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020    |z9781118273289 
035    (MiAaPQ)EBC887385 
035    (Au-PeEL)EBL887385 
035    (CaPaEBR)ebr10558076 
035    (OCoLC)784887025 
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050  4 N5630 -- .C716 2012eb 
082 0  709.38 
100 1  Smith, Tyler Jo 
245 12 A Companion to Greek Art 
250    1st ed 
264  1 Hoboken :|bJohn Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,|c2012 
264  4 |c©2011 
300    1 online resource (891 pages) 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    computer|bc|2rdamedia 
338    online resource|bcr|2rdacarrier 
490 1  Blackwell Companions to the Ancient World Ser. ;|vv.184 
505 0  Intro -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- List 
       of Illustrations -- List of Color Plates -- List of Maps -
       - Notes on Contributors -- Preface -- Part I Introduction 
       -- Chapter 1 The Greeks and their Art -- 1.1 Greek Art and
       Classical Archaeology -- 1.2 Greek Art after the Greeks --
       1.3 A Companion to Greek Art -- Part II Forms, Times, and 
       Places -- Chapter 2 Chronology and Topography -- 2.1 
       Chronology -- 2.2 Topography -- 2.3 Conclusion -- Further 
       Reading -- Chapter 3 Greek Decorated Pottery I: Athenian 
       Vase-painting -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Late Bronze Age 
       and Sub-Mycenaean -- 3.3 Protogeometric -- 3.4 Geometric -
       - 3.5 Protoattic -- 3.6 Painters and Techniques -- 3.7 
       Black-figure -- 3.8 Red-figure -- 3.9 Trade and 
       Distribution -- 3.10 Pictures -- 3.11 Shapes -- 3.12 
       Chronology -- Further Reading -- Chapter 4 Greek Decorated
       Pottery II: Regions and Workshops -- 4.1 Introduction -- 
       4.2 Corinthian -- 4.3 Boeotian -- 4.4 Euboean -- 4.5 
       Lakonian -- 4.6 Elean -- 4.7 Cycladic -- 4.8 Cretan -- 4.9
       East Greek -- 4.10 Northern Greek -- 4.11 Conclusion -- 
       Acknowledgments -- Further Reading -- Chapter 5 Free-
       standing and Relief Sculpture -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 
       The Geometric Period -- 5.3 The Archaic Period -- 5.4 The 
       Classical Period -- 5.5 The Hellenistic Period -- Further 
       Reading -- Chapter 6 Architecture in City and Sanctuary --
       6.1 Early Development in Greek Architecture -- 6.2 Forms 
       and Conventions -- 6.3 The Temples -- 6.4 Other Buildings 
       in Sanctuaries -- 6.5 City Planning -- 6.6 Public 
       Structures in Greek Cities -- 6.7 Residential Structures -
       - 6.8 Tombs -- Further Reading -- Chapter 7 Architectural 
       Sculpture -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Polychromy -- 7.3 
       Pediments -- 7.4 Friezes -- 7.5 Metopes -- 7.6 Acroteria -
       - 7.7 Sculptured Column Drums -- 7.8 Sculptured Ceiling 
       Coffers -- 7.9 Caryatids and Telamons -- 7.10 Parapets 
505 8  7.11 Medallion Busts -- 7.12 Testimonia -- Further Reading
       -- Chapter 8 Wall- and Panel-painting -- 8.1 Introduction 
       -- 8.2 Techniques and Pigments -- 8.3 Tetrachromy, 
       Polychromy, Skiagraphia -- 8.4 From Mimesis to Visual 
       Trickery -- 8.5 The Evidence from Macedonian Tombs -- 8.6 
       Painting at the Time of Alexander and Later -- 8.7 
       Skenographia and the Invention of the Landscape -- 8.8 Art
       Criticism -- Further Reading -- Chapter 9 Mosaics -- 9.1 
       Pebble Mosaics: Origins, Function, and Design -- 9.2 Style
       and Chronology of Pebble Mosaics -- 9.3 Alternative 
       Techniques, and the Development of Tessellated Mosaic -- 
       9.4 Tessellated Mosaics: Function and Meaning -- Further 
       Reading -- Chapter 10 Luxury Arts -- 10.1 Introduction -- 
       10.2 Jewelry -- 10.3 Metal Vessels -- 10.4 Engraved Gems -
       - 10.5 Finger Rings -- Further Reading -- Chapter 11 
       Terracottas -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Technology -- 
       11.3 Types and Functions of Terracotta Figures -- 11.4 
       Terracottas, Bronzes, and Other Sculpture -- Further 
       Reading -- Chapter 12 Coinages -- 12.1 Availability -- 
       12.2 Iconography -- 12.3 Opportunities -- 12.4 Weaknesses 
       -- 12.5 The Die-engravers -- 12.6 Conclusion -- Further 
       Reading -- Chapter 13 Workshops and Technology -- 13.1 
