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作者 Mandle, Jon
書名 Companion to Rawls
出版項 Oxford : Wiley, 2013
©2014
國際標準書號 9781118328439 (electronic bk.)
9781444337105
book jacket
版本 1st ed
說明 1 online resource (601 pages)
text txt rdacontent
computer c rdamedia
online resource cr rdacarrier
系列 Blackwell Companions to Philosophy
Blackwell Companions to Philosophy
附註 Cover -- Blackwell Companions to Philosophy -- Title page -- Copyright page -- Contents -- Notes on Contributors -- Introduction -- Part I: Ambitions -- 1: From Philosophical Theology to Democratic Theory: Early Postcards from an Intellectual Journey -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Philosophical Theology of the Undergraduate Thesis -- 3. Ethics as Science -- 4. From Ethics as Science to Moral Philosophy -- 5. From Moral Philosophy to Democratic Theory -- 2: Does Justice as Fairness Have a Religious Aspect? -- 1. What Does Rawls Think Gives a View a Religious Aspect? -- 2. Moral Philosophy and the Religious Temperament -- 3. What Gives Kant's View a Religious Aspect? -- 4. Justice as Fairness Has a Religious Aspect -- 5. Does Political Liberalism Have a Religious Aspect? -- Part II: Method -- 3: Constructivism as Rhetoric -- On What Metaethics Is -- The Trajectory of Rawls's Thought -- The Moral Point of Reflective Equilibrium -- Whither Constructivism? -- Morality as Metaethics -- Reasoning and the Moral Life -- 4: Kantian Constructivism -- 1. The Received History of the Dewey Lectures -- 2. Constructivism before the Dewey Lectures -- 3. Constructivism in the Dewey Lectures -- 4. Constructivism after the Dewey Lectures -- 5: The Basic Structure of Society as the Primary Subject of Justice -- 1. The Primacy of the Basic Structure - What It Means -- 2. The Social Nature of Human Relationships and the Profound Influence of Basic Social Institutions -- 3. The Basic Structure and the Ideals of Persons and Society -- 4. Distributive Justice and the Importance of Background Justice -- 5. Clarifications, Objections, and Responses -- 5.1 Monism vs Dualism -- 5.2 Capitalism, Incentives and the Institutional Division of Labor -- 5.3 Rawls's Principles of Justice Are Neither Consequentialist Nor Prioritarian -- 5.4 Social vs Cosmopolitan Justice
6: Rawls on Ideal and Nonideal Theory -- 1. Introduction -- 2. What Is Ideal Theory? -- 3. What Is Ideal Theory Good For? -- 4. Should Ideal Theory Set the Target? Should It Set Priorities? -- 5. Is Ideal Theory Too Utopian? -- 6. Is Ideal Theory Too Concessive to Human Nature? -- 7. Ideal Theory, Nonideal Theory and Action Guidance -- 7: The Choice from the Original Position -- Part III: A Theory of Justice -- 8: The Priority of Liberty -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Three Arguments for the Priority of Liberty in Theory -- 2.1 The Self-Respect Argument -- 2.2 The Equal Liberty of Conscience Argument -- 2.3 The Hierarchy Argument -- 3. A Kantian Reconstruction of the Hierarchy Argument -- 3.1 Rationality as a Form of Autonomy -- 3.2 Basic Liberties as Indispensable Supports for Rationality -- 3.3 An Interpretation of the Threshold Condition for Applying the Priority of Liberty -- 4. The Special Status of the Political Liberties -- 5. Conclusion: Implications for the American Practice of Civil Libertarianism -- 9: Applying Justice as Fairness to Institutions -- Introduction -- Institutional Design, the Four-Stage Sequence and Pluralism -- The Basic Liberties and Democratic Institutions -- Fair Equality of Opportunity: Education, Health and Employment -- Health Care -- Employment -- The Family -- The Economy and the Difference Principle -- Conclusion -- Works by Rawls, with Abbreviations -- 10: Democratic Equality as a Work-in-Progress -- Introduction -- 1. What Is Democratic Equality? -- 2. Why Democratic Equality? -- 3. Productive Reciprocity -- 4. Disability and Mutual Care -- 5. Conclusion -- 11: Stability, a Sense of Justice, and Self-Respect -- 1. Stability, Its Role, and Rawls's Two Lines of Argument: A Brief Summary -- 2. Moral Psychology and a Sense of Justice -- 3. Self-Respect and the Kantian Interpretation
