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作者 Crown, Kathleen M
書名 Do interactions between mentors and mentees decrease levels of new teacher attrition?
國際標準書號 9780549960553
book jacket
說明 125 p
附註 Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 69-12, Section: A, page: 4689
Adviser: Aaron Givan
Thesis (Ed.D.)--Northcentral University, 2009
The researcher studied the amount and type of mentoring new teachers receive in New York State versus new teacher attrition rates. Mentoring has been found to reduce new teacher attrition rates but the amount and type of mentoring most effective in reducing those rates has yet to be determined. The purpose of this study was to determine what the optimal amount and type of mentoring was needed per week to reduce new teacher attrition and to answer the following research questions: (a) Does increasing interactions between mentors and mentees from one hour per week to three or more hours per week significantly decrease levels of new teacher attrition? (b) Do the interactions associated with peer review between mentors and mentees significantly decrease levels of new teacher attrition? and (c) Does psychological support interactions between mentors and mentees significantly decrease levels of new teacher attrition? Fifty school district superintendents completed an 11-item questionnaire regarding the amount of mentoring a new teacher received and the type of mentoring a new teacher received. The overall attrition rate for this study was 7.22%. New teachers who had approximately 1 hour of mentoring per week had a new teacher attrition rate of 11.37%. New teachers who received 2 hours per week had a new teacher attrition rate of 4.83%. New teachers who received 3 hours per week had a new teacher attrition rate of 3.60%. When the results of a paired t-test were compared for 1 hour of mentoring per week to 3 hours of mentoring per week, statistical significance was found. New teacher attrition rates were also significantly reduced when the amount of mentoring a new teacher received was increased from 1 hour to 2 hours per week. Psychological support measured the lowest new teacher attrition rate at 3.49% versus peer review which had a new teacher attrition rate of 6.93%, but the difference was not found to be statistically significant using ANOVA. Implications from this research are decreased costs to school districts based upon the use of the psychological support model for mentoring instead of the much costlier peer review model. The psychological support model can occur after the school day without the need for substitute teachers, which are an integral aspect of the peer review model. Decreased new teacher attrition rates occurred when mentoring was provided 2 or 3 hours per week instead of 1 hour per week. This increase in time could occur during teacher preparation periods and after school and should not create an increase in school district costs for a mentoring program that effectively reduces new teacher attrition rates
School code: 1443
Host Item Dissertation Abstracts International 69-12A
主題 Education, Administration
Education, Teacher Training
0514
0530
Alt Author Northcentral University
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