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Author Loewer, Barry
Title A Companion to David Lewis
Imprint Somerset : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2015
©2015
book jacket
Edition 1st ed
Descript 1 online resource (595 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series Blackwell Companions to Philosophy Ser
Blackwell Companions to Philosophy Ser
Note Cover -- Blackwell Companions to Philosophy -- Title page -- Copyright page -- Contents -- Notes on Contributors -- Part I: Biography and New Work -- 1: Intellectual Biography of David Lewis (1941-2001): Early Influences -- 1.1 Childhood -- 1.2 Swarthmore: The First Two Years -- 1.3 Oxford -- 1.4 Swarthmore: Second Two Years -- 1.5 The Hudson Institute -- 1.6 Graduate School: Australia I, Jack Smart -- 1.7 UCLA -- 1.8 Australia II: David Armstrong -- 1.9 Australia III: The First Visit -- 1.10 Princeton -- 1.11 Australia IV: 1976 -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- References -- 2: Counterparts of States of Affairs -- Acknowledgments -- Note -- References -- 3: Reply to Dana Scott, "Is There Life on Possible Worlds?" -- Note -- Part II: Methodology and Context -- 4: Lewis's Philosophical Method -- 4.1 Starting Points: Science and Common Sense -- 4.2 After the Starting Points: Defining Theoretical Roles, Finding Deservers -- 4.3 Counting the Costs -- 4.4 Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- 5: On Metaphysical Analysis -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Some Background on Holes -- 5.2.1 The Next Move -- 5.3 The Nature of Space -- 5.4 Space, Worlds, and Holes -- 5.4.1 Relationism and Holes -- 5.4.2 Substantivalism and Holes -- 5.5 Metaphysics and Analysis -- 5.6 Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- 6: A Lewisian History of Philosophy -- 6.1 Properties -- 6.2 Carving at the Joints -- 6.3 Persistence -- 6.4 Causality -- 6.5 Modality -- 6.6 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- References -- 7: David Lewis's Place in Analytic Philosophy -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- References -- Part III: Metaphysics and Science -- 8: Humean Supervenience -- 8.1 What Is Humean Supervenience? -- 8.2 Supervenience -- 8.3 What Is Perfect Naturalness? -- 8.4 Humean Supervenience and Other Humean Theses -- 8.5 Why Care about Humean Supervenience -- 8.6 Points, Vectors, and Lewis
References -- 9: No Work for a Theory of Universals -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Best System Accounts of Laws -- 9.2.1 Answers to the Language Question -- 9.2.2 Answers to the Metrics Question -- 9.2.3 The Landscape -- 9.3 Assessing the Options -- 9.3.1 Language-Objectivity and Metrics-Objectivity -- 9.3.2 Language-Indexicality and Metrics-Indexicality -- 9.3.3 Language-Rigidity and Metrics-Rigidity -- 9.3.4 Language-Relativity and Metrics-Relativity -- 9.3.5 Language-Salience -- 9.3.6 Taking Stock -- 9.4 Extending the Account -- 9.4.1 Three Worries -- 9.5 Another Approach -- 9.6 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- References -- 10: Hume's Dictum and Metaphysical Modality: Lewis's Combinatorialism -- Introduction -- 10.1 HD and Its Recurrent Role in Lewis's Work -- 10.1.1 From Hume to HD -- 10.1.2 HD's Recurrent Role in Lewis's Work -- 10.2 HD and Lewis's Combinatorialism -- 10.2.1 HD as a Principle of Recombination -- 10.2.2 Prima Facie Advantages of Lewis's Combinatorialism -- 10.3 Undergeneration Concerns for Lewis's Combinatorialism -- 10.3.1 Spatiotemporally Overlapping Hume-Intrinsic Fundamenta -- 10.3.2 Undergenerated Macro-Possibilities -- 10.3.3 The Presupposition of Spatiotemporal Fundamentality -- 10.4 The End Game -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- References -- 11: Truthmaking: With and Without Counterpart Theory -- 11.1 The Theory of Truthmaking -- 11.2 Truthmaking and States of Affairs -- 11.3 Truthmaking and Theories of Truth -- 11.4 Lewis's Critique of (TM) and a States-of-Affairs Ontology -- 11.5 (TM) and a States-of-Affairs Ontology, Reconsidered -- 11.5.1 Truthmaking and Counterpart Theory: Lewis's Approach -- 11.5.2 Truthmaking and Counterpart Theory: An Alternative Approach32 -- 11.6 Truth Supervenes on Being -- Notes -- References -- 12: How to Be Humean -- The Doctrine and the Program
