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020    9780080922096|q(electronic bk.) 
020    |z9780123743879 
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035    (Au-PeEL)EBL629997 
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050  4 RC628.O24 2010 
082 0  362.196398 
100 1  Dube, Laurette 
245 10 Obesity Prevention :|bThe Role of Brain and Society on 
       Individual Behavior 
264  1 San Diego :|bElsevier Science & Technology,|c2010 
264  4 |c©2010 
300    1 online resource (832 pages) 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    computer|bc|2rdamedia 
338    online resource|bcr|2rdacarrier 
505 0  Front Cover -- Obesity Prevention: The Role of Brain and 
       Society on Individual Behavior -- Copyright Page -- 
       Contents -- List of contributors -- Preface -- 
       Acknowledgments -- Introduction: On the Brain-to-Society 
       Model of Motivated Choice and the Whole-of-Society 
       Approach to Obesity Prevention -- Part 1. FROM BRAIN TO 
       BEHAVIOR -- A. Energy is Delight: Sensory and Reward 
       Systems -- Chapter 1 The Pleasures and Pains of Brain 
       Regulatory Systems for Eating -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 
       Satiety Agents versus Aversion-Inducing Agents -- 1.3 
       Various Methodologies to Evaluate Affective Change in Pre-
       Clinical Appetite Research -- 1.4 Conditioned Taste 
       Aversions - From Animal Models to Human Brain Analysis? --
       1.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 2 The Neurobiology
       of Appetite: Hunger as Addiction -- 2.1 Introduction -- 
       2.2 Hunger as Addiction -- 2.3 Response to Conditioned 
       Cues -- 2.4 Functional Brain Imaging of Cue Reactivity -- 
       2.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 3 Opioids: 
       Culprits for Overconsumption of Palatable Foods? -- 3.1 
       Introduction -- 3.2 Opioids and Feeding Behavior in Rodent
       Models -- 3.3 Opioids and Dysregulation of Eating Patterns
       and Body Weight in Human Beings -- 3.4 Conclusions and 
       Perspectives -- References -- Chapter 4 Taste, Olfactory 
       and Food-texture Processing in the Brain and the Control 
       of Appetite -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Taste-Processing in
       the Primate Brain -- 4.3 The Representation of Flavor: 
       Convergence of Olfactory, Taste and Visual Inputs in the 
       Orbitofrontal Cortex -- 4.4 The Texture of Food, Including
       Fat Texture -- 4.5 Imaging Studies in Humans -- 4.6 
       Cognitive Effects on Representations of Food -- 4.7 
       Synthesis -- 4.8 Implications for Understanding, 
       Preventing, and Treating Obesity -- 4.9 Concluding Remarks
       -- References -- Chapter 5 Cortical and Limbic Activation 
       in Response to Low- and High-calorie Food 
505 8  5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Brain Responses to Food Stimuli in
       Healthy Adults -- 5.3 Modulating Factors -- 5.4 Cortical 
       and Limbic Activation to Food Images During Adolescent 
       Development -- 5.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter 6 
       Reward-related Neuroadaptations Induced by Food 
       Restriction: Pathogenic Potential of a Survival Mechanism 
       -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Food Restriction may Augment 
       Neurobiological Responses to Palatable Food in a Way that 
       Promotes Addictive Behavior -- 6.3 Food Restriction 
       Enhances CNS and Behavioral Responses to Drugs of Abuse 
       and Dopamine Receptor Agonists -- 6.4 Food Restriction Up-
       regulates D1 Dopamine Receptor-Mediated Phosphorylation of
       Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors and Signaling Proteins that
       Underlie Synaptic Plasticity -- 6.5 Striatal 
       Neuroadaptations Induced by Food Restriction may be 
       Secondary to Changes in Pre-synaptic Dopamine Neuronal 
       Function -- 6.6 A Schema to Consider as Research Continues
       -- References -- B. Executive Control Systems and the 
       Challenges They Face in the Modern World of Plenty -- 
       Chapter 7 The Neuroeconomics of Food Selection and 
       Purchase -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Positive Valuations --
       7.3 Influences on Positive Valuations -- 7.4 Negative 
       Valuations -- 7.5 Influences on Negative Valuations -- 7.6
       Selection -- 7.7 Habits -- 7.8 Conclusions -- References -
       - Chapter 8 Resisting Temptation: Impulse Control and 
       Trade-offs between Immediate Rewards and Long-term 
       Consequences -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 A Neural System 
       for Decision-Making and Will-power: The Somatic Marker 
