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020    9788793609174|q(electronic bk.) 
020    |z9788793609181 
035    (MiAaPQ)EBC5180863 
035    (Au-PeEL)EBL5180863 
035    (CaPaEBR)ebr11480061 
035    (OCoLC)1015876562 
040    MiAaPQ|beng|erda|epn|cMiAaPQ|dMiAaPQ 
050  4 LB2386 .K863 2017 
082 0  378.24 
100 1  Kumar, Dinesh 
245 10 Research Methods for Successful PhD 
264  1 Aalborg :|bRiver Publishers,|c2017 
264  4 |c©2017 
300    1 online resource (194 pages) 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    computer|bc|2rdamedia 
338    online resource|bcr|2rdacarrier 
490 1  River Publishers Series in Innovation and Change in 
       Education Ser 
505 0  Front Cover -- Half Title Page -- RIVER PUBLISHERS SERIES 
       IN INNOVATION AND CHANGE IN EDUCATION - CROSS-CULTURAL 
       PERSPECTIVE -- Title Page - Research Methods for 
       Successful PhD -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- Preface --
       Acknowledgement -- Chapter 1 - What Is Research? -- 1.1 
       Introduction -- 1.2 Research and Development: What Is the 
       Difference? -- 1.3 Research, Development and PhD Students 
       -- Tasks -- Chapter 2 - Why Are We Researchers? -- 
       Abstract -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 What Is the Aim of 
       PhD? -- 2.3 University and Their PhD Students -- 2.4 
       Causes of Stress for the Candidates -- 2.5 Shortcomings of
       Output Focused PhD -- 2.6 Managing the Short-Term Demands 
       -- Tasks -- Chapter 3 - Attributes of a Researcher -- 3.1 
       Introduction -- 3.2 Knowledge and Creativity -- 3.2.1 
       Researcher Attribute - Knowledge -- 3.2.1.1 Ideas vs. 
       literature review -- 3.2.1.2 Literature review: Attention 
       to detail -- 3.2.2 Researcher Attributes: Creativity -- 
       3.2.2.1 Fostering creativity -- 3.3 Research Attributes: 
       Resilient and Self-Confident -- 3.3.1 Supporting to 
       Develop Self-Confidence -- 3.4 Research Attributes: 
       Planning and Discipline -- 3.4.1 Time Management -- 3.5 
       Researcher Attribute: Flexibility -- 3.6 Researcher 
       Attributes: Communication -- 3.6.1 What Is Communication? 
       -- 3.6.2 Clarity of the Message -- 3.6.3 Ability to Listen
       -- 3.7 Research Attributes: Partnership and Networking -- 
       3.7.1 Networking with Other Researchers -- 3.7.2 
       Partnership with Industry and External Agencies -- Tasks -
       - Chapter 4 - The Supervisor and the Supervised -- 4.1 
       Introduction -- 4.2 Student and Supervisor -- 4.2.1 
       Supervisor and the Student -- Reality Check -- 4.2.2 An 
       Ideal Supervisor -- 4.2.3 An Ideal Student -- 4.2.4 The 
       Real Situation -- 4.2.5 The Real Supervisor -- 4.2.5.1 The
       supervisor does not appear to have the time for the 
       student or the project 
505 8  4.2.5.1.1 Suggestions to the student -- 4.2.5.2 The 
       supervisor appears to be unreasonable in the expectations 
       of the student -- 4.2.5.3 Supervisor does not appear to 
       have the knowledge of the topic -- 4.2.5.4 Supervisor does
       not appear to be interested in the student, the topic or 
       the outcomes -- 4.2.5.5 Supervisor makes personal remarks 
       or invitations -- 4.2.5.6 Romantic liaison -- 4.2.5.7 
       Supervisor personality type -- Lacks emotions or is too 
       emotional -- 4.2.5.8 Personality clash -- 4.2.6 Real 
       Research Student -- 4.2.6.1 Transition from undergraduate 
       to post-graduate -- 4.2.6.1.1 Change of expectations -- 
       4.3 Selection of the Supervisor and Student -- 4.3.1 
       Background of Student -- 4.4 Networking -- 4.4.1 
       Networking with Other Professors -- 4.4.2 Industry 
