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Author Jennings, Patrick R
Title Clio's drumbeat: Gathering and using history in wartime
book jacket
Descript 285 p
Note Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 67-04, Section: A, page: 1498
Adviser: Theodore Karamanski
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Loyola University Chicago, 2006
Beginning with early colonial military experiences, American soldiers be they militia or regular, have sought to learn from the hard-earned lessons of battle. This process, occasionally burdened by a lack of military professionalism and an adherence to a near-mythological heritage, has grown from a personal and informal system of passing lessons from soldier to soldier to a highly regimented system of documenting combat operations for near instantaneous lessons learned and long-term study. Through analysis of diaries, military regulations, archival documents, and interviews with soldiers and leaders in the development of field and combat history procedures, this dissertation investigates the complex process through which the current system of documenting operations and saving US military history came into being, the conflicting narratives between operational history and military heritage, and, ultimately, the ways that the U.S. Army still relies on both an unofficial, informal system and a growing, well-defined doctrine for utilizing history. This dissertation argues that the early failures in the informal system were less a matter of how history was remembered and more a result of a lack of professionalism in the officer corps while the successes in the sanctioned collection of combat history are based on a growing acceptance of the importance of having soldiers who are also academically trained historians in the area of operations. This study illuminates the ways that military success and failure are inevitably incorporated into the official combat doctrine and unofficial heritage of the U.S. Army and thus into the very consciousness of service, citizenship and nationhood
School code: 0112
DDC
Host Item Dissertation Abstracts International 67-04A
Subject History, United States
History, Modern
History, Military
0337
0582
0722
Alt Author Loyola University Chicago
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