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作者 Fehringer, Jessica Anne
書名 Understanding intimate partner violence and marital power in Cebu, Philippines
國際標準書號 9781109777727
book jacket
說明 237 p
附註 Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 71-05, Section: B, page: 2998
Adviser: Michelle J. Hindin
Thesis (Ph.D.)--The Johns Hopkins University, 2010
Background. Intimate partner violence is a significant problem faced by men and women around the world. Our understanding of intimate partner violence, particularly for female perpetrated IPV, is limited in developing country contexts. Motivations for and changes in female and male IPV perpetration over time have also been understudied in such settings. Marital power has been increasingly recognized as influencing IPV. Findings on the relation between marital power and IPV, however, are inconsistent
Objectives. The objectives of this study were: (1) to examine the relation between marital power and female IPV perpetration and victimization; (2) to examine the relation between marital power and male IPV perpetration and victimization: and (3) to describe the context of, motivations for, and changes over time in female IPV perpetration and victimization
Methods. This study used secondary data from 1690 married women and their 1571 husbands in Cebu. Philippines. It also used qualitative data from interviews with 18 married women in Cebu. The analyses included women who completed the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey (CLHNS) in both 2002 and 2005: husbands who completed the 2005 CLHNS: and women who completed the 2005 CLHNS and in-depth interviews in 2009
Results. There were three categories of IPV motivations--self-defense or retaliation, reactivity, and control. Motivations differed by gender, with women acting out of self-defense more often and men acting out of control more often. Men used several more severe forms of IPV. Decreases in IPV over time were related to women minimizing situations sparking violence or to emotional maturation of the couple
In the analyses that examined factors related to recurrent IPV, greater joint decision-making was associated with a lower relative risk of recurrent male, recurrent female, and 2002-only female 1PV perpetration. The husband working while the wife was not working was associated with a higher risk of female and reciprocal IPV perpetration; the wife working and the husband not working was associated with a higher risk of female IPV perpetration. Women's relative contribution to household income was positively associated with male 2005-only IPV perpetration, female 2002-only IPV perpetration, and male recurrent IPV perpetration--only male recurrent IPV perpetration was associated with multiple levels of women's income contribution
In the analyses that examined male IPV perpetration and/or victimization, having a mother with a lower economic status than that of the wife's mother was associated with female IPV perpetration while having a mother with education lower than that of the wife's mother was associated with male and reciprocal IPV perpetration. Women's relative contribution to household income was positively associated with reciprocal IPV
Conclusions. Male IPV perpetration is more often control-oriented and involves more serious types of violence. Also, marital power is an important factor in both male and female IPV perpetration in the Philippines but with key differences in how marital power relates to each type of perpetration. Effective IPV prevention and treatment programs should take these gender differences into consideration. Moreover, it is important to look at how IPV occurs within relationships and how this may vary by context, time, and gender
School code: 0098
Host Item Dissertation Abstracts International 71-05B
主題 Health Sciences, Public Health
Sociology, Individual and Family Studies
0573
0628
Alt Author The Johns Hopkins University
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