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作者 Gómez Herrero, Gonzalo
書名 Network Mergers and Migrations : Junos Design and Implementation
出版項 New York : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2010
©2011
國際標準書號 9780470660171 (electronic bk.)
9780470660164
book jacket
版本 2nd ed
說明 1 online resource (568 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
系列 Wiley Series on Communications Networking and Distributed Systems Ser. ; v.45
Wiley Series on Communications Networking and Distributed Systems Ser
附註 Intro -- Contents -- List of Junos Tips -- List of Application Notes -- List of "What ifs" -- About the Authors -- Series Foreword -- Foreword -- Acknowledgments -- Acronyms -- Introduction -- 1 Dealing with Routes within a Junos OS Based Router -- 1.1 Route Handling Features inside a Junos OS Based Router -- 1.1.1 Instances and RIB tables -- 1.1.2 Grouping RIBs together -- 1.1.3 Instructing protocols to use different RIBs -- 1.1.4 Automatic RIB groups and VPN routes -- 1.1.5 Local redistribution using the vrf-import option -- 1.2 RIB Route Advertisement at MPLS Layer 3 VPNs -- 1.2.1 Levels of advertisement policy - vpn-apply-export -- 1.2.2 Path selection mode in Junos OS -- 1.2.3 RIB group versus auto-exported routes -- 1.2.4 RIB selection - no-vrf-advertise -- 1.3 Directing Traffic to Forwarding Tables -- 1.3.1 Adding a routing table next hop to a static route -- 1.3.2 Using packet fil tering to control the forwarding process -- 1.3.3 Usage guidelines -- 1.3.4 Risks of decoupling routing and forwarding -- 1.4 Case Study -- 1.4.1 Original network -- 1.4.2 Target network -- 1.4.3 Migration strategy -- 1.4.4 Stage one: Building an MPLS L3VPN -- 1.4.5 Stage two: Preparatory work at spoke sites -- 1.4.6 Stage three: Preparatory work at headquarters -- 1.4.7 Stage four: Preparatory work at the data center -- 1.4.8 Stage five: Move of data center site to CORP VRF -- 1.4.9 Stage six: Moving first spoke site router Inverness to CORP VRF -- 1.4.10 Stage seven: Monitoring and anomaly detection -- 1.4.11 Stage eight: Move of remaining spoke sites to CORP VRF -- 1.4.12 Stage nine: Hub traffic to data center to follow CORP VPN -- 1.4.13 Stage ten: Migration cleanup -- 1.4.14 Migration summary -- Bibliography -- Further Reading -- 2 Link-State IGP Migrations -- 2.1 Link-state IGP Hierarchical Migrations
2.1.1 Motivations for link-state IGP hierarchical migrations -- 2.1.2 Generic strategies for link-state IGP hierarchical migrations -- 2.1.3 Resources for link-state IGP hierarchical migrations -- 2.2 Link-state IGP Domain Migrations -- 2.2.1 Considerations for a link-state IGP migration -- 2.2.2 Generic strategies for a link-state IGP migration -- 2.2.3 Resources for a link-state IGP migration -- 2.3 Case Study -- 2.3.1 Original network -- 2.3.2 Target network -- 2.3.3 Migration strategy -- 2.3.4 Stage one: IS-IS Level 2 activation in domain "Cyclone" -- 2.3.5 Stage two: Route redistribution at domain "Monsoon" -- 2.3.6 Stage three: IS-IS protocol adaption at domain "Mistral" -- 2.3.7 Stage four: Domain interconnection via IS-IS Level 2 -- 2.3.8 Stage five: Integration of router Lille in the IS-IS domain -- 2.3.9 Stage six: Global connectivity verification -- 2.3.10 Stage seven: OSPFv2 to IS-IS Level 2 transition in domain "Cyclone" -- 2.3.11 Stage eight: Address renumbering and OSPFv2 replacement with IS-IS in domain "Monsoon" -- 2.3.12 Stage nine: IS-IS Level 1 authentication and route-leaking adaption in domain "Mistral" and router Lille -- 2.3.13 Migration summary -- Bibliography -- Further Reading -- 3 BGP Migrations -- 3.1 Motivations for BGP Migrations -- 3.2 Considerations for BGP Migrations -- 3.2.1 Protocol messages -- 3.2.2 Capability advertisement -- 3.2.3 Address families -- 3.2.4 Implications of public AS change -- 3.2.5 AS numbers in route advertisements -- 3.2.6 AS-related attributes in advertisements -- 3.2.7 Internal peering topologies -- 3.2.8 Keep last active route with BGP equal cost external paths -- 3.2.9 Grouping policy with communities -- 3.2.10 Handling of protocol next-hop changes -- 3.3 Generic Strategies for BGP Migrations -- 3.3.1 Leverage protocol layering -- 3.3.2 Adding redundancy -- 3.3.3 Scalability