12.1 Humean Supervenience and the Failure of Content-Preserving Reduction -- 12.1.1 Best Systems -- 12.1.2 The Function of Beliefs about Law and Chance -- 12.2 A Different Conception of Humean Reduction: Identifying Truthmakers -- 12.3 Digging Deeper -- 12.3.1 The Side-On View as a Generalization of the Search for Truthmakers -- 12.3.2 The New Humean -- 12.3.3 Lewis's Transition from a Deflationary to an Inflationary Modal Ontology -- 12.3.4 Objections and Queries -- 12.4 Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- 13: Where (in Logical Space) Is God? -- 13.1 Background and Scene-Setting -- 13.2 The God of the Philosophers -- 13.3 Free Will -- 13.4 Divine Evil -- 13.5 Atonement as Penal Substitution -- 13.6 The Many-Worlds Theodicy -- Notes -- 14: De Re Modality, Essentialism, and Lewis's Humeanism -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 De Re Modality and Counterpart Theory -- 14.3 Counterpart Theory and the Inconstancy of De Re Modal Predication -- 14.4 Truthmaking and Counterpart Theory -- 14.5 Lewis versus School Metaphysics -- 14.6 Humean Supervenience and De Re Modality -- Notes -- References -- 15: David Lewis on Persistence -- 15.1 Persistence and Humean Supervenience -- 15.2 In Defense of Stages -- 15.3 Temporary Intrinsics -- 15.4 Stages, or Sums of Stages? -- Acknowledgments -- References -- 16: "Perfectly Understood, Unproblematic, and Certain": Lewis on Mereology -- 16.1 Four Theses about Composition -- 16.2 First Thesis: Uniqueness -- 16.3 Second Thesis: Unrestricted Composition -- 16.4 First Reflection: Motivating Mereological Principles -- 16.5 Second Reflection: Persistence -- 16.6 Third Thesis: Ontological Innocence -- 16.7 Fourth Thesis: Unmysteriousness -- 16.8 Fourth Reflection: Privileging Mereology -- References -- 17: Humean Reductionism about Laws of Nature -- 17.1 Introduction -- 17.2 Preliminaries -- 17.3 The Elements of Humean Reductionism
17.4 The Best System Account: An Overview -- 17.4.1 The Official Guiding Idea -- 17.4.2 The Unofficial Guiding Idea -- 17.4.3 Reconciling the Two Guiding Ideas -- 17.5 A Menu of Challenges to the BSA -- 17.5.1 The Problem of Ratbag Idealism -- 17.5.2 The Information That Counts -- 17.6 A Solution and a Problem -- 17.6.1 Solving the Problem of Too Much Information -- 17.6.2 A Dilemma for Humean Reductionism -- 17.7 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- 18: Why Lewisians Should Love Deterministic Chance -- 18.1 Chance and Determinism -- 18.2 Lewis's Theory of Chance -- 18.2.1 Indexing -- 18.2.2 Chance as a Nomological Magnitude -- 18.2.3 Chance as a Guide to Credence -- 18.2.4 Chance as a Humean Magnitude -- 18.2.5 Objective Chanciness -- 18.3 A Theory of Deterministic Chance -- 18.3.1 Indexing -- 18.3.2 Chance as a Nomological Magnitude -- 18.3.3 Chance as a Guide to Credence -- 18.3.4 Chance as a Humean Magnitude -- 18.3.5 Objective Chanciness -- 18.3.6 Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- 19: Lewis on Causation -- 19.1 Introduction -- 19.2 Preliminaries -- 19.3 Lewis's Analyses -- 19.3.1 Causation 1973 -- 19.3.2 Causation 1986 -- 19.3.3 Causation 2000 -- 19.4 Applications -- 19.4.1 Causal Decision Theory -- 19.4.2 Dispositions -- 19.5 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- References -- Part IV: Language and Logic -- 20: David Lewis on Convention -- 20.1 Coordination in the Social World -- 20.2 Convention -- 20.3 Conventions of Meaning in Critical Perspective -- 20.3.1 Improvised Meaning -- 20.3.2 Universal Grammar -- 20.3.3 Other Perspectives on Convention and Meaning -- 20.4 Conclusion -- References -- 21: Asking What a Meaning Does: David Lewis's Contributions to Semantics -- 21.1 David Lewis's Background and Early Involvement with Linguistics
