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Author Sha, Kewei
Title Security, Privacy and Reliability in Computer Communications and Networks
Imprint Aalborg : River Publishers, 2017
©2017
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (446 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series River Publishers Series in Communications Ser
River Publishers Series in Communications Ser
Note Front Cover -- Half Title Page -- RIVER PUBLISHERS SERIES IN INNOVATION AND CHANGE IN EDUCATION - CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE -- Title Page - Security, Privacy and Reliability in Computer Communications and Networks -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- List of Contributors -- List of Figures -- List of Tables -- List of Algorithms -- List of Abbreviations -- PART I - Privacy -- Chapter 1 - Distributed Beamforming Relay Selection to Increase Base Station Anonymity in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks -- Abstract -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Anonymity Definition, Metrics, and Contemporary Measures -- 1.2.1 Anonymity Definition and Assessment -- 1.2.2 Antitraffic Analysis Measures -- 1.3 System Assumptions and Attack Model -- 1.3.1 Network Model -- 1.3.2 Adversary Model -- 1.3.3 Evidence Theory and Belief Metric -- 1.4 Distributed Beamforming to Increase the BS Anonymity -- 1.4.1 Overview of the DiBAN Protocol -- 1.4.2 DiBAN Illustrative Example -- 1.4.3 DiBAN Energy Analysis -- 1.5 Distributed Beamforming Relay Selection Approach -- 1.6 Validation Experiments -- 1.6.1 Simulation Environment -- 1.6.2 Simulation Results -- 1.7 Conclusions and FutureWork -- Appendix I: Numerical Evidence Theory Belief Calculation Example -- References -- Chapter 2 - A Privacy-Preserving and Efficient Information Sharing Scheme for VANET Secure Communication -- Abstract -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Related Works -- 2.3 System Model and Preliminaries -- 2.3.1 Network Model -- 2.3.2 Attack Model -- 2.3.3 Security Requirements -- 2.4 The Proposed PETS Scheme -- 2.4.1 Scheme Overview -- 2.4.2 System Initiation -- 2.4.3 Vehicle-RSU Key Agreement -- 2.4.4 Traffic Information Collection and Aggregation -- 2.4.5 Traffic Jam Message Propagation -- 2.5 Security Analysis -- 2.6 Performance Evaluation -- 2.6.1 Traffic Information Sending/Collection Overhead
2.6.2 Traffic Information Propagation/Verification Overhead -- 2.6.3 Scheme Simulation -- 2.7 Conclusion -- References -- PART II - Vulnerabilities, Detection and Monitoring -- Chapter 3 - DIAMoND: Distributed Intrusion/Anomaly Monitoring for Nonparametric Detection -- Abstract -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Literature Review -- 3.3 System Design -- 3.3.1 Architecture Overview -- 3.3.2 Detection Unit -- 3.3.3 Coordination Unit -- 3.3.4 Communication Protocol -- 3.3.5 Neighborhood Strategies -- 3.3.6 Rogue Nodes -- 3.4 Evaluation Setup -- 3.4.1 Software Implementation -- 3.4.2 Physical Topologies -- 3.4.3 Legitimate and Malicious Traffic -- 3.5 Emulation Results -- 3.5.1 Detection Accuracy -- 3.5.2 Impact of Physical Topologies -- 3.5.3 Influence of Neighborhood Strategies -- 3.5.4 Minimal and Marginal Deployment Gain -- 3.6 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 4 - Detection of Service Level Agreement (SLA) Violations in Memory Management in Virtual Machines -- Abstract -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Related Work -- 4.2.1 Information Leakage among Virtual Machines -- 4.2.2 Service Level Agreement Enforcement -- 4.3 The Proposed Approaches -- 4.3.1 Memory Overcommitment in Virtualization Environments -- 4.3.2 Memory Deduplication in VM Hypervisors -- 4.3.3 System Assumptions -- 4.3.4 Basic Ideas of the Proposed Approaches -- 4.3.5 Details of Implementation -- 4.3.5.1 Choice of memory pages -- 4.3.5.2 Measurement of access time -- 4.3.5.3 Verification of memory access order -- 4.3.6 Detection Procedures of the SLA Violations -- 4.4 Experimental Results -- 4.4.1 Experimental Environment Setup -- 4.4.2 Experiments and Results -- 4.4.3 Impacts on System Performance -- 4.5 Discussion -- 4.5.1 Reducing False Alarms -- 4.5.2 Impacts of Extra Memory Demand -- 4.5.3 Building A Unified Detection Algorithm -- 4.6 Conclusion -- References
Chapter 5 - Analysis of Mobile Threats and Security Vulnerabilities for Mobile Platforms and Devices -- Abstract -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Analysis of Mobile Platforms -- 5.2.1 Dominating Mobile Platforms -- 5.2.1.1 iPhone Operating System (iOS) -- 5.2.1.2 Android operating system (Android) -- 5.2.1.3 BlackBerry operating system -- 5.2.2 Security Models for Mobile Platforms -- 5.2.2.1 iOS security model -- 5.2.2.2 Android security model -- 5.2.2.3 BlackBerry security model -- 5.2.3 Existing Security Vulnerabilities in Mobile Platforms -- 5.2.3.1 Potential vulnerabilities -- 5.2.3.2 Mobile device malware -- 5.3 Threat Model for Mobile Platforms -- 5.3.1 Goals and Motives for an Attacker -- 5.3.1.1 Cybercriminals: outsourcing sensitive data -- 5.3.1.2 Cybercriminals: cyber heist -- 5.3.1.3 Cybercriminals: corporate espionage and sabotage -- 5.3.2 Attack Vectors or Modern Exploitation Techniquesfor Mobile Devices -- 5.3.2.1 