3.3.4 Beware of IP routers in transit -- 3.3.5 Coordinating external peering changes -- 3.3.6 Best-path selection -- 3.3.7 Changing IBGP topologies -- 3.4 Junos OS Implementation of BGP -- 3.4.1 Inbound -- 3.4.2 Adj-RIB-In -- 3.4.3 Loc-RIB -- 3.4.4 Adj-RIB-Out -- 3.5 Resources for Junos OS BGP Migrations -- 3.5.1 Advertisement of inactive BGP routes -- 3.5.2 Flexible identification of the local AS -- 3.5.3 Allowing for AS loops -- 3.6 Case Study -- 3.6.1 Original network -- 3.6.2 Target network -- 3.6.3 Migration strategy -- 3.6.4 Stage one: Confederating domain "Cyclone" -- 3.6.5 Stage two: Confederating domain "Mistral" -- 3.6.6 Stage three: First confederation peering to bind both sub-AS domains together -- 3.6.7 Stage four: Monitoring period -- 3.6.8 Stage five: CBGP deployment and EBGP cleanup between domain "Cyclone" and domain "Mistral" -- 3.6.9 Stage six: External peering on new 4-byte AS -- 3.6.10 Stage seven: Bringup IBGP peerings to Lille -- 3.6.11 Stage eight: Enable route reflection on router Lille -- 3.6.12 Stage nine: Switch router Nantes to the 4-byte AS -- 3.6.13 Stage ten: Monitor -- 3.6.14 Stage eleven: Roll out and cleanup -- 3.6.15 Migration summary -- Bibliography -- Further Reading -- 4 MPLS label distribution Migrations -- 4.1 Motivations for MPLS label distribution Migrations -- 4.2 Considerations for MPLS label distribution Migrations -- 4.3 Generic Strategies for an MPLS label distribution protocol Migration -- 4.3.1 MPLS label distribution protocol coexistence -- 4.3.2 MPLS label distribution protocol redistribution -- 4.3.3 MPLS label distribution protocol overlay -- 4.3.4 MPLS label distribution protocol parameterization -- 4.4 Resources for an MPLS label distribution protocol Migration -- 4.4.1 MPLS label distribution protocol preference -- 4.4.2 Resources to control LDP label distribution
4.4.3 Resources for route installation with RSVP-TE -- 4.4.4 Resources for label advertisement and route resolution with Labeled BGP -- 4.5 Case Study -- 4.5.1 Original network -- 4.5.2 Target network -- 4.5.3 Migration strategy -- 4.5.4 Stage one: Labeled BGP deployment over LDP in domain "Mistral" -- 4.5.5 Stage two: Labeled BGP deployment over RSVP-TE in domain "Cyclone" -- 4.5.6 Stage three: Labeled BGP interconnect between domain "Cyclone" and domain "Mistral" -- 4.5.7 Stage four: Redundant label binding distribution over domain "Monsoon" -- 4.5.8 Stage five: MPLS integration and interconnect via router Lille -- 4.5.9 Stage six: LDP activation in all domains -- 4.5.10 Migration summary -- Bibliography -- Further Reading -- 5 MPLS Layer 3 VPN Migrations -- 5.1 Motivations for Layer 3 VPN Migrations -- 5.1.1 Security enforcement -- 5.1.2 Communication flow handling -- 5.1.3 Service multiplexing -- 5.1.4 Route manipulation -- 5.1.5 Routing redundancy -- 5.2 Considerations for Layer 3 VPN Migrations -- 5.2.1 Layer 3 VPNs -- 5.2.2 RIP as PE-CE protocol -- 5.2.3 OSPFv2 as PE-CE protocol -- 5.2.4 EBGP as PE-CE protocol -- 5.2.5 IBGP as PE-CE protocol -- 5.2.6 Inter-AS options -- 5.2.7 Carrier Supporting Carrier (CsC) -- 5.3 Generic Strategies for L3VPN Migrations -- 5.3.1 Layer VPN Route Target mapping -- 5.3.2 Layer 3 VPN Route Distinguiser mapping -- 5.3.3 Parallel L3VPNs -- 5.3.4 Interconnecting L3VPNs -- 5.4 Junos Implementation of L3VPNs -- 5.4.1 MPLS label allocation for L3VPNs -- 5.5 Resources for L3VPN Migrations -- 5.5.1 RIP PE-CE resources -- 5.5.2 OSPFv2 PE-CE resources -- 5.5.3 BGP PE-CE resources -- 5.6 Case Study -- 5.6.1 Original network -- 5.6.2 Target network -- 5.6.3 Migration strategy -- 5.6.4 Stage one: Inter-AS Option A deployment -- 5.6.5 Stage two: Inter-AS Option B deployment -- 5.6.6 Stage three: Inter-AS Option B activation
5.6.7 Stage four: Bringup of redundant Option B over CsC -- 5.6.8 Stage five: Activation of Option B over CsC -- 5.6.9 Stage Six: Inter-AS Option C deployment in domain "Cyclone" -- 5.6.10 Stage Seven: Inter-AS Option C activation -- 5.6.11 Stage Eight: Build redundant Option C -- 5.6.12 Stage Nine: Activation of redundant Option C -- 5.6.13 Migration summary -- Bibliography -- Further Reading -- Index
This book provides you with guidelines to plan, design, roll out, and accomplish network migration activities with a variety of internetworking case studies. It considers both enterprise and service provider scenarios based on the expertise from Juniper Networks engineers. From Metro Ethernet migration approaches to comprehensive network protocol consolidation and integration, each case study covers JUNOS resources to ensure successful completion at each migration phase. In addition to an appendix of automation scripts and examples and guidelines for each step, the book also describes the modern challenges that evolve in IT networks
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
鏈接 Print version: Gómez Herrero, Gonzalo Network Mergers and Migrations : Junos Design and Implementation New York : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated,c2010 9780470660164
主題 Juniper Networks, Inc.;Computer networks.;Computer system conversion.;Systems migration
Electronic books
Alt Author Bernal van der Ven, Jan Antón
van der Ven, Jan Antón Bernal
Bernal Van Der Ven, Jan Anton
Gó Mez Herrero, Gonzalo
G?mez Herrero, Gonzalo
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