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020    9788793102293|q(electronic bk.) 
020    |z9788792329400 
035    (MiAaPQ)EBC3400111 
035    (Au-PeEL)EBL3400111 
035    (CaPaEBR)ebr10822779 
035    (OCoLC)874968170 
040    MiAaPQ|beng|erda|epn|cMiAaPQ|dMiAaPQ 
050  4 TJ223.P76.D39 2010 
100 1  Dawoud, Shenouda 
245 10 Digital System Design :|bUse of Microcontroller 
264  1 Aalborg :|bRiver Publishers,|c2010 
264  4 |c©2010 
300    1 online resource (570 pages) 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    computer|bc|2rdamedia 
338    online resource|bcr|2rdacarrier 
490 1  River Publishers Series in Signal, Image and Speech 
       Processing Ser 
505 0  Cover -- Contents -- List of Abbreviations -- 1 Processor 
       Design Metrics -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Common Design 
       Metrics -- 1.3 Performance Design Metrics -- 1.3.1 
       Characteristics of a Good Performance Metric -- 1.3.2 Some
       Popular Performance Metrics -- 1.3.3 Analysing Algorithms 
       -- 1.4 Economic Design Metrics -- 1.4.1 Time-to-Market -- 
       1.4.2 Design Economics -- 1.5 Power Design Metrics -- 
       1.5.1 Reducing Power Consumption -- 1.6 System 
       Effectiveness Metrics -- 1.6.1 Reliability, 
       Maintainability and Availability Metrics -- 1.7 Summary of
       the Chapter -- 1.8 Review Questions -- 2 A System Approach
       to Digital System Design -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 System
       Design Flow -- 2.2.1 Requirement Analysis -- 2.2.2 
       Specifications -- 2.2.3 Functional Design: System 
       Architecture -- 2.2.4 Hardware Overview -- 2.2.5 Software 
       Overview -- 2.2.6 Target System and Solution -- 2.3 
       Technologies Involved in the Design Process -- 2.4 Design 
       Technology -- 2.4.1 Design Partitioning -- 2.4.2 Use of 
       Multiple Views (Multiple Description Domains): The Y-Chart
       -- 2.4.3 Use of Structured Design: Functional Block-
       Structured Top-Down Design (Structural Hierarchy) -- 2.4.4
       Design Procedure Based on Top-Down Approach -- 2.4.5 
       Programmable Digital Systems Design Using Block Structured
       Design -- 2.5 IC-Technology -- Implementation Technology -
       - 2.5.1 Programmable Logic Device (PLD) -- 2.6 Processor 
       Technology -- 2.6.1 Use of General-Purpose Processor (GPP)
       -- 2.6.2 Single-Purpose Processor -- 2.6.3 Application 
       Specific Processor (e.g. Use of Microcontroller and DSP) -
       - 2.6.4 Summary of IC Technology and Processor Technology 
       -- 2.7 Summary of the Chapter -- 2.8 Review Questions -- 3
       Introduction to Microprocessors and Microcontrollers -- 
       3.1 Introduction -- 3.1.1 Processor Architecture and 
       Microarchitecture -- 3.2 The Microprocessor -- 3.2.1 
       General-Purpose Registers 
505 8  3.2.2 Arithmetic and Logic Unit (ALU) -- 3.2.3 Control 
       Unit -- 3.2.4 I/O Control Section (Bus Interface Unit) -- 
       3.2.5 Internal Buses -- 3.2.6 System Clocks -- 3.2.7 Basic
       Microprocessor Organization -- 3.3 Microcontrollers -- 
       3.3.1 Microcontroller Internal Structure -- 3.4 
       Microprocessor-Based and Microcontroller-Based Systems -- 
       3.4.1 Microprocessor-based and Microcontroller-based 
       Digital Systems Design Using Top-Down Technique -- 3.5 
       Practical Microcontrollers -- 3.5.1 AVR ATmega8515 
       Microcontroller -- 3.5.2 Intel 8051 Microcontroller -- 3.6
       Summary of the Chapter -- 3.7 Review Questions -- 4 
       Instructions And Instruction Set -- 4.1 Introduction -- 
       4.2 Instruction Format -- 4.2.1 Expressing Numbers -- 
       4.2.2 Basic Instruction Cycle -- Execution Path of an 
       Instruction -- 4.2.3 Clock Cycle and Instruction Cycle -- 
       4.2.4 Labels -- 4.3 Describing the Instruction Cycle: Use 
