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作者 Tuck, Jess Everet
書名 Students' preference for online versus face-to-face academic advising based on individual learning styles
國際標準書號 9781109301199
book jacket
說明 89 p
附註 Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 70-08, Section: A, page: 2895
Adviser: Deborah L. Floyd
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Florida Atlantic University, 2009
The purpose of this study was to examine students' preferred methods of academic advising services and whether they related to their individual learning styles. The first objective of the study was to determine each participant's learning style. The second objective of the study was to determine which method of academic advising each participant preferred. The third objective of the study was to determine whether a relationship existed between the participants' learning styles and preferred methods of academic advising. Additionally, the moderating effect of gender, ethnicity, college major, high school grade point average (GPA), location, and employment on the relationship was considered. Students' learning styles were measured by the Barsch Learning Style Inventory (BLSI). Academic advising preference and demographic information were gathered through a researcher-designed questionnaire. All students (N=1,184) who completed the Online Advising & Registration System (OARS) were contacted via e-mail and received a web link to the BLSI and student questionnaire. Data from the students (n=172) who completed the BLSI and student questionnaire were analyzed. Correlation and multiple regression analysis were used to analyze the quantitative data. A qualitative analysis of four open-ended survey questions was completed. The results found no relationship between participants' learning styles and their preferred methods of academic advising services. Additionally, gender, ethnicity, college major, high school GPA, location, and employment did not moderate the relationship between participants' learning styles and their preferred methods of academic advising services. The findings suggest that a student's learning style is not associated with his or her preference for type of advising. Furthermore, this lack of relationship did not change as a function of gender, ethnicity, college major, high school GPA, location, and employment. Recommendations are provided for researchers and practitioners to further contribute to the literature and practice concerning academic advising preference and learning style
School code: 0119
Host Item Dissertation Abstracts International 70-08A
主題 Education, Guidance and Counseling
Education, Educational Psychology
Education, Technology of
0519
0525
0710
Alt Author Florida Atlantic University
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