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Author Wallace, Sarah Isabel, author
Title Not fit to stay : public health panics and South Asian exclusion / Sarah Isabel Wallace
Imprint Vancouver ; Toronto : UBC Press, [2017]
©2017
book jacket
LOCATION CALL # STATUS OPACMSG BARCODE
 人文社會聯圖  RA446.5.P165 W34 2017    AVAILABLE    30610020531844
 Modern History Library  362.10979 W194    AVAILABLE    30550100625191
Descript ix, 279 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
text txt rdacontent
unmediated n rdamedia
volume nc rdacarrier
Note Includes bibliographical references (pages 199-253) and index
Introduction -- 1. "Leprosy and plague riot in their blood" : the germination of a thesis, 1906 -- 2. Riots, plague, and the advent of executive exclusion -- 3. "The public health must prevail" : enforcing exclusion -- 4. Amoebic and social parasites, 1910-13 -- 5. South Asians, public health, and eugenic theory -- 6. Franchise denied -- Conclusion
"Not Fit to Stay: Public Health Panics and South Asian Exclusion examines how and why South Asians were prevented from immigrating to British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, and California between 1900 and 1920. In the first decades of the twentieth century, all Asian immigrants to Canada and the United States faced opposition to their arrival and settlement. While racism and fear of labour competition were at the heart of this resistance, panic soon swept up and down the West Coast of North America over unsubstantiated public health concerns. Public leaders--including physicians, union leaders, civil servants, journalists, and politicians--latched on to these health concerns as the basis for the exclusion of the South Asians, who were said to suffer from medical conditions and diseases attributed to their race. Even though many officials knew the public health argument had no grounds, they promoted it to support their racist views and concerns about labour. Legislation to restrict the immigration of South Asians took effect in Canada in 1908 and in the United States in 1917. This book is an important study of how white North Americans saw first-wave South Asian immigrants as separate from, and inferior to, other groups in the evolving racial hierarchy on the West Coast of North America."-- Provided by publisher
Issued also in electronic format
Subject South Asians -- Health and hygiene -- Pacific Coast (North America) -- History -- 20th century
Immigrants -- Health and hygiene -- Pacific Coast (North America) -- History -- 20th century
Public health -- Political aspects -- Pacific Coast (North America) -- History -- 20th century
Public health -- Social aspects -- Pacific Coast (North America) -- History -- 20th century
Racism -- Pacific Coast (North America) -- History -- 20th century
Marginality, Social -- Pacific Coast (North America) -- History -- 20th century
Pacific Coast (North America) -- Ethnic relations -- History -- 20th century
Pacific Coast (North America) -- Emigration and immigration -- History -- 20th century
Public Health -- history
North America
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