       Craft Workshops and the Community in the Greek World -- 
       13.2 The Potter's Workshop -- 13.3 The Smith's Workshop --
       13.4 The Sculptor's Workshop -- 13.5 Workshops -- 13.6 
       Borrowings and Breakthroughs -- 13.7 Social Standing and 
       Appreciation -- Further Reading -- Chapter 14 Ancient 
       Writers on Art -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Inscriptions -
       - 14.3 Artists' Treatises -- 14.4 Pliny and Pausanias -- 
       14.5 Homer and the Poets -- 14.6 Orators, Rhetoricians, 
       and Essayists -- 14.7 Philosophers -- 14.8 Historians and 
       Others -- 14.9 Conclusion -- Further Reading -- Part III 
       Contacts and Colonies -- Chapter 15 Egypt and North Africa
505 8  15.1 Greeks in Egypt: Pre-Archaic Contacts (before 7th 
       century BCE) -- 15.2 Greeks in Egypt: Archaic Contact -- 
       15.3 Naukratis -- 15.4 Other Sites -- 15.5 Decorated 
       Pottery and Transport Amphorae -- 15.6 The Persian 
       Conquest to the Ptolemies -- 15.7 Greek Colonies in North 
       Africa -- 15.8 Conclusion -- Further Reading -- Chapter 16
       Cyprus and the Near East -- 16.1 Introduction -- 16.2 The 
       Greeks in Cyprus -- 16.3 The Greeks in Syria and the 
       Levant -- 16.4 The Greeks in Persia -- 16.5 Conclusion -- 
       Further Reading -- Chapter 17 Asia Minor -- 17.1 
       Introduction -- 17.2 Ionian Migration -- 17.3 Temples: An 
       Exemplary Form of Greek Art and Architecture -- 17.4 
       Ionian, Phrygian, and Lydian Sculpture and Art -- 17.5 The
       Classical Period -- 17.6 The Hellenization of Dynastic 
       Lycia -- 17.7 Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic 
       Kingdoms -- 17.8 Sagalassos: From Rural Settlement to 
       Hellenized Greek City -- Further Reading -- Chapter 18 The
       Black Sea -- 18.1 Introduction -- 18.2 First Traces of 
       Greek Contacts -- 18.3 Foundation of Colonies and Greek 
       Pottery Finds -- 18.4 Constitutions, Public Life, and 
       Coinage -- 18.5 Agriculture, Handicrafts, and Fishing -- 
       18.6 Art and Warfare -- 18.7 Religion -- 18.8 Architecture
       -- 18.9 Sculpture, Painting, and Minor Arts -- 18.10 
       Graves and Burials -- 18.11 Greeks and Scythians -- 18.12 
       Greeks and Thracians -- 18.13 Eastern and Southern Black 
       Sea -- Further Reading -- Chapter 19 Sicily and South 
       Italy -- 19.1 Introduction -- 19.2 Late Geometric and 
       Orientalizing -- 19.3 Archaic -- 19.4 Early Classical -- 
       19.5 High Classical -- 19.6 Late Classical -- 19.7 
       Hellenistic -- 19.8 Conclusion -- Further Reading -- Part 
       IV Contacts and Colonies -- Chapter 20 Olympian Gods at 
       Home and Abroad -- 20.1 Introduction -- 20.2 The Gods on 
       the Parthenon Frieze -- 20.3 Gods on Earth: The Wedding of
       Peleus and Thetis 
505 8  20.4 Warfare and the Gods -- 20.5 A Hero Among the Gods --
       20.6 Epilogue: Gods and Mortals on the Parthenon -- 
       Further Reading -- Chapter 21 Politics and Society -- 21.1
       Introduction -- 21.2 Burial and Cultic Evidence, 
       Iconography, and Iron Age Society -- 21.3 Tyrants, 
       Aristocrats, and their Impact on Art in the Archaic Period
       -- 21.4 Images and Dedications of Famous and Anonymous 
       People -- 21.5 The Impact of the Persian Wars on Early 
       Classical Art (c. 490-450 bc) -- 21.6 Interaction of Civic
       Life and Visual Arts during the Classical Period -- 21.7 
       Epilogue: Hellenistic Art, Rulers, and Society -- Further 
       Reading -- Chapter 22 Personification: Not Just a Symbolic
       Mode -- 22.1 Introduction -- 22.2 Personification in Greek
       Art -- 22.3 Personification and Agency -- Further Reading 
       -- Chapter 23 The Non-Greek in Greek Art -- 23.1 
       Introduction -- 23.2 Encountering the Uncivilized -- 23.3 
       Pre-Classical Amazons -- 23.4 Legendary Trojans -- 23.5 
       Encountering Non-Greeks -- 23.6 Greeks versus Persians: 
       Non-Greek Others in Monumental Art of the Classical Period
       -- 23.7 Conclusion -- Further Reading -- Chapter 24 Birth,
       Marriage, and Death -- 24.1 Introduction -- 24.2 Birth -- 
       24.3 Marriage -- 24.4 Death -- Further Reading -- Chapter 
