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作者 Muller, Eve
書名 Verbal marking of affect during spontaneous interactions between children with Asperger syndrome and high-functioning autism and their families
國際標準書號 0496080970
book jacket
說明 248 p
附註 Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 65-09, Section: A, page: 3336
Chairs: Claire Kramsch; Adriana Schuler
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of California, Berkeley with San Francisco State University, 2004
Although numerous experimental studies show that children with autism possess significant affective impairments, little is known about how autistic children engage in the spontaneous verbal expression of emotion within natural settings and with familiar interlocutors. The purpose of this study was to describe the affective evaluation behaviors of children with Asperger Syndrome (AS) and high functioning autism (HFA) using data from spontaneous interactions between focus participants and families, as well as comparison children and families. The study addressed the following five questions: (1) Do affective evaluation behaviors of children with AS and HFA differ from those of typically developing children? (2) Does a relationship exist between AS and HFA children's performance on theory of mind tasks and their affective evaluation behaviors? (3) Do families of AS and HFA children engage in different frequencies and/or types of affective evaluation than families of typically developing children? (4) Does a positive relationship exist between children with AS and HFA's affective evaluation behaviors and their families' affective evaluation behaviors? And (5) How do families use affective evaluation sequences to socialize the affective responses of children with AS and HFA? Using a combination of quantitative and qualitative methodologies, the affect marking behaviors of AS and HFA children, typically developing children, and families of both groups were analyzed in terms of the following variables: (1) frequency of affect marking behavior, (2) range of affect markers used, (3) frequency of initiations, (4) use of affect labels and explanations, (5) attribution of affective responses, and (6) sharing of positive and negative affect. Children with AS and HFA differed significantly from typically developing children in a number of striking ways---engaging in more frequent and complex evaluation behaviors than typically developing children. Families of children with AS and HFA were also found to engage in more frequent and complex affect marking behaviors than families of typically developing children, and correlational analyses indicated a positive relationship between how families engaged in affective evaluation and how children with AS and HFA engaged in affective evaluation. No significant differences were found between the affect marking behaviors of children with AS and HFA who passed and those who failed theory of mind tests. Careful analysis of select passages found that parents of children with AS and HFA frequently used affective evaluation sequences as a means of socializing their children's understanding and expression of affect---including managing negative affective responses, encouraging positive affective responses, developing a framework and lexicon for talking about emotion, and encouraging greater sensitivity to and awareness of others' affective responses
School code: 0515
DDC
Host Item Dissertation Abstracts International 65-09A
主題 Psychology, Developmental
Education, Special
0620
0529
Alt Author University of California, Berkeley with San Francisco State University
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