MARC 主機 00000nam  2200373   4500 
001    AAI3451422 
005    20121112123514.5 
008    121112s2010    ||||||||||||||||| ||eng d 
020    9781124566962 
035    (UMI)AAI3451422 
040    UMI|cUMI 
100 1  Hall, Russell 
245 10 Risk and resilience in ostracized passive adolescents: 
       Findings and implications 
300    137 p 
500    Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 72-
       06, Section: B, page: 3755 
500    Adviser: Sherry Rostosky 
502    Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Kentucky, 2010 
520    The purpose of this study was to examine unique behavioral,
       social and psychological factors associated with risk and 
       resilience in ostracized passive adolescents. Self-report 
       and peer report data was drawn from a sample of 855 ninth 
       grade students from three high schools. Self-report 
       experiences of social ostracism and peer report 
       observations of passive, withdrawn behavior were used to 
       identify ostracized passive behaviors. Cluster analysis 
       was used to define discreet social groups and compared 
       ostracized passive adolescents, socially disruptive 
       adolescents and socially adjusted adolescents along 
       adaptive and maladjusted behaviors 
520    MANOVA results indicated ostracized passive adolescents 
       were rated by peers as less helpful compared to socially 
       adjusted adolescents and socially disruptive adolescents. 
       Ostracized passive adolescents were perceived to exhibit 
       less leadership behaviors compared to socially adjusted 
       adolescents, but not less than socially disruptive 
       adolescents. Ostracized passive adolescents were perceived
       to be less happy, more "picked on" by others, and more 
       excluded by others compared to socially adjusted 
       adolescents and socially disruptive adolescents. Results 
       also indicated ostracized passive adolescents reported 
       lower family satisfaction, lower school engagement, and 
       higher depression and anxiety than socially adjusted 
       adolescents and socially disruptive adolescents 
520    Regression analyses revealed that being female and 
       reporting higher levels of ostracized passivity were 
       associated with higher levels of internalizing behaviors. 
       Sex, however, did not moderate the association between 
       ostracized passivity and internalizing behaviors. Family 
       satisfaction and school belonging partially mediated the 
       relationship between ostracized passivity and 
       internalizing behaviors such that the association between 
       ostracized-passivity and internalizing behaviors was 
       significantly reduced as family satisfaction and school 
       belonging increased 
520    Findings suggest ostracized passivity is associated with 
       psychological symptoms that may possibly interfere with 
       social and academic success during the adolescent 
       developmental period. However, recognizing and 
       strengthening family and school connections has the 
       potential to improve functioning and psychological health.
       Implications for intervention strategies such as 
       developing programs that target increasing adaptive social
       and cognitive skills, expanding peer networks, and 
       promoting positive social connections outside of school 
       are discussed 
520    KEYWORDS: Ostracism, Adolescents, Passive Behaviors, 
       Internalizing Behaviors 
590    School code: 0102 
650  4 Education, Educational Psychology 
650  4 Psychology, Counseling 
690    0525 
690    0603 
710 2  University of Kentucky 
773 0  |tDissertation Abstracts International|g72-06B 
856 40 |uhttp://pqdd.sinica.edu.tw/twdaoapp/servlet/
       advanced?query=3451422