Record:   Prev Next
Author Panther, Klaus-Uwe
Title Metonymy and Pragmatic Inferencing
Imprint Philadelphia : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2003
©2003
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (297 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Metonymy and Pragmatic Inferencing -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC page -- Dedication page -- Table of contents -- List of contributors -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1. Background and purpose of the volume -- 2. Some properties of conceptual metonymy -- 2.1. Metonymy as a contingent relation -- 2.2. Metonymy and speech acts -- 2.3. Do referential, predicational, and illocutionary metonymies form a ̀̀natural class''? -- 2.4. Strength of metonymic link -- 2.5. The ubiquity of metonymy -- 2.6. Summary -- 3. Metonymy and pragmatic inferencing -- 3.1. Metonymy and implicature -- 3.2. Metonymy and explicature -- 4. The contributions to this volume -- 4.1. The place of metonymy in cognition and pragmatics -- 4.2. Metonymic inferencing and grammatical structure -- 4.3. Metonymic inferencing and linguistic change -- 4.4. Metonymic inferencing across languages -- 5. Prospects for studies in metonymy -- Notes -- References -- Part 1. The place of metonymy in cognition and pragmatics -- Cognitive operations and pragmatic implication -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Implicatures and explicatures -- 3. Metaphoric mappings and pragmatic implication -- 4. Metonymic mappings and pragmatic implication -- 5. Explicature derivation through double metonymic mapping -- 6. Conceptual interaction between metaphor and metonymy as a form of deriving explicatures -- 7. Summary and conclusion -- Notes -- References -- Metonymy and conceptual blending -- 1. Introduction -- 2. General definitions of conceptual blending -- 2.1. Mental space theory -- 2.2. Conceptual blending theory -- 2.3. Conceptual integration networks -- 3. Optimality principles -- 4. Metonymic shifts -- 5. Idioms: X your own Y -- 5.1. Digging your own grave -- 5.2. Blowing your own horn -- 6. Sculpture -- 7. Conclusion -- References -- The case for a metonymic basis of pragmatic inferencing
1. Introduction -- 2. Metonymy -- 3. Analysis of a sample of jokes and anecdotes -- 3.1. The pediatrician and the innocent young mother -- 3.2. The ironic doctor -- 3.3. Clubs and kindness -- 3.4. A parliamentary repartee -- 4. Conclusions -- Notes -- References -- Part 2. Metonymic inferencing and grammatical structure -- A construction-based approach to indirect speech acts -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Some basic tenets of Construction Grammar -- 3. Indirect speech act constructions -- 3.1. Unpredictable semantic properties of indirect speech acts -- 3.2. Unpredictable formal properties of indirect speech acts -- 3.3. The metonymy link -- 4. Neurolinguistic evidence -- 5. Discussion and conclusions -- Notes -- References -- Metonymies as natural inference and activation schemas -- 1. Introduction -- 2. A cognitive approach to independent if-clauses -- 2.1. The conceptual space of the independent if-clause -- 2.2. A scenario approach to speech acts -- 3. Analysis of data -- 3.1. Deontic function -- 3.2. Expressive function -- 3.3. Epistemic function -- 4. Summary and conclusions -- Notes -- References -- Metonymic pathways to neuter-gender human nominals in German -- 1. Introduction: remarkable syntax in a text by Karl Waggerl -- 2. The semantics of nominal classification in German -- 2.1. Some principles of gender assignment in the German lexicon -- 2.2. Empirical support for non-arbitrary gender assignment in German -- 3. German neut-gender classification for human beings -- 3.1. Historical development and current productivity -- 3.2. Metonymic motivation of German neut-gender nouns -- 4. Metonymic processes in discourse: the Waggerl text -- 5. Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- Appendix -- Part 3. Metonymic inferencing and linguistic change -- The development of counterfactual implicatures in English -- 1. Introduction
2. M-inferences and counterfactual implicatures -- 2.1. M-inferences and Quantity -- 2.2. Other possible candidates for M-inferences -- 2.3. Modality and Horn-scales -- 2.4. The contribution of metonymic extensions -- 3. Aspect and grammatical environment -- 4. Interim summary -- 5. A survey of diachronic texts -- 5.1. Data and environments -- 5.2. Results and discussion -- 6. Comparison of the three alternates -- 7. Conclusions -- Notes -- References -- Primary sources -- Old English -- Middle English -- Early Modern English -- Metonymy and pragmatic inference in the functional reanalysis of grammatical morphemes in Japanese -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Morphemes used as comps and as sfps -- 3. Koto as an sfp in the [S koto] construction -- 4. Pragmatic inference in the reanalysis of koto -- 5. The role of metonymy in the reanalysis of grammatical morphemes -- Notes -- References -- Part 4. Metonymic inferencing across languages -- Metonymic construals of shopping requests in have- and be-languages -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Metonymic construal of shopping requests in have- and be-languages -- 2.1. Precondition: the article's availability -- 2.2. Transfer of the article to the customer -- 2.3. Reception of the article by the customer -- 2.4. Result of the article's transaction -- 2.5. Summary -- 3. Discussion -- 3.1. Possession vs. existence -- 3.2. Indirectness vs. Deference -- 3.3. Action vs. process -- 4. Conclusions -- Notes -- References -- Metonymic coding of linguistic action in English, Croatian and Hungarian -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Reporting linguistic action and metonymy -- 3. A preliminary crosslinguistic comparison -- 4. Referential vs. predicational metonymy, polysemy of adjectives and the role of grammatical constructions in English -- 5. More contrastive data on ascriptive constructions and polysemy in predication formation
6. Conclusions -- Note -- References -- Name index -- Metonymy and metaphor index -- Subject index -- The PRAGMATICS AND BEYOND NEW SERIES
In recent years, conceptual metonymy has been recognized as a cognitive phenomenon that is as fundamental as metaphor for reasoning and the construction of meaning. The thoroughly revised chapters in the present volume originated as presentations in a workshop organized by the editors for the 7th International Pragmatics Conference held in Budapest in 2000. They constitute, according to an anonymous reviewer, "an interesting contribution to both cognitive linguistics and pragmatics." The contributions aim to bridge the gap, and encourage discussion, between cognitive linguists and scholars working in a pragmatic framework. Topics include the metonymic basis of explicature and implicature, the role of metonymically-based inferences in speech act and discourse interpretation, the pragmatic meaning of grammatical constructions, the impact of metonymic mappings on and their interaction with grammatical structure, the role of metonymic inferencing and implicature in linguistic change, and the comparison of metonymic principles across languages and different cultural settings
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Panther, Klaus-Uwe Metonymy and Pragmatic Inferencing Philadelphia : John Benjamins Publishing Company,c2003 9789027253552
Subject Metonyms -- Congresses.;Pragmatics -- Congresses.;Inference -- Congresses.;Speech acts (Linguistics) -- Congresses.;Linguistic change -- Congresses
Electronic books
Alt Author Thornburg, Linda L
Record:   Prev Next