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050  4 JK1161.W39 2006eb 
082 0  328.73 
100 1  Wawro, Gregory J 
245 10 Filibuster :|bObstruction and Lawmaking in the U. S. 
       Senate 
264  1 Princeton :|bPrinceton University Press,|c2007 
264  4 |c©2006 
300    1 online resource (326 pages) 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    computer|bc|2rdamedia 
338    online resource|bcr|2rdacarrier 
490 1  Princeton Studies in American Politics: Historical, 
       International, and Comparative Perspectives Ser. ;|vv.134 
505 0  Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- List of Tables 
       -- List of Figures -- Preface -- Chapter 1. Introduction -
       - 1.1 The Centrality of Obstruction to Senate Lawmaking --
       1.2 Obstruction Fundamentals -- 1.3 Layout of the Book -- 
       Chapter 2. Obstruction in Theoretical Context -- 2.1 
       Introduction -- 2.2 Costs and Obstruction -- 2.3 
       Endogenous Rules -- 2.4 Filibusters as Wars of Attrition -
       - 2.5 Relational Legislating and Senate Obstruction -- 2.6
       Predictions about Lawmaking -- 2.7 Discussion -- Chapter 
       3. The Mutability of Senate Rules -- 3.1 Rulings from the 
       Chair and Procedural Innovation in the House -- 3.2 
       Rulings from the Chair and Procedural Innovation in the 
       Senate -- 3.3 The Bank Bill of 1841 -- 3.4 The Federal 
       Elections Bill of 1891 Revisited -- 3.5 Discussion -- 
       Chapter 4. Where's the Pivot? -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 
       Competing Theories about Coalition Sizes -- 4.3 Coalition 
       Sizes on the Passage of Significant Legislation -- 4.4 
       Coalition Sizes and Presidential Regime Shifts -- 4.5 
       Coalition Sizes on Appropriations Bills -- 4.6 Coalition 
       Sizes and Silent Majorities -- 4.7 Conclusion -- Chapter 
       5. Dilatory Motions and the Success of Obstruction -- 5.1 
       Introduction -- 5.2 Uncovering Obstruction -- 5.3 Modeling
       the Success or Failure of Obstruction -- 5.4 Discussion --
       Chapter 6. Obstruction and the Tariff -- 6.1 Introduction 
       -- 6.2 Antebellum Tariff Making -- 6.3 The Tariff from 
       1865 to 1889 -- 6.4 The Tariff from 1890 to 1930 -- 6.5 
       Conclusion -- Chapter 7. Slavery and Obstruction in the 
       Antebellum Senate -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Predictions 
       for Empirical Testing -- 7.3 Empirical Analysis of the Use
       of Dilatory Tactics -- 7.4 Support for Obstructive Efforts
       -- 7.5 Conclusion -- Chapter 8. Obstruction and 
       Institutional Change -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Changes in
       the Political and Institutional Environment -- 8.3 Direct 
       Election 
505 8  8.4 Conclusion -- Chapter 9. Cloture Reform Reconsidered -
       - 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 A Simple Model of Cloture -- 9.3
       Alternative Explanations for Increases in Coalition Sizes 
       -- 9.4 Conclusion -- Chapter 10. The Impact of Cloture on 
       the Appropriations Process -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 
       Institutional Change Relevant to the Appropriations 
       Process -- 10.3 Cloture and Appropriations Deadlines -- 
       10.4 Conclusion -- Chapter 11. Conclusion -- 11.1 The 
       Battle for Majority Cloture in Today's Senate -- 11.2 
       Confrontation, Compromise, and the Gang of Fourteen -- 
       11.3 Desirability of Reform -- 11.4 Prospects for Change -
       - Bibliography -- Index 
520    Parliamentary obstruction, popularly known as the 
       "filibuster," has been a defining feature of the U.S. 
       Senate throughout its history. In this book, Gregory J. 
       Wawro and Eric Schickler explain how the Senate managed to
       satisfy its lawmaking role during the nineteenth and early
       twentieth century, when it lacked seemingly essential 
       formal rules for governing debate. What prevented the 
       Senate from self-destructing during this time? The authors
       argue that in a system where filibusters played out as 
       wars of attrition, the threat of rule changes prevented 
       the institution from devolving into parliamentary chaos. 
       They show that institutional patterns of behavior induced 
       by inherited rules did not render Senate rules immune from
       fundamental changes. The authors' theoretical arguments 
       are supported through a combination of extensive 
       quantitative and case-study analysis, which spans a broad 
       swath of history. They consider how changes in the larger 
       institutional and political context--such as the expansion
       of the country and the move to direct election of senators
       --led to changes in the Senate regarding debate rules. 
       They further investigate the impact these changes had on 
       the functioning of the Senate. The book concludes with a 
       discussion relating battles over obstruction in the 
       Senate's past to recent conflicts over judicial 
       nominations 
588    Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other
       sources 
590    Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest 
       Ebook Central, 2020. Available via World Wide Web. Access 
       may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated 
       libraries 
650  0 United States. -- Congress. -- Senate -- Freedom of 
       debate.;United States. -- Congress. -- Senate -- 
       Cloture.;Filibusters (Political science) -- United States 
655  4 Electronic books 
700 1  Schickler, Eric 
776 08 |iPrint version:|aWawro, Gregory J.|tFilibuster : 
       Obstruction and Lawmaking in the U. S. Senate|dPrinceton :
       Princeton University Press,c2007|z9780691134062 
830  0 Princeton Studies in American Politics: Historical, 
       International, and Comparative Perspectives Ser 
856 40 |uhttps://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/sinciatw/
       detail.action?docID=1422533|zClick to View