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005    20200713055252.0 
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007    cr cnu|||||||| 
008    200713s2013    xx      o     ||||0 eng d 
020    9781443852654|q(electronic bk.) 
020    |z9781443850278 
035    (MiAaPQ)EBC1477516 
035    (Au-PeEL)EBL1477516 
035    (CaPaEBR)ebr10778095 
035    (CaONFJC)MIL528684 
035    (OCoLC)859834125 
040    MiAaPQ|beng|erda|epn|cMiAaPQ|dMiAaPQ 
050  4 NB1275 -- .H34 2013eb 
082 0  347 
100 1  Hägele, Hannelore 
245 10 Colour in Sculpture :|bA Survey from Ancient Mesopotamia 
       to the Present 
250    1st ed 
264  1 Newcastle-upon-Tyne :|bCambridge Scholars Publisher,|c2013
264  4 |c©2013 
300    1 online resource (347 pages) 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    computer|bc|2rdamedia 
338    online resource|bcr|2rdacarrier 
505 0  Intro -- TABLE OF CONTENTS -- LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS -- 
       ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS -- INTRODUCTION -- CHAPTER ONE -- CHAPTER
       TWO -- CHAPTER THREE -- CHAPTER FOUR -- CHAPTER FIVE -- 
       CHAPTER SIX -- CHAPTER SEVEN -- CHAPTER EIGHT -- CHAPTER 
       NINE -- CHAPTER TEN -- CHAPTER ELEVEN -- SELECTED 
       BIBLIOGRAPHY -- INDEX 
520    This book introduces the reader to the art of sculpture 
       across five millennia up to the present, and from the Near
       East to the west. In each of the eleven chapters, a number
       of selected works are discussed to exemplify the 
       circumstances and conditions for making pieces of 
       sculpture - objects peculiar to place, time and context. 
       Within each cultural framework, characteristics are 
       observable that suggest various reasons for the use of 
       colour in sculpture. These encompass local preferences, 
       customs or cultural requirements; and others point to an 
       impulse to enhance the expression of the phenomenal. 
       Whether colour is really necessary or even essential to 
       sculpted works of art is a question especially pertinent 
       since the Renaissance. Surface finishes of sculptural 
       representations may allude to the sensory world of colour 
       without even having pigment applied to them. What makes 
       polychromy so special is that it functions as an overlay 
       of another dimension that sometimes carries further 
       encoded meaning. In nature, the colour is integral to the 
       given object. What the present survey suggests is that the
       relationship between colour and sculpture is a matter of 
       intentional expression, even where the colour is intrinsic
       - as in the sculptor's materials 
588    Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other
       sources 
590    Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest 
       Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access 
       may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated 
       libraries 
650  0 Polychromy 
655  4 Electronic books 
776 08 |iPrint version:|aHägele, Hannelore|tColour in Sculpture :
       A Survey from Ancient Mesopotamia to the Present
       |dNewcastle-upon-Tyne : Cambridge Scholars Publisher,c2013
       |z9781443850278 
856 40 |uhttps://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/sinciatw/
       detail.action?docID=1477516|zClick to View