Rawls's Conception of Self-Respect and Its Social Bases -- The Significance of Self-Respect for Rawls's Theory -- Kantian Conceptions of Self-Respect: A Troublesome Contrast? -- A Possible Rawlsian Response -- 4. Values Not Lost in the Move to Political Liberalism -- 12: Political Authority, Civil Disobedience, Revolution -- 1. Political Authority and the Duty to Support Just Institutions -- 1.1 Duty and Obligation -- 1.2 The Duty to Obey Unjust Law -- 2. A Just Constitutional Regime -- 3. Justifiable Noncompliance: Civil Disobedience and Conscientious Refusal -- 3.1 Civil Disobedience -- 3.2 Conscientious Refusal -- 4. Revolution -- 5. Conclusion -- Part IV: A Political Conception -- 13: The Turn to a Political Liberalism -- 1. The Original Position and Stability in Theory: The Argumentative Structure -- 1.1 The First Two-Stage Argument: The Justificatory Role of Stability -- 1.2 The Second Two-Staged Argument: The Two Elements of Stability -- 2. Stability in Theory: The Substantive Appeal to the Thin Theory -- 2.1 The Thin and Full Theories Related to the Question of Stability -- 2.2 The Elements of the Thin Theory of the Good -- 2.3 The Thin Theory and the Development of Our Sense of Justice -- 2.4 The Congruence of the Good with Justice -- 3. "The Fact of Reasonable Pluralism" -- 4. Shallow Political Liberalism: Reasonable Pluralism of the Good -- 4.1 Overlapping Consensus and Stability I: Continuity with Theory -- 4.2 The Two Sets Model -- 4.3 The Political Set as Freestanding -- 4.4 Migrations to the Political and Decreasing the Supporting Role of the Good -- 4.5 Overlapping Consensus and Stability II: The Individualized Version -- 5. Deep Political Liberalism: Reasonable Pluralism of the Right -- 5.1 The Double Role of Reasonable Pluralism -- 5.2 The Principle of Liberal Legitimacy and Public Reason
5.3 Overlapping Consensus and Stability III: Individualized Justification of Liberal Legitimacy -- 6. Conclusion -- 14: Political Constructivism -- Practices and Publicity -- Conceptions of Practical Reason -- Constructive Interpretation -- Modeling Convergence -- Justification Rather Than Determination -- Rawls's Kantian Phase -- 15: On the Idea of Public Reason -- 1. The Practice of Public Reason -- 1.1 Subject -- 1.2 Content and Structure -- 1.3 Constituency, Site, and Civility -- 2. The Basis of Public Reason -- 2.1 Autonomy -- 2.2 Coercion and Respect -- 2.3 Justice -- 3. Religion and Public Reason -- 16: Overlapping Consensus -- 1. Introduction: Overlapping Consensus -- 2. Constitutional Consensus -- 2.1 Main Themes of Constitutional Consensus -- 2.2 Temporal Development and Orderly Contestation -- 3. Overlapping Consensus: Stability or Public Political Justification -- 4. Utilitarianism and Overlapping Consensus -- 5. Concluding Thoughts -- 17: Citizenship as Fairness -- John Rawls's Conception of Civic Virtue -- Rawls and Republicanism -- Rawlsian Civic Virtue -- Political Society -- Citizen -- The Reasonable, the Rational, and the Citizen -- Public Reason -- The Duty of (Public) Civility -- Virtue, Friendship, and Social Concord -- Assessing Rawlsian Civic Virtue -- 18: Inequality, Difference, and Prospects for Democracy -- Part V: Extending Political Liberalism: International Relations -- 19: The Law of Peoples -- A Very Brief Intellectual History -- The Law of Peoples in the Greater Scheme of Rawls's Work -- LP and World Politics -- LP and IR -- Conclusion -- 20: Human Rights -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Rawls's Law of Peoples: Some Essential Orienting Background -- 3. Rawls on Human Rights: Some Exposition and Discussion of Key Passages
