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Author Schenker, David
Title A Companion to Greek Literature
Imprint Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2015
©2015
book jacket
Edition 1st ed
Descript 1 online resource (763 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series Blackwell Companions to the Ancient World Ser
Blackwell Companions to the Ancient World Ser
Note Intro -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- List of Illustrations -- Notes on Contributors -- Abbreviations -- Introduction: A Companion to Greek Literature -- 1. Companion versus History of Literature -- 2. What is "Greek Literature"? -- 3. The Concept of this Companion -- 4. Acknowledgments -- Notes -- References -- Part I Production and Transmission -- Chapter 1 Mechanics and Means of Production in Antiquity -- 1. Overview -- 2. Writing Materials -- 3. Writing Practices and Text Composition -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 2 A Wound, not a World: Textual Survival and Transmission -- 1. The Extent of Our Known Losses -- 2. Tales of Survival and Recovery -- 3. Transmission: Copying, Editing, and Textual Criticism -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Part II Greek Literature as a Dynamic System -- Chapter 3 Orality and Literacy: Ancient Greek Literature as Oral Literature -- 1. Oral Features of Ancient Greek Epic -- 2. Oral-Formulaic Theory and Homeric Epic -- 3. Internal Evidence for Orality in Homeric Epic -- 4. From Oral Performance to Written Text -- 5. Homeric Epic as Written Text -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 4 Literature in the Archaic Age -- 1. Literature, Lyric, Performance -- 2. Rhapsody and Citharody -- 3. An Interactive Performance Culture -- 4. Rhapsodes and Citharodes in Performance -- 5. Sympotic Lyric -- 6. Lesbian Melic -- 7. Lydian Glamour -- 8. The Tyrant's Symposium -- 9. Choral Melic -- 10. Epinician Melic -- 11. Public Elegy and Iambus -- 12. Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 5 Literature in the Classical Age of Greece -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 6 Literature in the Hellenistic World -- 1. Literary Contexts -- 2. Literary Constructs -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading
Chapter 7 Greek Literature in the Roman World: Introducing Imperial Greek Literature -- 1. Intellectual Culture -- 2. The City -- 3. Rome -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 8 The Encounter with Christianity -- 1. Two Different Cultures? -- 2. Distance and Rejection -- 3. The Correct Use -- 4. The Decisive Shift -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Part III Genres -- Chapter 9 Greek Epic -- I -- 1. Iliad and Odyssey -- 2. Theogony and Works and Days -- II -- 3. Aratus's Phaenomena -- 4. Apollonius of Rhodes's Argonautica -- 5. Battle of the Frogs and Mice (Batrachomyomachia) -- III -- 6. Quintus's The Fall of Troy -- 7. Nonnus's Dionysiaca -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 10 Lyric: Melic, Iambic, Elegiac -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Field of Greek Lyric -- 3. Iambos -- 4. Elegy -- 5. Melos -- 6. Rethinking Ancient Greek Lyric -- 7. "Lyric" Genre -- 8. Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 11 The Ethics of Greek Drama -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 12 Epigram and Minor Genres -- 1. Introduction -- 2. From Stone to Book -- 3. The Textuality of Epigram Books -- 4. The Traveling Reader -- 5. The New Posidippus -- 6. A Sequential Reading of Lucillius Anth. Pal. 11.75-7 -- 7. "The Sting of Love": Variations on a Theme -- 8. Technopaegnia -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 13 Oratory: Practice and Theory -- 1. The Early Development of Oratory and Rhetoric -- 2. The Canon of Ten Attic Orators -- 3. Rhetorical Theory of the Classical Period -- 4. Oratory and Rhetoric in the Hellenistic Period -- 5. Oratory and Rhetoric in the Roman Empire -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 14 Historiography and Biography -- 1. Historiography -- 2. Biography -- References -- Further Reading
Chapter 15 Philosophical Writing: Treatise, Dialogue, Diatribe, Epistle -- 1. Monologic Instruction -- 2. The Dialogue -- 3. Special Forms of Philosophical Writing -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 16 The Novel -- 1. An Un-classical Research Field and a Problem of Terminology -- 2. The Lack of an Ancient Theory and the Question of Genre -- 3. The Love Novel and the Importance of the "Big Five" -- 4. Fragmentary Love Novels -- 5. Family Novels -- 6. Lowlife Novels -- 7. Fringe Novels -- 8. The Elasticity of the Greek Novel -- 9. On the Origin and Significance of the Greek (Love) Novel -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 17 Technical Literature -- 1. Introduction -- 2. What is "Technical Literature"? -- 3. Approaches to Ancient Technical Literature -- 4. Some General Characteristics of