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Author Clerc, Philippe
Title Strategic Intelligence for the Future 1 : A New Strategic and Operational Approach
Imprint Newark : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2019
©2019
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (253 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Cover -- Half-Title Page -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Preface -- Introduction -- I.1. An unstable world in search of intelligence -- I.2. Objectives -- I.3. Ambition and determination -- I.4. Originality of the book and innovation -- I.5. Structure of the book -- I.6. References -- 1. For a New Strategic and Competitive Intelligence -- 1.1. Our assessment -- 1.2. The present day -- 1.3. Tomorrow -- 1.4. Conclusion -- 1.5. References -- 2. Geopolitics and Strategic Intelligence -- 2.1. Principles of analysis -- 2.1.1. Getting to the point -- 2.1.2. Having an open mind -- 2.1.3. Knowing how to decode information -- 2.1.4. Learning how to sort through information -- 2.2. The evolving world -- 2.2.1. The increasing power of the individual -- 2.2.2. The evolution of power relationships -- 2.3. A changing world -- 2.3.1. International institutions -- 2.3.2. Bilateral agreements -- 2.4. Increased risks -- 2.4.1. Climate risks -- 2.4.2. Risks linked to resources -- 2.4.3. Medical risks -- 2.4.4. Natural risks -- 2.4.5. Political risks -- 2.4.6. Nuclear risks -- 2.4.7. Cyber risks -- 2.5. Conclusion -- 2.6. References -- 3. Competitive Intelligence Schools Across the World: Foundations, Influence and Perspectives -- 3.1. Introduction: what is the competitive intelligence school? -- 3.2. Visions that inspire schools of thought -- 3.2.1. "Power countries" -- 3.2.2. "Emerging countries" -- 3.3. The advent of the competitive intelligence schools -- 3.3.1. Geopolitical and geoeconomic framework -- 3.3.2. Doctrines -- 3.4. The "nourishing disciplines" of competitive intelligence and communities of public/private practice -- 3.4.1. Disciplines and "schools of practice" -- 3.4.2. The African and Chinese schools of competitive intelligence -- 3.5. Conclusion -- 3.6. References
4. Competitive Intelligence as a Vehicle for International Collaboration -- 4.1. The arrival of new signs -- 4.1.1. Definitions of competitive intelligence -- 4.1.2. Maintaining competitive advantages -- 4.2. Increasing instability -- 4.2.1. More developed countries -- 4.2.2. Low-income countries -- 4.3. The French example -- 4.4. Collaboration -- 4.4.1. The foundations of collaboration -- 4.4.2. Academic collaboration -- 4.4.3. Bilateral network collaborations -- 4.4.4. Collaboration between organizations -- 4.4.5. Collaborations through international institutions -- 4.4.6. Collaboration via chambers of commerce and industry -- 4.5. Conclusion -- 4.6. References -- 5. Regional Competitive Intelligence -- 5.1. What do we mean by territories? -- 5.1.1. Regional and international patterns of economic development and innovation -- 5.1.2. Intelligent specialization strategies -- 5.2. A typology of territories -- 5.3. Definition of territorial intelligence -- 5.4. The challenges of territorial intelligence -- 5.5. Rethinking our intelligence capabilities in territorial situations -- 5.5.1. Strategic coordination deficits -- 5.5.2. Needing to be organized -- 5.6. The intelligence of situations -- 5.6.1. The establishment of competitive and strategic regional facilities -- 5.6.2. The goals of these facilities -- 5.7. The main areas of intervention of this competitive intelligence and regional strategic facility or organization -- 5.8. The generic configuration of the facility -- 5.8.1. Regional strategic steering group (CRPS) -- 5.8.2. The interpretational group -- 5.8.3. The spotters -- 5.9. Strategic management approach: mapping and analysis tools -- 5.9.1. The map of key territory actors -- 5.9.2. Critical resources of a territory -- 5.9.3. The influence potential of a territory -- 5.10. Operational implementation -- 5.11. Conclusion -- 5.12. References
6. Influence -- 6.1. The current foundations of influence -- 6.2. Who is going to communicate? -- 6.3. Knowledge of the target and information -- 6.4. Rumors -- 6.5. The "media sounding board" -- 6.6. Cultural or public diplomacy -- 6.7. Positive influence -- 6.7.1. Influence, rumors and territorial attractiveness -- 6.7.2. Becoming attractive -- 6.8. Conclusion -- 6.9. References -- 7. Sphere of Influence -- 7.1. The return of geopolitics in the economic field -- 7.2. Power strategy and influence strategy -- 7.2.1. States -- 7.2.2. Companies -- 7.3. The sphere of influence: illustrations -- 7.3.1. Definitions -- 7.3.2. The sphere of influence of a company -- 7.3.3. The sphere of influence of a territory -- 7.4. Conclusion -- 7.5. References -- 8. Organizational Intelligence -- 8.1. Definition -- 8.2. Organizational intelligence and cognitive pathologies -- 8.2.1. The brakes of the organization -- 8.2.2. Corporate culture: both a brake and lever of organizational intelligence -- 8.3. An example: the US-Japan FSX Fighter program or "thinking out of the silos" -- 8.4. Organizational intelligence and strategies -- 8.4.1. Networks -- 8.4.2. Agile organizations -- 8.4.3. A network of experts -- 8.4.4. The culture of organizations: management of cognitive biases and vehicle for the creation of a knowledge base of the environment -- 8.4.5. Managing the culture of organizations -- 8.4.6. Learning organization -- 8.5. Collective intelligence and organization of sensor networks -- 8.6. Conclusion -- 8.7. References -- 9. From Military Intelligence to Competitive Intelligence -- 9.1. From the military to the economy -- 9.1.1. Military warfare -- 9.1.2. Integration of the economy -- 9.1.3. The priority of the economy -- 9.1.4. The economic army -- 9.2. Forms and aims of intelligence -- 9.2.1. The importance of intelligence -- 9.2.2. Economic intelligence
9.2.3. Global intelligence -- 9.2.4. Intelligence as global tool -- 9.3. The practice of intelligence -- 9.3.1. Intelligence for everyone -- 9.3.2. Weak and strong signals -- 9.3.3. The tools of intelligence -- 9.3.4. Sources of intelligence -- 9.3.5. Public/private collaboration in company intelligence -- 9.4. Intelligence and its cycle -- 9.4.1. Decoding what we might notice to understand reality -- 9.4.2. The intelligence cycle -- 9.4.3. Knowing oneself -- 9.4.4. Definition of the research framework -- 9.4.5. Prospective vision -- 9.4.6. The research plan -- 9.4.7. Collecting data -- 9.4.8. Data cross-checking -- 9.5. Analysis -- 9.6. The synthesis of information and its dissemination -- 9.6.1. From adequacy to expectations -- 9.7. Conclusion -- 9.8. References -- Conclusion -- Index -- Summary of Volume 2 -- Other titles from iSTE in Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Management -- EULA
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Clerc, Philippe Strategic Intelligence for the Future 1 : A New Strategic and Operational Approach Newark : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2019 9781786302311
Subject Strategic planning.
Business intelligence
Electronic books
Alt Author Dou, Henri
Juillet, Alain
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