       Partnership: Support for Students -- 4.5 Dispute 
       Management and Resolution -- 4.5.1 Causes of Disputes -- 
       4.5.1.1 Expectations -- 4.5.1.2 Challenge to research 
       outcomes -- 4.5.1.3 Personal beliefs and desires -- 4.5.2 
       Resolving and Managing Disputes -- 4.6 Communication - 
       Supervisor and the Supervised -- 4.7 Being Mindful with 
       Supervisor -- Tasks -- Chapter 5 - Responsibilities of a 
       Researcher -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Accountability -- 
       5.2.1 What Is the Need? -- 5.2.2 Comparison between 
       Researchers -- 5.2.3 Challenges in Measuring Research 
       Outcomes -- 5.3 Measuring Research Outcome -- 5.3.1 Some 
       Measures of Research Impact -- 5.4 Need for Peer Review --
       5.5 Publications for Spread and Growth of Knowledge -- 
       5.5.1 Review Process: Spread of Knowledge -- 5.6 Review 
       Process -- 5.6.1 Managing the Review Process -- 5.7 
       Summary of Responsibilities of Researchers -- Tasks -- 
       Chapter 6 - Continuing to Be a Researcher: Motivation 
       Issues for Researchers -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Mid-
       Candidature Blues -- 6.3 Why Do We Get the Blues? -- 6.4 
       Motivating a Researcher - Suggestions for the Supervisor 
505 8  6.4.1 Corporate Style Carrot and Stick Approach -- 6.4.2 
       Accolades and Shaming -- 6.4.3 Finding Motivation is 
       Personal -- 6.5 How to Motivate Yourself? -- 6.5.1 
       Identifying the Different States -- 6.5.2 Lazy and 
       Confused State: What Happens? -- 6.5.2.1 Lazy and confused
       state: What to do? -- 6.5.3 In the Active State -- 6.5.4 
       The Creative State -- 6.5.4.1 Stating the vision -- 
       6.5.4.2 Planning for the vision -- 6.5.4.3 Short term 
       goals -- 6.6 How to Become Productive? -- Tasks -- Chapter
       7 - Research Proposal -- Task Before You Start This 
       Chapter -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.1.1 Dynamic Idleness -- 
       7.1.2 Mid-Candidature Blues -- 7.2 Purpose of Research 
       Proposals -- 7.3 What Is a Research Proposal? -- 7.4 
       Developing the Research Proposal -- 7.4.1 Title -- 7.4.2 
       Aim -- 7.4.3 Objective -- 7.4.4 Scope -- 7.4.4.1 Example 
       to explain scope -- 7.4.5 Research Questions -- 7.4.5.1 
       Example of research proposal -- 7.4.6 Developing the 
       Hypothesis -- 7.4.6.1 Example for developing the 
       hypothesis -- 7.4.7 Developing the Methodology -- 7.4.8 
       Time Frame -- 7.4.8.1 Project timeline -- 7.4.8.2 
       Regularity in timeline -- 7.4.8.3 Changes to the timeline 
       -- 7.4.9 Milestones -- Tasks -- Chapter 8 - Planning the 
       Experiments -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Focus and Scope -- 
       8.3 Inferential Statistics -- 8.4 Descriptive Statistics -
       - 8.4.1 Central Tendency -- 8.4.2 Dispersion -- 8.5 
       Significance -- 8.6 Statistical Hypothesis -- 8.7 
       Measuring Significance -- 8.7.1 p Value to Test Null 
       Hypothesis -- 8.7.2 What Is Significance Level? -- 8.8 
       Reproducibility -- 8.9 Types of Statistical Tests -- 8.9.1
       Parametric Tests -- 8.9.2 Non-Parametric Tests -- 8.10 
       Confidence Band, Confidence Intervals and Confidence 
       Levels -- 8.11 Statistical Tests -- 8.11.1 Correlation -- 
       8.11.2 Regression -- 8.11.3 t-test -- 8.11.3.1 Unpaired t-
       test -- 8.11.3.2 Paired t-test -- 8.11.4 Analysis of 
       Variance (ANOVA) 
505 8  8.12 System Performance Measure -- 8.12.1 Accuracy, 
       Sensitivity and Specificity -- 8.12.2 Confusion Matrix -- 
       8.12.3 Statistical Power -- 8.12.4 Receiver Operator 
       Characteristic (ROC) Curve -- Tasks -- Chapter 9 - 
