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Author Gonenc, L
Title Prospects for constitutionalism in post-communist countries
Imprint Leiden : BRILL, 2002
©2002
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (454 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Intro -- Contents -- List of Tables -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- Chapter 1. Conceptual Framework -- 1.1. Introduction -- A Legal Approach to Constitutions -- A Political Approach to Constitutions -- Comparative or Case Studies -- 1.2. Basic Definitions -- Political System, Regime, Constitution -- 1.3. Constitutional Stability and Change -- 1.4. Conclusions -- Chapter 2. Political Culture -- 2.1. Introduction -- The Concept of Culture -- Criticism of the Civic-Culture Approach -- The Concept of Political Culture -- Religion and Economics as the Determinants of Political Culture -- Liberal Democratic Political Culture -- 2.2. Pre-Communist Political Culture and Constitutionalism -- Germanic and Slavic Tribal Kingdoms -- Medieval Constitutionalism in Europe -- Comparing European Medieval Constitutionalism with Constitutionalism in Russia and the Balkans -- 2.2.1. First Stage of the First Great Transformation of European Political Culture -- 2.2.2. Second Stage of the First Great Transformation of European Political Culture -- 2.2.3. The Age of Nationalism -- 2.2.4. The Impact of Liberal Constitutionalism in Russia -- 2.2.5. The Second Great Transformation of European Political Culture -- 2.2.6. Liberal Democratic Constitutionalism in the Inter-War Years -- 2.2.7. Conclusions -- 2.3. Communist Political Culture and Constitutionalism -- Communist Rejection of the Principle of Separation of Powers -- Communist Rejection of the Principle of the Rule of Law -- 2.4. Post-Communist Political Culture and Constitutionalism -- Popular Support for Democratic Norms and Principles and Conditions of Constitutional Changes within Regimes -- Post-Communist Political Culture and Post-Communist Constitutions -- 2.5. Conclusions -- Chapter 3. Constitution-Making -- 3.1. Introduction -- Constitution-Making -- 3.2. Transition to Democracy
Revolution or Transition to Democracy -- Modes of Transition -- 3.3. Constitution-Making -- Elite Characteristics of Constitution-Making -- Constituent or National Assemblies -- Election of Constitution-Makers -- Constitution-Making Style -- Ratification of Constitutions -- Timing of Constitution-Making -- 3.4. Transition to Democracy and Constitution-Making in Eastern Europe -- 3.4.1. Poland -- 3.4.2. Hungary -- 3.4.3. Czechoslovakia -- 3.4.4. Bulgaria -- 3.4.5. Romania -- 3.4.6. Albania -- 3.5. Conclusions -- 3.6. Transition to Democracy and Constitution-Making in the Former USSR -- 3.6.1. USSR -- 3.6.2. The Russian Federation -- 3.6.3. Baltic Republics -- 3.6.4. Ukraine -- 3.6.5. Transcaucasia -- 3.6.6. Moldova -- 3.6.7. Belarus -- 3.6.8. Central Asia -- 3.7. Conclusions -- Chapter 4. Effectiveness -- 4.1. Introduction -- 4.2. Definition of Effectiveness -- Functions of Constitutions -- 4.3. Rights and Liberties in Post-Communist Constitutions -- Rights, Human Rights, Legal Rights and Constitutional Rights -- Liberal and Socialist Conceptions of Human Rights -- 4.3.1. Civil Liberties -- 4.3.2. Political Rights -- 4.3.3. Conclusions -- 4.3.4. Social and Economic Rights -- 4.3.5. Protection of Rights and Liberties at the National Level -- 4.3.6. The Gap Between the Constitution on Paper and Reality -- 4.3.7. International Mechanisms to Protect Individual Liberties -- 4.3.8. Constitutional Conditions of Effective Demo-Protection -- 4.4. Executive-Legislative Relations in Post-Communist Constitutions -- From Communist Constitutional Systems to Post-Communist Constitutional Systems -- Defining the Types of Liberal Democratic Constitutional Systems -- Defining Constitutional Powers of Presidents -- 4.4.1. Post-Communist Pure Presidential Systems: Azerbaijan, Georgia, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan
4.4.2. Post-Communist President-Parliamentary Systems: Armenia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Turkmenistan and Ukraine -- 4.4.3. Assessing the Presidential System -- 4.4.4. Post-Communist Premier-Presidential (Semi-Presidential) Systems: Poland, Romania, Lithuania and Moldova -- 4.4.5. Assessing the Semi-Presidential System -- 4.4.6. Post-Communist Parliamentary Systems: Albania, Czech Republic, Estonia, Latvia and Hungary -- 4.4.7. Post-Communist Parliamentary "with" President Systems: Bulgaria and Slovakia -- 4.4.8. Assessing the Parliamentary System -- 4.4.9. Republic or Monarchy -- 4.4.10. Constitutional Conditions of Effective Demo-Power -- 4.5. Legislature -- 4.6. The Referendum -- 4.7. Functions of Constitutions in Multi-National Political Systems -- Legal Solutions to Ethno-National Problems -- Political Solutions to Ethno-National Problems -- Federalism in Russia -- 4.8. Conclusions -- Chapter 5. Constitutional Change and Consolidation of Democracy -- 5.1. Causes of Constitutional Change -- Forms of Constitutional Change -- Processes of Constitutional Change -- Actors of Constitutional Change -- 5.2. Constitutional Change and Consolidation of Democracy -- Defining Consolidation of Democracy -- Conclusions -- Bibliography -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- Y -- Z -- About the Author
The main questions dealt with throughout this study can be formulated as follows: Will liberal democratic constitutionalism take root in post-communist countries? And will new constitutions in Eastern Europe and the former USSR perish or survive?
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Gonenc, L. Prospects for constitutionalism in post-communist countries Leiden : BRILL,c2002 9789041118363
Subject Constitutional law -- Europe, Eastern.;Post-communism -- Former Soviet republics.;Democracy
Electronic books
Alt Author Gnen?, Levent
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