       of Register Transfer Language (RTL) -- 4.3.1 Register 
       Transfer Language (RTL) -- 4.3.2 Use of RTL to Describe 
       the Instruction Cycle -- 4.4 Instruction Classifications 
       According to Number of Operands -- 4.5 Addressing Modes --
       4.6 Immediate Addressing Mode -- 4.6.1 Advantages of 
       Immediate Addressing -- 4.6.2 AVR Instructions with 
       Immediate Addressing -- 4.7 Direct (Absolute) Addressing 
       Mode -- 4.7.1 Register Direct Addressing -- 4.7.2 Memory 
       Direct Addressing -- 4.8 Indirect Addressing Mode -- 4.8.1
       AVR Indirect Addressing -- 4.8.2 Variation on the Theme --
       4.9 Displacement Addressing -- 4.9.1 Address Register 
       Indirect with Displacement (also called "Base-Register 
       Addressing") -- 4.9.2 Data Indirect with Displacement -- 
       4.10 Relative Addressing Mode -- 4.11 Programme Memory 
       Addressing -- 4.12 Stack Addressing -- 4.13 Programme 
       Control Instructions -- 4.13.1 Jumps, Branch and Call in 
       AVR Architecture -- 4.14 I/O and Interrupts -- 4.15 
       Summary of Addressing Modes -- 4.16 Review Questions 
505 8  5 Machine Language and Assembly Language -- 5.1 
       Introduction -- 5.2 Directives: Pseudo-Instructions -- 
       5.2.1 Macros -- 5.2.2 ATMEL AVR Studio -- 5.3 Design of an
       Assembly Language Programme -- 5.3.1 The Basic Programming
       Method -- 5.4 Use of Template: Examples -- 5.5 Data 
       Manipulations: Examples -- 5.5.1 Copying Block of Data -- 
       5.5.2 Arithmetic Calculations -- 5.5.3 Software-generation
       of Time Delays -- 5.6 Summary of the Chapter -- 5.7 Review
       Questions -- 6 System Memory -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 
       Memory Classification -- 6.3 Memory Response Time -- 6.3.1
       Random Access (also, Immediate Access) -- 6.3.2 Sequential
       Access (also, Serial Access) -- 6.3.3 Direct Access -- 6.4
       Semiconductor Memory -- 6.4.1 Read-Only Memory (ROM) -- 
       6.4.2 Read-Write Memory (RWM or RAM) -- 6.5 Interfacing 
       Memory to Processor -- 6.5.1 Memory Organization -- 6.5.2 
       Address Decoding -- 6.5.3 Accessing Memory: Timing Diagram
       -- 6.6 AVR Memory System -- 6.6.1 Flash Code Memory Map --
       6.6.2 Data Memory Map -- 6.6.3 SRAM Data Memory -- 6.6.4 
       EEPROM Memory -- 6.7 Intel Memory System -- 6.7.1 Internal
       Code Memory of 8751/8951 -- 6.7.2 Adding External Code 
       Memory Chip -- 6.7.3 Adding Extra RAM -- 6.7.4 Adding both
       External EPROM and RAM -- 6.8 Summary of the Chapter -- 
       6.9 Review Questions -- 7 Timers, Counters and Watchdog 
       Timer -- 7.1 Introduction to Timers and Counters -- 7.1.1 
       Counters -- 7.1.2 Timers -- 7.2 Uses and Types of Timers: 
       Programmable Interval Timer (PIT) -- 7.2.1 Uses of Timers 
       -- 7.2.2 Types of Timers -- 7.2.3 PIT General 
       Configuration -- 7.3 Microcontroller Timers/Counters: AVR 
       Timers/Counters -- 7.3.1 AVR Timers/Counters -- 7.3.2 
       Counter Unit -- 7.3.3 Output Compare Unit -- 7.4 TIMER 0 -
       - 7.5 Timer 1 -- 7.5.1 Timer 1 Prescaler and Selector -- 
       7.5.2 Accessing the 16-bit Timer 1 Registers -- 7.5.3 
       Timer 1 Input Capture Mode -- 7.5.4 Timer 1 Output Compare
       Mode 
505 8  7.5.5 Timer 1 Pulse Width Modulator Mode -- 7.6 Timer 2 --
       7.7 Watchdog Timer -- 7.7.1 Introduction to Watchdog Timer
       -- 7.7.2 AVR Internal Watchdog Timer -- 7.7.3 Handling the
       Watchdog Timer -- 7.8 Timer Applications -- 7.8.1 
       Application 1: Measuring Digital Signal in Time Domain -- 
       7.8.2 Application 2: Measuring Unknown Frequency -- 7.8.3 
       Application 3: Wave Generation -- 7.8.4 Application 4: Use
       of PWM Mode: DC and Servo Motors Control -- 7.8.5 
