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Author Goldberg, Jessica L
Title Trade and Institutions in the Medieval Mediterranean : The Geniza Merchants and their Business World
Imprint Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2012
©2012
book jacket
Descript 1 online resource (450 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
Series Cambridge Studies in Economic History - Second Series
Cambridge Studies in Economic History - Second Series
Note Cover -- Trade and Institutions in the Medieval Mediterranean -- Series -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Figures -- Maps -- Tables -- Acknowledgments -- Technical notes -- Personal names -- Place names and regional names -- Money, prices, and weights -- Language: transliteration, transcription, and translation -- Abbreviations -- 1 Introduction: two tales -- 1.1 A medieval story: the bale on the beach -- 1.2 A modern story: three scholars and a piece of paper -- 1.3 The problem of the sources -- 1.4 Medieval and modern stories: a scholarly conversation -- Part 1 Institutions -- 2 Merchants in their community -- 2.1 Writing the lives of merchants: Nahray b. Nissīm -- 2.2 Merchants as a group: identification and self-definition -- 2.3 The geography of settlement: homes, origins, and migrations -- 2.4 Class and social position in Jewish community -- 2.5 Position in the Islamic community -- 3 The uses of commercial correspondence -- 3.1 Nahray b. Nissīm receives a letter -- 3.2 The shape of commercial correspondence -- 3.3 Content analysis -- Transactions -- Behavior of other merchants -- Business news -- Correspondence -- Non-mercantile affairs and travel tales -- Advice -- Minor business topics -- Three main concerns -- 3.4 Conclusion: the place of letters in commerce and in research -- 4 The nature of merchants' trade -- 4.1 The bundle and the skins -- 4.2 The mix of commodities -- 4.3 Commercial transactions and the work of merchants -- Acquisition -- Transportation -- Selling -- 4.4 Conclusion: economic organization, risk, and labor -- 5 The human landscape: business relationships, institutions of law and government -- 5.1 Yeshu'ā b. Isma'īl: the difficult man -- 5.2 The organization of commercial services: principals, agents, and the group -- 5.3 Choosing agency: a question of management
5.4 Business and the legal system: theory and practice -- 5.5 The state and the merchants -- 5.6 Conclusion -- 6 Conclusion to part I -- Part II Geographies -- 7 The geography of information -- 7.1 Efrayim sends four copies, then five copies -- 7.2 The postal infrastructure and the movement of letters -- 7.3 Letters, information, and the boundaries of trade -- 7.4 The geography of information: connectivity and change in the eleventh century -- 7.5 The boundaries of information: using letters to retrace geography -- 7.6 Conclusions -- 8 Commodities in a regional market -- 8.1 Israel's eye medicine -- 8.2 The nature of regions in al-Shām: central markets, emporia, and hinterlands -- Al-Shām and its regions -- The southern Shām: a region dependent on Fustat -- Northern Shām: emporia and central markets -- 8.3 What it meant to be a hinterland: Fustat as a distributor and consumer of goods -- Distribution: consumption and manufacturing -- Purchasing: merchants from Fustat, merchants from al-Shām -- Mechanisms of monopolization -- 8.4 Conclusion: regions and market hierarchies, cities and metropolises -- 9 Individual geographies of trade -- 9.1 A life in travel: Abu 'Imrān Musā b. Abī l-ayy Khalīla -- 9.2 Connectivity: routes and central places -- Long-distance routes -- Regional routes -- Local travel -- 9.3 Individual itineraries -- 9.4 A Geniza business model -- Production and export -- Vertical integration -- 9.5 Conclusions -- 10 The contracting geography of the eleventh-century merchant network -- 10.1 Salāma b. Musās disastrous year -- 10.2 Two maps: comparing the Nahray generation with other generations of Geniza merchants -- 10.3 Edges -- Looking north and south: edges of knowledge and connections -- The east: changing generations, changing associations, and new strategies -- Looking west: the changing status of al-Andalus
10.4 Centers: intensification -- Ifrīqiyya and Sicily: more ports, dispersion of goods among ports -- Egypt: Fustat and its expanding hinterland -- 10.5 Putting together the pieces: explaining network contraction and intensification -- A question of politics: instability in Ifrīqiyya and Sicily -- Shifting of activities: strategies of risk and a new seasonality -- 10.6 Conclusions -- 11 Conclusion: The Mediterranean through the eyes of Geniza merchants -- 11.1 Putting the Islamic world back into the Mediterranean economy -- 11.2 Institutions, merchants, and the medieval Mediterranean -- Glossary -- Bibliography -- MANUSCRIPT SOURCES -- PRINTED SOURCES -- Index
Reconstructs the business world of the eleventh-century Geniza merchants and, in doing so, rewrites medieval Islamic and Mediterranean economic history
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
Link Print version: Goldberg, Jessica L. Trade and Institutions in the Medieval Mediterranean : The Geniza Merchants and their Business World Cambridge : Cambridge University Press,c2012 9781107005471
Subject Jewish merchants -- Mediterranean Region -- History -- To 1500.;Commerce -- History -- Medieval, 500-1500.;Mediterranean Region -- Commerce -- History
Electronic books
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