       Hypothesis -- 8.3 Empirical Evidence for Deficits of 
       Decision-making Underlying Obesity -- 8.4 Conclusion -- 
       References -- Chapter 9 Hunger, Satiety, and Food 
       Preferences: Effects of the Brain and the Body on the Self
       -Control of Eating -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 The 
       Components of Self-control 
505 8  9.3 Physiological Influences on Self-control -- 9.4 
       Promoting Self-control for a Healthy Body Weight -- 9.5 
       Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 10 Associative 
       Learning and the Control of Food Intake -- 10.1 A 
       Behavioral Reporting of Eating -- 10.2 Eating is a Learned
       Behavior -- 10.3 Forms of Learned Ingestive Response -- 
       10.4 Sensory-specific Anticipatory Eating -- 10.5 Diurnal 
       Rhythms and the Learned Response -- 10.6 Nutrients and 
       Cognition -- 10.7 Dietary Fats and Learning -- 10.8 Our 
       Primitive Brain -- References -- Chapter 11 Restrained 
       Eating in a World of Plenty -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 
       The Effects of Having Food Cues Present -- 11.3 Response 
       to Food Cues in Restrained and Unrestrained Eaters -- 11.4
       Food Photographs and/or Words - Indirect Food Cues -- 11.5
       Portion Size as Food Cue -- 11.6 The Removal of Food Cues 
       -- 11.7 Caloric Restriction in Animals and Humans -- 11.8 
       Is CR Likely to be Effective for Humans? -- 11.9 Caloric 
       Restriction in the Presence of Food Cues -- 11.10 Dieting 
       in a World of Food Cues -- References -- C. Biological 
       Systems that Favor a Positive Energy Balance and Body-
       weight Increase in a World of Plenty -- Chapter 12 The 
       Genetic Determinants of Ingestive Behavior: Sensory, 
       Energy Homeostasis and Food Reward Aspects of Ingestive 
       Behavior -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Sensory Determinants
       of Food Intake -- 12.3 Energy Homeostasis Pathways and 
       Food Intake -- 12.4 Reward Circuits and Food Intake -- 
       12.5 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter 13 Development 
       of Human Learned Flavor Likes and Dislikes -- 13.1 
       Introduction -- 13.2 Understanding Flavor Perception -- 
       13.3 Why Innate Flavor-liking is Rare -- 13.4 Flavor-
       preference Learning -- 13.5 Different Learning Mechanisms 
       Interact to Enhance Flavor-liking -- 13.6 Liking and 
       Intake: The Role of Palatability in Overeating -- 13.7 
       Acquired Liking as a Driver of Overeating 
505 8  13.8 Individual Differences in Learning -- 13.9 Summary --
       References -- Chapter 14 Biopsychological Factors and Body
       -weight Stability -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Is 
       Knowledge-based Work a Potential Determinant of the 
       Current Obesity Epidemic? -- 14.3 Is Short Sleep Duration 
       a Potential Determinant of the Current Obesity Epidemic? -
       - 14.4 Weight Loss: Not Always Beneficial for the 
       Psychological Health -- 14.5 Physical Activity and Diet: 
       What is the Impact on Body-weight Stability? -- 14.6 
       Conclusion and Perspectives -- References -- Chapter 15 
       Nutrition, Epigenomics and the Development of Obesity: How
       the Genome Learns from Experience -- 15.1 The Basics of 
       Epigenetics and Epigenomics -- 15.2 Epigenetic Marks 
       During Development and Aging -- 15.3 Nutritional 
       Epigenomics -- 15.4 Epigenetics and Brain Function -- 15.5
       An Epigenetic Basis for Developmental Programming of 
       Obesity? -- 15.6 Physical Activity, Epigenetic Markings 
       and Obesity -- 15.7 Concluding Comments -- References -- 
       Chapter 16 The Role of Early Life Experiences in Flavor 
       Perception and Delight -- 16.1 Introduction -- 16.2 Flavor
       and the Ontogeny of the Senses -- 16.3 Taste and 
       Development -- 16.4 Learning about Food Flavors -- 16.5 
       Concluding Remarks -- References -- Chapter 17 
       Implications of the Glycemic Index in Obesity -- 17.1 
       Introduction -- 17.2 The concept of the Glycemic Index -- 
       17.3 Mechanisms of Action -- 17.4 Effects of low GI Foods 
       on Appetite, Food Intake and Satiety -- 17.5 GI and 
       Obesity -- 17.6 GI and Diabetes -- 17.7 GI and 
       Cardiovascular Disease -- 17.8 Conclusion -- References --
       Chapter 18 Characterizing the Homeostatic and Hedonic 
       Markers of the Susceptible Phenotype -- 18.1 The Approach 
       -- 18.2 Susceptible and Resistant Phenotypes -- 18.3 What 
       Would a Susceptible Phenotype Look Like? -- 18.4 What 
       Level of Analysis is Appropriate? 
