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050  4 HC79.E5 -- D56 2013eb 
082 0  363.73874 
100 1  Dinar, Ariel 
245 14 The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) :|bAn Early History 
       of Unanticipated Outcomes 
264  1 Singapore :|bWorld Scientific Publishing Co Pte Ltd,|c2013
264  4 |c©2013 
300    1 online resource (321 pages) 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    computer|bc|2rdamedia 
338    online resource|bcr|2rdacarrier 
490 1  World Scientific Series on the Economics of Climate Change
       Ser. ;|vv.1 
505 0  Intro -- CONTENTS -- Acknowledgments -- About the Authors 
       -- Chapter 1. Clean Development Mechanism: Past, Present, 
       and Future -- ABOUT THIS BOOK -- BOOK OUTLINE -- BOOK 
       CHAPTERS -- An Updated Review of Carbon Markets, 
       Institutions, Policies, and Research -- The Activities 
       Implemented Jointly Pilots: A Foundation for Clean 
       Development Mechanism? -- Cost of Mitigation under the 
       Clean Development Mechanism -- Diffusion of Kyoto's Clean 
       Development Mechanism -- Why Adoption of the Clean 
       Development Mechanism Di.ers Across Countries? -- Clean 
       Development Mechanism as a Cooperation Mechanism -- Why So
       Few Agricultural Projects in the Clean Development 
       Mechanism? -- CONCLUSION AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS -- 
       EPILOGUE -- REFERENCES -- Chapter 2. An Updated Review of 
       Carbon Markets, Institutions, Policies, and Research With 
       Contributions by Philippe Ambrosi and Rebecca Entler -- 
       SCIENCE AND POLICY -- FEATURES OF THE CLIMATE CHANGE 
       FRAMEWORK -- Obligations Under the Framework -- 
       Flexibility Mechanisms -- Emission Allocations and the 
       Choice of Policy Instruments -- Permit systems versus 
       carbon taxes -- Current Instruments -- Project Rules -- 
       The CDM Project Cycle -- The JI Project Cycle -- Land 
       Management Projects -- Supplementarity, Additionality, 
       Diversion, and Carry Over -- Supplementarity -- 
       Additionality and baselines -- Managing tradable units 
       inventories under Kyoto -- Compatibility with the Trade 
       Agreements40 -- EXPECTED OUTCOMES FROM THE CLIMATE CHANGE 
       FRAMEWORK -- Policy Evaluations and Predictions -- Model 
       Structures and Technology -- Market Power -- Leakages, 
       Ancillary Bene.ts, and Crowding Out -- Uncertainty, 
       Discounting, and Intergenerational Tradeoffs -- Technology
       Development and Transfer as a Policy Instrument -- 
       Technology transfer and project financing -- DOMESTIC 
       POLICIES IN THE EUROPEAN UNION, THE US, AND AUSTRALIA 
505 8  EU Emissions Trading Scheme -- Integration with the 
       Climate Change Framework -- Regional Initiatives and 
       Voluntary Markets -- Oregon -- California62 -- 
       Northeastern US -- Chicago Climate Exchange -- Australia -
       - CARBON MARKETS64 -- Model Studies of Potential Size of 
       the Market for the Flexibility Mechanisms -- The Evolution
       of Carbon Project Financing -- Evaluations of mitigation 
       potential and project investment -- The Geographic 
       Distribution of Kyoto-Project Credits -- Balance across 
       asset classes -- Who is buying project credits? -- Markets
       and the pricing of project credits -- CONCLUSIONS AND 
       AREAS FOR FUTURE STUDY -- REFERENCES -- ANNEX 2.1: 
       Glossary of Acronyms. -- Chapter 3. The Activities 
       Implemented Jointly Pilots: A Foundation for Clean 
       Development Mechanism? With Contributions by Gunnar 
       Breustedt -- ORIGINS OF THE AIJ PROGRAM -- RELATED STUDIES
       -- Numeric Studies -- Investment and Agency Approval -- 
       Multilateral and Bilateral Transaction Costs -- A MODEL OF
       PROJECT INVESTMENT -- Conceptual Model -- Applied Model --
       An Alternative Dichotomous Model -- Internalized Agency 
       Preferences and Transaction Costs -- Additional Estimation
       Concerns -- DATA DESCRIPTION -- AIJ Investments -- 
       Variables Affecting Investment Choice -- Variables 
       Affecting Agency Preferences -- EMPIRICAL RESULTS -- 
       Baseline Model Specification -- Project investment -- 
       Agency preferences -- Model specification tests -- 
       Revisiting the Contemporaneous Correlation Assumption -- 
       Epilogue -- CONCLUSION -- REFERENCES -- Chapter 4. The 
       Cost of Mitigation Under the Clean Development Mechanism -
       - ESTIMATING EMISSIONS ABATEMENT COST OF THE CDM -- 
       Background -- The Conceptual Model -- The Applied 
       Emissions Abatement Cost Function -- DATA DESCRIPTION -- 
       Project Abatement Capacity -- Initial Investment, Income 
       from Power Sales, and Maintenance Costs 
505 8  MODEL SPECIFICATION AND ESTIMATION RESULTS -- CONCLUSIONS 
       AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS -- REFERENCES -- ANNEX 4.1. The 
       methodology for calculating (separating) the cost of 
       emissions abatement for the CDM projects that produce 
       tradable outputs -- Chapter 5. Diffusion of Kyoto's Clean 
       Development Mechanism -- TECHNOLOGY DIFFUSION LITERATURE -
       - MITIGATION POTENTIAL, MODEL PREDICTIONS, AND THE CDM 
       PIPELINE -- IS CDM ON TRACK? -- Data Description -- 
       Applied Diffusions Models -- Estimation Results -- SUMMARY
       AND CONCLUSION -- REFERENCES -- Chapter 6. Why Adoption of
       the Clean Development Mechanism Differs Across Countries? 