       Communication Skills -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Need to 
       Communicate for Researchers -- 9.3 Essentials for 
       Effective Communication -- 9.4 Developing Oral 
       Communication -- 9.4.1 Planned and Focused -- 9.4.2 
       Connect with Audience -- 9.5 Presenting to Your 
       Supervisors -- 9.6 Conference Seminar -- 9.6.1 Example for
       Audience Focus -- 9.7 Listening and Observing -- 9.8 
       Planning the Presentation -- 9.8.1 How to Start: A Brief 
       to Put in Context -- 9.8.1.1 Example -- 9.8.1.2 Example --
       9.8.2 Content -- 9.8.3 Conclusion -- 9.8.3.1 Facts and 
       opinion -- 9.9 Style of Communication -- 9.9.1 Aggressive 
       Communication -- 9.9.2 Passive Communication -- 9.9.3 
       Assertive Communication -- 9.9.4 Examples: Aggressive and 
       Assertive Communication -- 9.10 Written Communication -- 
       9.10.1 Informal Written Communication -- 9.10.1.1 Writing 
       emails -- 9.11 Formal Written Communication -- 9.11.1 
       Structure -- 9.11.2 Style -- 9.11.2.1 Compact -- 9.11.2.2 
       Formal -- 9.11.2.3 Simple statements -- 9.11.3 Content -- 
       9.12 Some Points for Effective Written Communication -- 
       Tasks -- Chapter 10 - Why Publish? -- 10.1 Introduction --
       10.2 Peer Review of Research -- 10.3 Publications for 
       Accountability -- 10.4 Manuscript Submissions as 
       Milestones -- 10.5 Publications for Employability -- 10.6 
       How to Stand Out of the Crowd? -- 10.7 Benefit to the 
       Society -- 10.8 Measure of Outcomes -- 10.9 Getting the 
       Balance -- Tasks -- Chapter 11 - How to Publish: Writing 
       Manuscripts -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Target Audience -
       - 11.3 When to Start the Manuscript? -- 11.4 Develop a 
       Plan -- 11.5 Typical Subheadings of a Paper in Science, 
       Engineering and Health -- 11.6 Starting the Manuscript 
505 8  11.7 The Title -- 11.8 Abstract -- 11.9 Writing the 
       Introduction -- 11.9.1 Introduction - Some Common Mistakes
       -- 11.10 Theory -- 11.11 Methodology -- 11.12 Data 
       Analysis -- 11.13 Discussion -- 11.14 Conclusion -- 11.15 
       Paper Iterations -- 11.16 List of Authors -- 11.17 What 
       Gets Published? -- 11.18 What Gets Rejected? -- 11.19 Post
       -Submission of Manuscript -- 11.20 Difference between 
       Thesis and Manuscript -- 11.21 Review Process -- 11.22 
       Managing the Review Process -- Tasks -- Appendix -- Index 
       -- About the Author -- Back Cover 
520    Research Methods for Successful PhDis a candid 
       conversation developed from theexperience of supervising 
       30 research students and publishing 400 papers over20 
       years. The book recognizes that every student is different
       and has uniquecircumstances. It teases out the fundamental
       questions that we forget to ask,the method of relating to 
       the supervisor, discusses methods to improvecommunication 
       skills and explains how to get the work published 
588    Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other
       sources 
590    Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest 
       Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access 
       may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated 
       libraries 
650  0 Doctor of philosophy degree. 
650  0 Universities and colleges-Graduate work 
655  4 Electronic books 
776 08 |iPrint version:|aKumar, Dinesh|tResearch Methods for 
       Successful PhD|dAalborg : River Publishers,c2017
       |z9788793609181 
830  0 River Publishers Series in Innovation and Change in 
       Education Ser 
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