505 8  18.5 Appetite is Not Rocket Science - It is More 
       Complicated -- 18.6 Diversity, Susceptibility and 
       Homeostasis -- 18.7 Hedonics: The Importance of Liking and
       Wanting -- 18.8 Comparing Susceptible and Resistant 
       Phenotypes -- 18.9 Resistance to Weight Loss - The Other 
       Side of Susceptibility -- 18.10 Conclusions -- References 
       -- Chapter 19 The Carnivore Connection: Cross-population 
       Differences in the Prevalence of Genes Producing Insulin 
       Resistance -- 19.1 Background -- 19.2 The Evolution of 
       Insulin Resistance -- 19.3 Determinants of Insulin 
       Resistance -- 19.4 Candidate Genes and Cross-population 
       Genetic Differences -- 19.5 Conclusion -- References -- 
       Chapter 20 Neuroanatomical Correlates of Hunger and 
       Satiaty in Lean and Obese Individuals -- 20.1 Physiology 
       of Hunger and Satiety in Human Eating Behavior -- 20.2 
       Functional Neuroimaging Evidence -- References -- Chapter 
       21 Neuroendocrine Stress Response and Its Impact on Eating
       Behavior and Body Weight -- 21.1 Introduction -- 21.2 
       Hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal Axis -- 21.3 Stress and Food
       Intake: It is Not all Homeostatic or Automatic -- 21.4 
       Imaging Studies in Humans -- 21.5 Peripheral Signals 
       Regulating Energy Balance -- 21.6 Conclusion -- References
       -- D. Integrative and Multi-level Models of Eating and of 
       Energy and Body-weight Regulation -- Chapter 22 Eating 
       Behavior and its Determinants: From Gene to Environment --
       22.1 Introduction -- 22.2 Genes -- 22.3 The Environment --
       22.4 Genes - Environment Interactions -- 22.5 A General 
       Model of Intake Regulation -- 22.6 Discussion -- 
       References -- Chapter 23 The Molecular Regulation of Body 
       Weight: The Role of Leptin, Ghrelin and Hypocretin -- 23.1
       Introduction -- 23.2 Leptin, Ghrelin and Hypocretin -- 
       23.3 Leptin Protein -- 23.4 Ghrelin Protein -- 23.5 
       Hypocretin Protein -- 23.6 Concluding Remarks -- 
       References 
505 8  Chapter 24 Energy Balance Regulation: Complex Interplay 
       between the Autonomic and Cognitive/Limbic Brains to 
       Control Food Intake and Thermogenesis 
520    Over the years, approaches to obesity prevention and 
       treatment have gone from focusing on genetic and other 
       biological factors to exploring a diversity of diets and 
       individual behavior modification interventions anchored 
       primarily in the power of the mind, to the recent shift 
       focusing on societal interventions to design "temptation-
       proof" physical, social, and economic environments. In 
       spite of repeated calls to action, including those of the 
       World Health Organization (WHO), the pandemic continues to
       progress. WHO recently projected that if the current 
       lifestyle trend in young and adult populations around the 
       world persist, by 2012 in countries like the USA, health 
       care costs may amount to as much as 17.7% of the GDP. Most
       importantly, in large part due to the problems of obesity,
       those children may be the first generation ever to have a 
       shorter life expectancy than that of their parents. This 
       work presents the most current research and proposals for 
       addressing the pandemic. Past studies have focused 
       primarly on either genetic or behavioral causes for 
       obesity, however today's research indicates that a 
       strongly integrated program is the best prospect for 
       success in overcoming obesity. Furthermore, focus on the 
       role of society in establishing an affordable, accessible 
       and sustainable program for implementing these lifestyle 
       changes is vital, particularly for those in economically 
       challenged situations, who are ultimately at the highest 
       risk for obesity. Using studies from both neuroscience and
       behavioral science to present a comprehensive overview of 
       the challenges and possible solutions, The brain-to-
       society approach to obesity prevention focuses on what is 
       needed in order to sustain a healthy, pleasurable and 
       affordable lifestyle. * Explores the "brain-to-society" 
       approach to obesity prevention, focusing on an integrative
       approach to addressing 
520 8  the obesity pandemic * Presents both the nueroscientific 
       and the behavioral factors that impact eating habits * 
       Identifies the challenges and suggests solutions for 
       altering attitudes toward food on both an individual and a
       societal level 
588    Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other
       sources 
590    Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest 
       Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access 
       may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated 
       libraries 
650  0 Obesity -- Prevention.;Nutrition 
655  4 Electronic books 
700 1  Drewnowski, Adam 
700 1  James, Philip 
700 1  LeBel, Jordan 
700 1  Yada, Rickey Y 
700 1  Bechara, Antoine 
700 1  Dagher, Alain 
700 1  Yada, Rickey Y 
776 08 |iPrint version:|aDube, Laurette|tObesity Prevention : The
       Role of Brain and Society on Individual Behavior|dSan 
       Diego : Elsevier Science & Technology,c2010|z9780123743879
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