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作者 Sugita, Mamori
書名 Japanese -te iru and -te aru: The aspectual implications of the stage-level and individual-level distinction
國際標準書號 9781109462470
book jacket
說明 303 p
附註 Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 70-11, Section: A, page: 4267
Adviser: William McClure
Thesis (Ph.D.)--City University of New York, 2009
This dissertation investigates semantic and syntactic properties of the forms --te iru and --te aru in Japanese, as well as pragmatic effects of statements with these forms
With an activity verb in the --te iru form, progressive, experiential, and habitual readings are available. With an achievement verb in the --te iru form, perfective, experiential, and habitual readings are available. I address specifically the difference between perfective and experiential readings. After reviewing the literature, where it seems that the distinction is not clear, I give a series of empirical tests and argue that experiential sentences exhibit properties of individual-level predicates, while perfective (as well as progressive) sentences exhibit properties of stage-level predicates
There are two types of --te aru sentences, intransitivizing and non-intransitivizing --te aru, both of which have been claimed to yield perfective readings. However, I argue that all -- te aru sentences are experiential and exhibit properties that parallel individual-level predicates
This dissertation investigates semantic and syntactic properties of the forms --te iru and --te aru in Japanese, as well as pragmatic effects of statements with these forms. With an activity verb in the --te iru form, progressive, experiential, and habitual readings are available. With an achievement verb in the --te iru form, perfective, experiential, and habitual readings are available. I address specifically the difference between perfective and experiential readings. After reviewing the literature, where it seems that the distinction is not clear, I give a series of empirical tests and argue that experiential sentences exhibit properties of individual-level predicates, while perfective (as well as progressive) sentences exhibit properties of stage-level predicates
There are two types of --te aru sentences, intransitivizing and non-intransitivizing --te aru, both of which have been claimed to yield perfective readings. However, I argue that all -- te aru sentences are experiential and exhibit properties that parallel individual-level predicates
School code: 0046
Host Item Dissertation Abstracts International 70-11A
主題 Language, Linguistics
0290
Alt Author City University of New York. Linguistics
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