       25 Age, Gender, and Social Identity -- 24.1 Introduction -
       - 24.2 Birth -- 24.3 Marriage -- 24.4 Death -- Further 
       Reading -- Chapter 25 Age, Gender, and Social Identity -- 
       25.1 Introduction -- 25.2 Geometric to Archaic -- 25.3 
       Classical -- 25.4 Hellenistic -- Further Reading -- 
       Chapter 26 Sex, Gender, and Sexuality -- 26.1 Introduction
       -- 26.2 The Seeming Transparency of Greek Art -- 26.3 Sex 
       -- 26.4 Gender -- 26.5 Sexuality -- 26.6 Heterosexuality -
       - 26.7 Homosexuality -- 26.8 Conclusion -- Further Reading
       -- Chapter 27 Drinking and Dining -- 27.1 Introduction 
505 8  27.2 The Changing Role of Dining from the Bronze Age to 
       the Classical Period -- 27.3 The Symposion: A Definition -
       - 27.4 The Development of the Symposion -- 27.5 Sympotic 
       Equipment -- 27.6 Decoration on Sympotic Vases -- 27.7 The
       Export Market -- 27.8 Drinking, Dining, and Greek Culture 
       -- Further Reading -- Chapter 28 Competition, Festival, 
       and Performance -- 28.1 Introduction -- 28.2 Athlete, 
       Sport, and Games -- 28.3 Dance, Drama, and Dithyramb -- 
       28.4 'Tenella Kallinike' ('Hurrah, Fair Victor!') -- 
       Further Reading -- Chapter 29 Figuring Religious Ritual --
       29.1 Introduction -- 29.2 Sacrifice, Procession, 
       Consumption -- 29.3 Space, Gestures, Time -- 29.4 
       Dionysian Imagery -- Further Reading -- Chapter 30 Agency 
       in Greek Art -- 30.1 Introduction: Agency and Pausanias --
       30.2 Concepts of Agency -- 30.3 From the François Vase to 
       the Euphronios Krater -- 30.4 Myron's Diskobolos -- 30.5 
       Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- Further Reading -- Part 
       V Greek Art: Ancient to Antique -- Chapter 31 Greek Art 
       through Roman Eyes -- 31.1 Introduction -- 31.2 Greek Art 
       as Roman Art, and Vice Versa: The Tabula Iliaca Capitolina
       -- 31.3 Greek Art as Roman Cultural Capital: 'Cubiculum B'
       in the Villa Farnesina -- 31.4 Greek Art and Roman Decor: 
       The Sperlonga Grotto -- 31.5 Conclusion: Greek Art through
       Roman Eyes -- Further Reading -- Chapter 32 Greek Art in 
       Late Antiquity and Byzantium -- 32.1 Introduction -- 32.2 
       Athens -- 32.3 Constantinople -- Further Reading -- 
       Chapter 33 The Antique Legacy from the Middle Ages to the 
       Enlightenment -- 33.1 Introduction -- 33.2 The Medieval 
       Period -- 33.3 The Renaissance -- 33.4 The Age of 
       Enlightenment -- 33.5 Conclusion -- Acknowledgement -- 
       Further Reading -- Chapter 34 Greek Art and the Grand Tour
       -- 34.1 The Grand Tour in Outline -- 34.2 Greek Art in 
       Italy -- 34.3 What They Saw on the Grand Tour 
505 8  34.4 Emma Hamilton's Attitudes 
520    A comprehensive, authoritative account of the development 
       Greek Art through the 1st millennium BC.  An invaluable 
       resource for scholars dealing with the art, material 
       culture and history of the post-classical world Includes 
       voices from such diverse fields as art history, classical 
       studies, and archaeology and offers a diversity of views 
       to the topic Features an innovative group of chapters 
       dealing with the reception of Greek art from the Middle 
       Ages to the present Includes chapters on Chronology and 
       Topography, as well as Workshops and Technology Includes 
       four major sections: Forms, Times and Places; Contacts and
       Colonies; Images and Meanings; Greek Art: Ancient to 
       Antique 
588    Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other
       sources 
590    Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest 
       Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access 
       may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated 
       libraries 
650  0 Art, Greek -- History 
655  4 Electronic books 
700 1  Plantzos, Dimitris 
776 08 |iPrint version:|aSmith, Tyler Jo|tA Companion to Greek 
       Art|dHoboken : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2012
       |z9781118273289 
830  0 Blackwell Companions to the Ancient World Ser 
856 40 |uhttps://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/sinciatw/
       detail.action?docID=887385|zClick to View