       -- THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK AND EMPIRICAL MODELS -- The 
       Empirical Models -- Variables and Hypotheses -- DATA AND 
       MEASUREMENTS -- ESTIMATION PROCEDURES -- RESULTS -- Growth
       of CDM in the World and in Individual Countries -- CDM 
       Adoption by the Host Countries -- CDM Adoption by the 
       Investor (Annex B) Countries -- CONCLUSIONS AND POLICY 
       IMPLICATIONS -- REFERENCES -- ANNEX 6.1: Methodology for 
       the Data Collection on the Capital Cost Data From Clean 
       Development Mechanism Project Activity.14 -- Methods in 
       Obtaining Capital Cost Data -- Perspective in Capital Cost
       Data -- Chapter 7. Clean Development Mechanism as a 
       Cooperation Mechanism With Contributions by Philippe 
       Ambrosi -- CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK -- Foreign Direct 
       Investment, Foreign Aid, and International Trade -- 
       Enabling Environment: Governance, Regulations, and 
       Business Climate -- HYPOTHESES -- DATA DESCRIPTION, 
       VARIABLE CONSTRUCTION, AND EMPIRICAL SPECIFICATION -- 
       ESTIMATION PROCEDURES -- DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS RESULTS --
       Dyad-level Descriptive Statistics -- Results for the 
       Cooperation Estimates -- CONCLUSIONS AND POLICY 
       IMPLICATIONS -- REFERENCES -- ANNEXE 7.1 -- Chapter 8. Why
       So Few Agricultural Projects in the Clean Development 
       Mechanism? With Contributions by J. Aapris Frisbie 
505 8  POTENTIAL SOURCES OF MITIGATION IN AGRICULTURE -- 
       AGRICULTURAL AND LAND-USE PROJECTS UNDER THE CDM -- 
       Baseline Methodologies for Agricultural and Land-use 
       Forestry Projects -- PROJECT MARKETS OUTSIDE THE CDM -- 
       HURDLES TO INCLUDING AGRICULTURAL PROJECTS IN THE CDM -- 
       Objections to the CDM and their Influence on Its Design --
       Flexibility Mechanisms -- Creating New Credits -- The 
       development objective and bilateral approval -- Land 
       Management Projects -- Consequences for Pricing and 
       Profitability -- ANCILLARY BENEFITS AND SUSTAINABLE RURAL 
       DEVELOPMENT -- Soil Carbon Sequestration and Productivity 
       -- Carbon Sequestration and Other Environmental Services -
       - PATHS FORWARD -- Modifying the CDM -- Supplemental and 
       Additional Mechanisms for Investing in Land-use Mitigation
       Projects -- CONCLUSIONS -- REFERENCES -- ANNEXE -- Chapter
       9. Conclusion -- AIJ AS A MODEL -- ABATEMENT COSTS VIA CDM
       -- DIFFUSION OF THE CDM -- ADOPTION DETERMINANTS -- CDM AS
       A COOPERATION MECHANISM -- WHY SO FEW AGRICULTURAL 
       PROJECTS? -- THE DEBATE ON CDM PERFORMANCE COMPARED TO ITS
       ORIGINAL OBJECTIVES -- The Mitigation Impact of the CDM --
       Stimulate Capital Flows -- Did the CDM Tap the Lowest Cost
       Abatement Opportunities? -- Technology Transfer -- Promote
       Development -- FINAL REMARKS -- REFERENCES -- Index 
520    Key Features:Comprehensive analysis and global assessment 
       of the CDMAssessment of future sustainability of the CDM 
588    Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other
       sources 
590    Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest 
       Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access 
       may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated 
       libraries 
650  0 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change -- 
       (1992). -- Protocols, etc., -- 1997 Dec. 11.;Sustainable 
       development.;Climatic changes -- Prevention 
655  4 Electronic books 
700 1  Larson, Donald F 
700 1  Rahman, Shaikh Mahfuzur 
776 08 |iPrint version:|aDinar, Ariel|tThe Clean Development 
       Mechanism (CDM) : An Early History of Unanticipated 
       Outcomes|dSingapore : World Scientific Publishing Co Pte 
       Ltd,c2013|z9789814401098 
830  0 World Scientific Series on the Economics of Climate Change
       Ser 
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