21.2 Lewis's Central Methodological Advice for the Study of Meaning -- 21.3 Languages and Language -- 21.4 Possible Worlds, Counterfactuals, Modality, Counterparts -- 21.5 Important Particular Ideas -- 21.5.1 Categorial Grammar and Function-Argument Structure -- 21.5.2 Generalized Quantifiers -- 21.5.3 Adverbs of Quantification -- 21.5.4 Contexts and Indices -- 21.6 Bridging Philosophy and Linguistics -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- References -- 22: Accommodation in a Language Game -- 22.1 Introduction -- 22.2 Presupposition Recognition -- 22.3 The Character of Accommodation -- 22.4 The Role of the Scoreboard in Accommodation -- 22.5 Limits on Accommodation -- 22.6 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- References -- 23: Lewis on Reference and Eligibility -- 23.1 Lewis's Interpretationism -- 23.1.1 Interpretationism -- 23.1.2 Reference Magnetism and Naturalness -- 23.1.3 Best Grammar, Humean Simplicity, and Eligibility -- 23.1.4 Summary -- 23.2 Credible Reference Magnetism -- 23.2.1 Response 1: Macronaturalism -- 23.2.2 Response 2: Comparative Naturalism -- 23.2.3 Response 3: Parochial Eligibility -- 23.3 Buck-passing -- 23.4 Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- 24: On the Nature of Certain Philosophical Entities: Set Theoretic Constructionalism in the Metaphysics of David Lewis -- 24.1 Lewis's Ontological Scheme -- 24.2 Metaphysics of Classes: The Simple View -- 24.3 Metaphysics of Classes: The Structuralist View -- 24.4 Implications of the Simple View -- 24.5 Implications of the Structuralist View -- 24.6 The Case against Magical Ersatzism Revisited -- 24.7 Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- 25: Primitive Self-Ascription: Lewis on the De Se -- 25.1 Lewis's Method -- 25.2 Lewis's Account of the De Se -- 25.3 Centered Worlds -- 25.4 Attitudes De Re -- 25.5 Some Costs of Primitive Self-Ascription -- 25.6 Conclusion -- Acknowledgments -- Notes
References
In A Companion to David Lewis, Barry Loewer and Jonathan Schaffer bring together top philosophers to explain, discuss, and critically extend Lewis's seminal work in original ways. Students and scholars will discover the underlying themes and complex interconnections woven through the diverse range of his work in metaphysics, philosophy of language, logic, epistemology, philosophy of science, philosophy of mind, ethics, and aesthetics. The first and only comprehensive study of the work of David Lewis, one of the most systematic and influential philosophers of the latter half of the 20th century Contributions shed light on the underlying themes and complex interconnections woven through Lewis's work across his enormous range of influence, including metaphysics, language, logic, epistemology, science, mind, ethics, and aesthetics Outstanding Lewis scholars and leading philosophers working in the fields Lewis influenced explain, discuss, and critically extend Lewis's work in original ways An essential resource for students and researchers across analytic philosophy that covers the major themes of Lewis's work
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Loewer, Barry A Companion to David Lewis Somerset : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2015 9781118388181
Subject Lewis, David K. -- (David Kellogg), -- 1941-2001.;Philosophy, American -- 20th century
Electronic books
Alt Author Schaffer, Jonathan
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