Ancient Technical Texts -- 5. Some Examples of Greek Technical Writing -- 6. Conclusion -- References -- Further Reading -- Part IV The Players -- Chapter 18 The Creators of Literature -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Archaic Poets -- 3. Fifth-century Poets -- 4. Prose Writers -- 5. Writers in the Hellenistic Era -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 19 Users of Literature -- 1. Hearers and Readers -- 2. Scholars and Interpreters: Ancient Literary Criticism -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 20 Sponsors and Enemies of Literature -- 1. Homeric Song and Singers in Homer -- 2. Archaic Age Patronage -- 3. Classical Athens: Civic Patronage -- 4. Hellenistic Patronage -- 5. Patronage for Greeks in Rome -- 6. Opposition -- 7. Responses to Plato -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Part V The Places -- Chapter 21 Places of Production -- 1. Sparta -- 2. Miletus -- 3. Athens -- 4. Alexandria -- 5. Pergamon -- 6. Rome -- 7. Constantinople -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 22 Places of presentation -- 1. Dais
2. Symposium -- 3. Festival -- 4. Court -- 5. School -- 6. Literature Presented in Public Space -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 23 Topos and Topoi -- 1. Iliad -- 2. Odyssey -- 3. Tragic Troy -- 4. Tragic Athens -- 5. Comic Athens -- 6. The Setting of Plato's Phaedrus -- 7. Bucolic Landscape in Theocritus's Idylls -- 8. The Pastoral Romance of Longus -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Part VI Literature and Knowledge -- Chapter 24 Literature and Truth -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 25 Knowledge of Self -- 1. Literature's Power to Define Borderlines -- 2. Defining the "Self": "Self" and Other -- 3. Humans and Gods -- 4. Humans and Beasts -- 5. Humans and Monsters -- 6. Men and Women -- 7. Greeks and Barbarians -- 8. Conclusion -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 26 Explicit Knowledge -- 1. Archaic Didactic Poetry -- 2. The Career of Prose -- 3. The Aesthetic Presentation of Explicit Knowledge -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 27 Implicit Knowledge -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 28 Preserved Knowledge: Summaries and Compilations -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Summaries -- 3. Compilations -- 4. The Communicative Function of Summaries and Compilations -- References -- Further Reading -- Part VII Literature and Aesthetics -- Chapter 29 The Language of Greek Literature -- 1. Prehistoric Roots -- 2. Literature and Dialect(s) -- 3. The Language of Epic, Elegy, and Epigram -- 4. The Language of Choral and Monodic Lyric -- 5. The Language of Iambus, Comedy, and Tragedy -- 6. The Language of Prose -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 30 Poetic Devices in Greek Literature: Pleasure and Creative Appropriation -- 1. The Shield: Pleasure and New Realizations of Traditional Devices -- 2. Apollonius and 'Textualized' Epic
3. Euripides and the Performance Culture of Athenian Drama -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 31 The Function of Literature -- 1. To Improve Men in the City -- 2. The Longing for a Poet -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Part VIII The Reception of Greek Literature -- Chapter 32 Trends in Greek Literature in the Contemporary Academy -- 1. Preliminaries -- 2. Beginnings: Germany and Britain in the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Century -- 3. American Hellenic History -- 4. Greek Literary Studies as a Subset of Literary and Cultural Studies -- 5. Performance -- Canonicity -- Theory -- Notes -- References -- Further Reading -- Chapter 33 The Reception of Ancient Greek Literature and Western Identity -- Notes -- References -- Index -- EULA
A Companion to Greek Literature presents a comprehensive introduction to the wide range of texts and literary forms produced in the Greek language over the course of a millennium beginning from the 6th century BCE up to the early years of the Byzantine Empire. Features contributions from a wide range of established experts and emerging scholars of Greek literature Offers comprehensive coverage of the many genres and literary forms produced by the ancient Greeks-including epic and lyric poetry, oratory, historiography, biography, philosophy, the novel, and technical literature Includes readings that address the production and transmission of ancient Greek texts, historic reception, individual authors, and much more Explores the subject of ancient Greek literature in innovative ways
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Schenker, David A Companion to Greek Literature Hoboken : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2015 9781118886946
Subject Greek literature -- History and criticism.;Greek literature.;Literature
Electronic books
Alt Author Hose, Martin
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