Susceptibility on the mobile through hardware -- 5.3.2.2 Attacking through theWeb -- 5.3.2.3 Mobile intrusion and deception through social engineering -- 5.3.2.4 Attacking through the mobile network -- 5.3.2.5 Cyber Arson through common mobile applications -- 5.3.2.6 Attacking via Bluetooth connection -- 5.3.3 Types of Malwares in Mobile Devices -- 5.3.3.1 Trojan-related malware -- 5.3.3.2 Worms targeting mobile devices -- 5.3.3.3 Viruses on the mobile -- 5.3.3.4 Ransomware: a mobile kidnapping -- 5.3.3.5 Mobile botnets -- 5.4 Defense Mechanisms for Securing Mobile Platforms -- 5.4.1 Keychain Authentication and Encryption -- 5.4.2 Binary Protection and Hardening -- 5.4.3 Third-Party OS Products -- 5.4.4 Obfuscators and Optimizers -- 5.4.5 Compiler and Linker Defense Mechanisms -- 5.4.6 Certificate-based Mobile Authentication -- 5.4.7 Token-based Mobile Authentication -- 5.4.8 Summary -- 5.5 Related Work
5.6 Threats Analysis and Future Trends -- 5.7 Conclusion -- References -- PART III - Cryptographic Algorithms -- Chapter 6 - Quasigroup-Based Encryption for Low-Powered Devices -- Abstract -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Background-Low Energy Cryptosystems -- 6.3 Overview of Quasigroup Encryption -- 6.4 The Preliminary Block Cipher Design -- 6.5 Overview of Software Implementation -- 6.6 Overview of Three FPGA Implementations -- 6.6.1 The Quasigroup Implementation -- 6.6.2 Comparison Design-Parallel AES -- 6.6.3 Hybrid Front-End/AES Design -- 6.7 Experimental Results -- 6.8 Toward a Single-Chip Implementation -- 6.9 Algorithm Results for B = 2 to 8 -- 6.10 Generating Quasigroups Fast -- 6.11 Our Quasigroup Block Cipher Algorithm -- 6.12 Cryptanalysis and Improvements in the Block Cipher -- 6.13 Overview of a General Linear Cryptanalytical Attack -- 6.14 The LAT Design -- 6.15 Pilingup Attempts for N = 16, 32, and 64 -- 6.16 Analysis of the Attack on the Quasigroup -- 6.17 The Issue of a Total Linear Bias of 1/2 -- 6.18 Attack Complexity -- 6.19 Possible Changes that Could Be Made in the Design of This Attack Model -- 6.20 Which Quasigroup Order Is Best? -- 6.21 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 7 - Measuring Interpretation and Evaluationof Client-side Encryption Tools in Cloud Computing -- Abstract -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Cloud Service Providers (CSPs) -- 7.3 Deployment Model of Cloud Service Provider -- 7.4 Methodology -- 7.5 Deriving the Attributes of Existing Tools -- 7.5.1 AxCrypt -- 7.5.2 nCrypted Cloud -- 7.5.3 SafeBox -- 7.5.4 SpiderOak -- 7.5.5 Viivo -- 7.6 Comparison of the Studied Tools -- 7.7 Characteristics of the Studied Tools -- 7.8 Security of Encryption and Key Generation Mechanisms of the Studied Tools -- 7.9 Performance Measurement and Analysis -- 7.9.1 System Setup -- 7.9.1.1 Application tools -- 7.9.1.2 Cloud service provider
7.9.1.3 Testing environment -- 7.9.2 Analysis -- 7.10 Results and Discussion -- 7.11 Conclusion and Future Work -- References -- Chapter 8 - Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test-based Side-channel Distinguishers: Constructions, Analysis, and Implementations -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Preliminaries -- 8.2.1 Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test -- 8.2.2 KSA Distinguisher -- 8.2.3 PKS Distinguisher -- 8.3 Systematic Construction of KS Test-based Side-channel Distinguishers -- 8.3.1 Construction Strategies of KSA and PKS -- 8.3.2 Nine Variants of KS Test-based Distinguishers -- 8.4 An Experiment Analysis of All Twelve KS Test-based Side-channel Distinguishers -- 8.5 Implementation Methods of MPC-KSA [13] -- 8.5.1 Analysis of the Naive Method -- 8.5.2 Optimized Method I -- 8.5.3 Optimized Method II -- 8.6 Implementation Results -- 8.7 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- Chapter 9 - Multi-antenna Transmission Technique with Constellation Shaping for Secrecy at Physical Layer -- Abstract -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Transmitter Structure -- 9.3 Transmitter Configuration Possibilities and Security -- 9.4 Receivers and the Impact of Information Directivity -- 9.4.1 Simulation Results -- 9.4.2 Transmitter Configuration Effects in MI and Secrecy -- 9.5 Conclusions -- Acknowledgments -- References -- PART VI - Reliable System Design -- Chapter 10 -Active Sub-Areas-Based Multi-Copy Routing in VDTNs -- Abstract -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 RelatedWork -- 10.3 Identification of Each Vehicle's Active Sub-areas -- 10.4 Trace Measurement -- 10.4.1 Vehicle Mobility Pattern -- 10.4.2 Relationship between Contact and Location -- 10.5 Active Area-based Routing Method -- 10.5.1 Traffic-Considered Shortest Path Spreading -- 10.5.1.1 Road traffic measurement -- 10.5.1.2 Building traffic-considered shortest path tree -- 10.5.2 Contact-based Scanning in Each Active Sub-area
10.5.2.1 Maintaining scanning history table
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Sha, Kewei Security, Privacy and Reliability in Computer Communications and Networks Aalborg : River Publishers,c2017 9788793379893
Subject Routing protocols (Computer network protocols)
Electronic books
Alt Author Striegel, Aaron
Song, Min
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