacity and Subsurface Conditions -- Chapter 19 Foundations -- 19.1 Shallow Foundations -- Spread Footings -- Symmetrical and Asymmetrical Footing Loads -- Placement of Spread Footings -- Variations of Spread Footings -- General Design of Spread Footings -- 19.2 Deep Foundations -- Deep Foundations and Load Resistance -- Piles and Drilled Piers -- Pile Caps, Grade Beams, and Structural Slabs -- Chapter 20 Summing Up -- Creation of Stress -- States of Stress -- Resistance to Stress -- Appendix 1 Structural Forms -- Appendix 2 Structural Materials-Steel -- A2.1 Composition and Manufacture -- A2.2 Characteristics and Properties -- Advantages of Steel -- Disadvantages of Steel -- A2.3 The American Institute of Steel Construction -- A2.4 Grades of Structural Steel -- A2.5 Shapes and Forms
Hot-Rolled Structural Steel Sections -- Compact Steel Sections -- Open Web Steel Joists -- A2.6 Joining Steel -- Bolts -- Welds -- Rivets -- A2.7 Decking -- Metal Decking -- Concrete Decking -- A2.8 The Design/Fabrication/Erection Process -- A2.9 Related Terms -- Appendix 3 Structural Materials-Reinforced Concrete -- A3.1 Composition and Manufacture -- Basic Ingredients -- Admixtures -- Steel Reinforcing -- A3.2 Curing -- A3.3 Characteristics and Properties -- A3.4 Related Terms -- Appendix 4 Structural Materials-Wood -- A4.1 Source and Manufacture -- A4.2 Products -- Sawn Lumber -- Manufactured Lumber -- A4.3 Characteristics and Properties -- Advantages of Wood -- Disadvantages of Wood -- A4.4 Structural Considerations -- A4.5 Related Terms -- Appendix 5 Properties of Sections -- A5.1 Center of Gravity and Centroids -- Center of Gravity -- Centroid -- Centroidal (Neutral) Axes -- A5.2 Moment of Inertia -- Moment of Inertia for Rectangular Cross Sections -- Moment of Inertia for Various Steel Sections -- A5.3 Section Modulus -- Section Modulus and Elastic & Plastic Stage Design -- The Elastic Section Modulus, S -- The Plastic Section Modulus, Z -- Section Modulus, S and Z, for Rectangular Sections -- A5.4 Radius of Gyration -- Understanding Radius of Gyration -- Appendix 6 Basic Trigonometry -- A6.1 Basic Trigonometric Functions of a Right Triangle -- A6.2 Basic Trigonometric Values of Frequently Used Angles -- A6.3 Proportions of Special Right Triangles -- A6.4 The Pythagorean Theorem -- Index -- EULA
An introduction to the concepts and principles of architectural structures in an easy-to-read format Written as an easy-to-understand primer on the topic, Structure for Architects engages readers through instruction that uses a highly visual format and real-world examples to underline the key facets of structural principles that are essential to the design process. Eschewing complicated mathematics and technical jargon, Structure for Architects demystifies the subject matter by showing it in the context of everyday situations, giving architects and architectural technologists a clear understanding of how to incorporate structural principles into their designs. Highlights of this book include: A rich collection of drawings, photographs, and diagrams, spread throughout the text, which demonstrate fundamental structural concepts using everyday examples An overview of structural design basics, as well as a summary of structural forms A look at the design implications of steel, reinforced concrete, and wood By providing an overall view of structures that covers the essentials of what architects and architectural technologists need to know, Structure for Architects is a valuable tool for illustrating the importance of designing with structure in mind and for learning the basics that are necessary for collaborating confidently with project team members
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Dabby, Ramsey Structure for Architects : A Primer Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2012 9780470633762
Subject Architecture.;Structural engineering.;Thought and thinking
Electronic books
Alt Author Bedi, Ashwani
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