4. Some Critical Responses to Rawls's Conception of Human Rights and Notable Defenses: A General Overview -- 5. The Functions of Human Rights and the "List Question": A Deeper Analysis -- 6. Some Areas for Further Reflection -- 21: Global Poverty and Global Inequality -- A Global Political Conception -- Rawls's Grounds for Nonextrapolation -- The Cosmopolitanism of Equality and the Original Position -- Goals and Burdens of Assistance -- What Is It about Government? -- Beyond the Standard Case -- 22: Just War -- 1. The Just War Tradition -- 2. A Theory of Justice -- 2.1 Jus ad Bellum -- 2.2 Jus in Bello -- 2.3 Contingent Pacifism -- 3. The Law of Peoples -- 3.1 The Law of Peoples -- 3.2 Jus ad Bellum -- 3.3 Jus in Bello -- 3.4 Supreme Emergency -- 3.5 The Democratic Peace -- Part VI: Conversations with Other Perspectives -- 23: Rawls, Mill, and Utilitarianism -- 1. Rawls and Utilitarianism -- 2. Mill's Utilitarianism: Rawls's Interpretation -- 2.1 Higher Pleasures -- 2.2 Dignity and Happiness -- 2.3 Happiness and Equal Justice -- 2.4 The Liberty Principle -- 2.5 Congruence Arguments -- 2.6 Utility in the Largest Sense -- 2.7 Not Perfectionism -- 3. Against Rawls's Interpretation -- 3.1 Dignity and Individuality -- 3.2 Perfectionism -- 24: Perfectionist Justice and Rawlsian Legitimacy -- 1. Justice and Legitimacy -- 2. The Diversity of Perfectionist Justice -- 3. The Principle of Liberal Legitimacy -- 4. A Brief Note on the Burdens of Judgment -- 5. Rawlsian Perfectionism -- 5.1 Sidgwick and Beyond -- 5.2 The Aristotelian Principle -- 5.3 Self-Respect -- 5.4 State Promotion -- 5.5 The Discrimination Objection -- 5.6 The Political Liberal Turn -- 6. Conclusion -- 25: The Unwritten Theory of Justice -- Rawlsian Liberalism versus Libertarianism -- 1. Constructing the Choice Position -- 2. The Content of Liberty -- The Meaning of Liberty
What Are the Basic Liberties?
Wide ranging and up to date, this is the single most comprehensive treatment of the most influential political philosopher of the 20th century, John Rawls.  An unprecedented survey that reflects the surge of Rawls scholarship since his death, and the lively debates that have emerged from his work Features an outstanding list of contributors, including senior as well as “next generation” Rawls scholars Provides careful, textually informed exegesis and well-developed critical commentary across all areas of his work, including  non-Rawlsian perspectives Includes discussion of new material, covering Rawls’s work from the newly published undergraduate thesis to the final writings on public reason and the law of peoples Covers Rawls’s moral and political philosophy, his distinctive methodological commitments, and his relationships to the history of moral and political philosophy and to jurisprudence and the social sciences Includes discussion of his monumental 1971 book, A Theory of Justice, which is often credited as having revitalized political philosophy
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries
鏈接 Print version: Mandle, Jon Companion to Rawls Oxford : Wiley,c2013 9781444337105
主題 Rawls, John, -- 1921-2002
Electronic books
Alt Author Reidy, David A
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