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020    9780816696949|q(electronic bk.) 
020    |z9780816645152 
035    (MiAaPQ)EBC322588 
035    (Au-PeEL)EBL322588 
035    (CaPaEBR)ebr10202567 
035    (CaONFJC)MIL522374 
035    (OCoLC)183401214 
040    MiAaPQ|beng|erda|epn|cMiAaPQ|dMiAaPQ 
050  4 B2430.L1464 -- L33 2006eb 
082 0  150.19/5092 
100 1  Labbie, Erin Felicia 
245 10 Lacan's Medievalism 
264  1 Minneapolis :|bUniversity of Minnesota Press,|c2006 
264  4 |c©2006 
300    1 online resource (280 pages) 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    computer|bc|2rdamedia 
338    online resource|bcr|2rdacarrier 
505 0  Intro -- Contents -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction: The 
       Unconscious Is Real -- ONE: Singularity, Sovereignty, and 
       the One -- TWO: Duality, Ambivalence, and the Animality of
       Desire -- THREE: Dialectics, Courtly Love, and the Trinity
       -- FOUR: The Quadrangle, the Hard Sciences, and 
       Nonclassical Thinking -- FIVE: The Pentangle and the 
       Resistant Knot -- Notes -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E 
       -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- 
       Q -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- Z 
520    One of the foundational premises of Jacques Lacan's 
       psychoanalytical project was that the history of 
       philosophy concealed the history of desire, and one of the
       goals of his work was to show how desire is central to 
       philosophical thinking. In Lacan's Medievalism, Erin 
       Felicia Labbie demonstrates how Lacan's theory of desire 
       is bound to his reading of medieval texts. She not only 
       alters the relationship between psychoanalysis and 
       medieval studies, but also illuminates the ways that 
       premodern and postmodern epochs and ideologies share a 
       concern with the subject, the unconscious, and language, 
       thus challenging notions of strict epistemological cuts. 
       Lacan's psychoanalytic work contributes to the medieval 
       debate about universals by revealing how the unconscious 
       relates to the category of the real. By analyzing the 
       systematic adherence to dialectics and the idealization of
       the hard sciences, Lacan's Medievalism asserts that we 
       must take into account the play of language and desire 
       within the unconscious and literature in order to 
       understand the way that we know things in the world and 
       the manner in which order is determined 
588    Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other
       sources 
590    Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest 
       Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access 
       may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated 
       libraries 
650  0 Lacan, Jacques, -- 1901-1981.;Psychoanalysis and 
       philosophy.;Medievalism.;Desire 
655  4 Electronic books 
776 08 |iPrint version:|aLabbie, Erin Felicia|tLacan's 
       Medievalism|dMinneapolis : University of Minnesota Press,
       c2006|z9780816645152 
856 40 |uhttps://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/sinciatw/
       detail.action?docID=322588|zClick to View