       Application 5: Stepper Motors -- 7.9 Summary of the 
       Chapter -- 7.10 Review Questions -- 8 Interface to Local 
       Devices - Analogue Data and Analogue Input/Output 
       Subsystems -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Analogue Data and 
       Analogue I/O Subsystems -- 8.2.1 Analogue Input and 
       Analogue Output Subsystems -- 8.2.2 Components of an 
       Analogue Input Subsystem: Data Acquisition System (DAS) --
       8.2.3 Components for an Analogue Output Subsystem -- 8.3 
       Digital-to-Analogue Converters (DACs) -- 8.3.1 Ideal DACs 
       -- 8.3.2 DAC Implementation Techniques -- 8.3.3 DAC to 
       System Bus Interface -- 8.4 Analogue-to-Digital Conversion
       (ADC) -- 8.4.1 Conversion Techniques: Direct Conversion 
       Techniques -- 8.4.2 Conversion Techniques: Indirect 
       Conversion -- 8.4.3 Summing up ADC: Data Acquisition 
       System Design -- 8.5 AVR Analogue Peripherals -- 8.5.1 ADC
       Peripheral -- 8.5.2 Analogue Comparator Peripheral -- 8.6 
       Some Practical ADC: The ADC0809 IC -- 8.6.1 Connecting the
       ADC0809 to Intel 8051 -- 8.6.2 Examples of Software Needed
       for ADC -- 8.7 Digital-to-Analogue Conversion Interface --
       8.7.1 The DAC0832 IC -- 8.7.2 Connecting the 8051 to the 
       DAC0832 -- 8.7.3 Example of Software Needed for DAC -- 
       8.7.4 Examples of controlling two DACs from an 8051 -- 8.8
       Summary of the Chapter -- 8.9 Review Questions -- 9 
       Multiprocessor Communications (Network - Based Interface) 
       -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Serial Communications Channels 
505 8  9.2.1 Synchronization Techniques -- 9.3 Asynchronous 
       Serial Communication: UART -- 9.3.1 Data Recovery and 
       Timing -- 9.3.2 Serial Communication Interface -- 9.3.3 
       AVR UART/USART -- 9.4 The EIA-232 Standard -- 9.4.1 
       Standard Details -- 9.4.2 Implementation Examples -- 9.5 
       Inter-Integrated Circuits (I2C) -- 9.5.1 The I2C Bus 
       Hardware Structure -- 9.5.2 Basic Operation: How it works?
       -- 9.5.3 I2C Modes -- 9.5.4 I2C as a Multi-Master Bus: Bus
       Arbitration -- 9.5.5 Applications Using I2C Bus -- 9.6 
       Controller Area Network (CAN) -- 9.6.1 Some Features of 
       CAN Bus -- 9.6.2 CAN Architecture: CAN and OSI Model -- 
       9.6.3 The CAN Physical Layer -- 9.6.4 Synchronization 
       Mechanisms used in CAN -- 9.6.5 CAN Data Link Layer -- 
       9.6.6 Frame Types and Frame Format -- 9.6.7 Using CAN Bus 
       -- 9.7 Serial Communication Using SPI -- 9.7.1 Synchronous
       Serial Transmission -- 9.7.2 Serial Peripheral Interface 
       (SPI) -- 9.7.3 Basic Data Transmission -- 9.7.4 Connecting
       Devices on SPI Bus -- 9.7.5 SPI Applications -- 9.7.6 
       Strengths and Weaknesses of SPI -- 9.7.7 Differences 
       between SPI and I2C -- 9.7.8 Examples of Using SPI -- 9.8 
       Summary of the Chapter -- 9.9 Review Questions -- 
       References -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- H -- 
       I -- L -- M -- O -- P -- R -- S -- T -- U -- W 
588    Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other
       sources 
590    Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest 
       Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access 
       may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated 
       libraries 
650  0 Microcontrollers.;Digital integrated 
       circuits.;Microprocessors 
655  4 Electronic books 
700 1  Peplow, R 
776 08 |iPrint version:|aDawoud, Shenouda|tDigital System Design 
       : Use of Microcontroller|dAalborg : River Publishers,c2010
       |z9788792329400 
830  0 River Publishers Series in Signal, Image and Speech 
       Processing Ser 
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