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Author Fry, Elinor
Title The Contours of International Prosecutions : As Defined by Facts, Charges, and Jurisdiction
Imprint Portland : Eleven International Publishing, 2015
©2016
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (229 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Note Cover -- Title page -- Acknowledgments -- Table of Contents -- Table of Cases -- Table of Instruments -- Abbreviations -- Frequently Abbreviated Sources -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 In Search of Common Ground -- 1.2 Questions of Demarcation in International Criminal Law -- 1.3 Methodology and Scope -- 1.4 Roadmap -- Part I The Nature of the Crime -- 2 The Nature of International Crimes and Evidentiary Challenges -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 The Nature of International Crimes: Differentiating Factors -- 2.2.1 Goals of international criminal justice -- 2.2.1.1 Fighting impunity -- 2.2.1.2 Restoring international peace and security -- 2.2.1.3 Preserving the historical record for didactic purposes -- 2.2.2 What to prove -- 2.2.2.1 Crimes of context -- 2.2.2.2 Modes of liability -- 2.2.3 How to prove -- 2.3 Quantity Affects Quality -- 2.3.1 On scope and quantity -- 2.3.2 Enhancing judicial economy -- 2.4 Conclusion -- Part II Factual Demarcation at Case Level -- 3 International Crimes and Case Demarcation -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Indictments -- 3.2.1 IMT, IMTFE and Control Council Law No. 10 -- 3.2.2 The contemporary ad hoc and hybrid institutions -- 3.2.3 Bringing charges at the ICC -- 3.3 Case Demarcation: What Is Material? -- 3.3.1 Subsidiary facts and background information -- 3.3.2 Between proof and pleading: patterns of conduct and similar fact evidence -- 3.4 The Specificity of Charges and the Right to Be Put on Notice -- 3.4.1 Notice: preparing a defense -- 3.4.2 Ne bis in idem -- 3.5 Conclusion -- 4 Legal Recharacterization and the Materiality of Facts at the ICC -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Back to Basics: Charges, Facts, and Evidence -- 4.2.1 What is a charge? -- 4.2.2 Facts and circumstances: what is material? -- 4.3 Deciding on Charges: the Role of Regulation 55 -- 4.3.1 Adoption: taking issue -- 4.3.1.1 'Routine functioning'
4.3.1.2 The iura novit curia principle -- 4.3.1.3 Recharacterizing or amending: whose power is it? -- 4.3.1.4 Purpose (fulfilled?) -- 4.3.2 Application: modifications and notifications in ICC cases to date -- 4.3.2.1 Lubanga: the Court's first litigation on Regulation 55 -- 4.3.2.2 Bemba: should have known -- 4.3.2.3 Katanga: changing the narrative -- 4.3.2.4 Ruto, Banda, and Ntaganda: alternative charging in disguise? -- 4.4 Which Recharacterizations Are Permissible? -- 4.4.1 Recharacterizing the crime -- 4.4.2 Recharacterizing the mode of liability: less is worse -- 4.4.3 Filling gaps: a slippery slope -- 4.5 Conclusion -- Part III Jurisdictional Reachof the International Criminal Court -- 5 Between Show Trials and Sham Prosecutions -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Complementarity and Principles of Due Process -- 5.2.1 The due process thesis: the treaty and critiques -- 5.2.2 Introducing a moderate form of the due process thesis -- 5.2.2.1 Article 17's due process clause -- 5.2.2.2 Due process rights: objective and scope -- 5.2.2.3 A process-oriented approach -- 5.2.2.4 Article 20's due process clause -- 5.2.2.5 The moderate due process thesis: which rights? -- 5.2.2.6 Practice: moving towards the moderate due process thesis -- 5.3 The Moderate Due Process Thesis in Context: Evidentiary Rules -- 5.3.1 Evidentiary rules as due process protections -- 5.3.2 Correction factor: international crimes and fact-finding -- 5.4 Conclusion -- 6 On the Verge of Engagement -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 The Difference between Triggering Jurisdiction and the Preconditions for Exercising Jurisdiction -- 6.3 The ICC's Jurisdiction Preconditions and Situational Demarcation -- 6.3.1 The active nationality principle and the ICC's problematic jurisdictionover foreign Islamic State fighters -- 6.3.2 Article 12(3) declarations and temporal jurisdiction: the situation inPalestine
6.4 Conclusion -- 7 Overall Conclusion and Outlook -- Appendix 1 Evidence, Facts, and Charges -- Appendix 2 The 10 Pleading Principles -- Bibliography
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Fry, Elinor The Contours of International Prosecutions : As Defined by Facts, Charges, and Jurisdiction Portland : Eleven International Publishing,c2015 9789462366213
Subject International criminal courts
Electronic books
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